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California State Library 



CHiH 1 ^ARY, 



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2 



THE B REEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



L Saturday, January 5, 1907 



THE AMERICAN SPORTSMAN'S FAVORITE 



...THE NEW... 



C& DU PONT SMOKELESS 



Its Regularity Has Won the Confidence of Sportsmen 



I \ 

Uniformity, high velocity, close pattern, quick ignition, perfect combustion, excellent keeping 
qualities, great penetration with minimum pressure and recoil, are some of its special 
features which makes it the preference of MEN WHO KNOW. 

THEY SPECIFY IT IN ALL THEIR SHELLS 



E. I. Du Pont de Nemours Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 



BIG AUCTION 

Beginning at 9 o'clock A. M. on the 

Fair Ranch, Knight's Landing, Cal. 

—ON— 

Thursday, January 10th, 1907 

Horses, Mules and Red Durham Cattle. 

91 Horses i ncluding 63 Draught Horses, 12 

Colts by Yo El Rey, 1 Belgian Stallion, Saddle 
and Buggy Horses, Brood Mares, Etc. 

480 Head Red Durham Cattle 
12 Registered and Graded Bulls 
10 Work Mules 

I Best Steam Harvester with complete 

outfit. Wagons, Plows, Harrows and a large 
assortment of farming implements. 

PLENTY OF GOOD LUNCH. 

Mrs.W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., Proprietress 
J. D. & R. Q. LAWSON, AUCTIONEERS 

WOODLAND, CAL. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



The American 
Thoroughbred 

The Result of 50 Years of Close Study 



No Breeder Can Afford 
To be Without It 

— Price Reduced— 

$4 in Cloth $5 in Leather 

To Be Purchased From 
Foster AO'Rear, Ferry Bide.. San Francisco 
From The Author, Capt. T. B. Merry 
549 Grand Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 



A Futurity Sire 

Futurity trainers and all who train colts should study 
"AXWORTHY" 3) 2:15 

A sire of colt trotters — himself a colt trotter — by a colt trotter — 
from a dam .of colt trotters. 
Let us send you his list. 

Sonu^ojr'na? The Umpire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



Do You Breed for Speed? 

Every breeder of Race Horses, with speed the prime 
consideration, should study the record of 

"McKIINNEY" 2AVA 

the sire who transmits qualities that have won for him a world- 
wide fame. Shall we send you some positively astounding par- 
ticulars? 

The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



W h t* p writ! k i mlly 
mention ti"* journal. 



Wanted- 



AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS WANTED IN 
EVERY TOWN ON THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE 
"BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN" 



141'JO/ 



Saturday, January 5, 1907] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE WEEKLY 

Breeder and Sportsman 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLEY. Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Facific Coast 
OFFICE: 616 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, 
SAN FRANCISCO 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms— One Year $3: Six Months $1.75; Three Months Jl 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 417. San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must bo accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE SIRE OF VENUS, dam of Sidney Dillon. 
Cupid 2:18, Adonis 2:11% and Lea 2:1S%, has been 
a subject of controversy among breeders for many 
years past. When Adonis was one of the stars of the 
racing circuit, sixteen years ago, Wallace's Year 
Book gave Captain Webster as the sire of his dam, 
investigations made at that time by the late Judge 
W. E. Greene of Alameda county furnishing sufficient 
evidence to convince those in authority at the Year 
Book office that this son of Williamson's Belmont 
sired Venus. Afterwards several persons claimed 
that Venture, another son of Belmont, sired the 
mare, and a newspaper controversy arose, which, how- 
ever, amounted to nothing except to befuddle the 
readers thereof and cause the Year Book to give 
Venus' breeding as tmtraced. Some three or four 
years ago Judge Greene, then and to the time of his 
death last year, an honored Judge of the Superior 
Court of Alameda county, decided to put together the 
papers containing the testimony he had gathered in 
the case and informed the editor of this journal that 
when he had them complete he would permit us to 
print them for the benefit of our readers and all 
others interested in getting the facts about this mat- 
ter. Judge Greene was in very poor health at the 
time, and the matter was delayed from month to 
month, trip Judge desiring to make the case com- 
plete before submitting any of it for publication. The 
writer of these lines accompanied Judge Greene when 
one of the principal statements was secured, and 
afterwards when the dam of Venus had been traced 
to the ownership of a man named Nason of Petaluma, 
who had been dead for twenty years, the Judge 
thought perhaps some relative of Nason might still 
be living who could furnish some facts in regard to 
the breeding of the dam of Venus. Judge Greene 
then asked the writer to accompany him to Petaluma 
"some Saturday" on a quest for some one who might 
know the facts about the sale of the Nason mare. 
Rapidly failing health, however, prevented the 
Judge from setting a day when he could make the 
trip, and it was never made. After the death of 
Judge Greene the writer appealed to his son, Mr. 
Carlton W. Greene, of the law firm of Greene & 
Hicken of this city, to know if the papers in this 
case of Venus had been saved from the fire of last 
April, and was very pleased to learn that they were 
all preserved and copies of them would be gladly 
furnished for publication. They are printed in ex- 
tenso on pages four and five of this issue. The collec- ' 
tion of this evidence was a labor that Judge Greene J 
took up solely that the truth might be known. He 



their breeder, Carrison, owned them, and that he 
was told they were by Capt. Webster. The docu- 
ments in the case are printed just as they were fur- 
nished us last week by Mr. Carlton W. Greene, and 
collected by his honored father. To us the evidence 
is conclusive, and we believe the trotting horse 
breeders of America will, after reading it, consider 
that the breeding of Venus is just as is given in 
these statements, which, but for the interest taken 
by Judge Greene in getting at the facts would have 
been lost to the world. 



JAMES COFFIN IS DEAD. After a brief illness 
he passed away at his home in Ross, Marin county, 
on Christmas day, pneumonia being the cause of his 
death. The trotting horse breeding industry and the 
entire community as well, have suffered a great loss. 
Mr. Coffin was a citizen and business man who stood 
in the very front rank and commanded the respect 
of everyone. He was largely interested in sugar 
making and the production of sugar-beets, and being 
a great lover of the American trotting horse, was 
getting together a small but select stud, and had 
just purchased a beautiful piece of land near Pleas- 
anton, where he intended establishing a stock farm. 
He owned a Palo Alto bred young stallion by Mendo- 
cino, and several grandly bred colts, fillies and mares. 
Among the mares he had purchased was Grace Kai- 
ser, the famous dam of Coney 2:20, etc. A two-year- 
old by Zolock 2: 05%, out of Grace Kaiser, was also 
on his farm. Mr. Coffin cared little for racing, but 
loved to drive on the road, and had an ambition to 
own and drive horses of his own breeding that would 
be second to none. He read all the leading writers 
on horse breeding and had a wonderful grasp of all 
the different theories advanced by these writers. The 
stock farm he recently purchased had been placed 
in charge of Joseph Cuicello, the well known trainer, 
who has been in charge of Mr. Coffin's horses for 
years, and enjoyed his fullest confidence. Every 
horse owner and breeder and every other person 
who enjoyed the acquaintance of Mr. Coffin will sin- 
cerely regret his untimely death. He was but 59 
years of age, a man of fine physique and most ex- 
emplary habits, and was truly one of Nature's Noble- 
men. 



A CONVENTION of track managers, harness horse 
owners and others interested in the early formation 
of the California Circuit has been called to meet 
at Pleasanton on Saturday, January 19, 1907. It is 
hoped that representatives from all the principal 
towns on the Cost, where tracks suitable for holding 
meetings are situated, will be present on this occa- 
sion and that they will come prepared to say whether 
their town will give a race meeting during the year 
or not. If a circuit can be arranged and dates agreed 
upon at this convention, programs can be announced 
by the middle of February, or the 1st of March at the 
latest. A good circuit will add to the value of every 
trotting and pacing horse -owned in California. 



had none of the descendants of Captain Webster, but,jn 
on the other hand, had used the blood of Venture in' ' 
his efforts to breed fine horses, and met with sue- 15! 
cess on those lines. He told the writer many times 
that he placed not one particle of weight in the 
stories that were floated about that the dam of 
Venus was by Skenandoah or Algerine, as was given 
by different parties. Judge Greene traced Venus to^ 
her breeder and then found the man (Ellis Holmes) ■ 
who had owned Katie, her dam. Mr. Holmes did notVrtl 
know how Katie was bred, and so stated, and then 
Judge Green found Mr. J. B. Dorr, who owned the 
Bush-street Stables In this city, where Holmes pur- 
chased Katie from Mr. Nason. Mr. Dorr knew noth- 
ing of Katie's breeding, so there the search ended. 
The stories giving the breeding of Venus as by Ven-'^ 
ture out of a mare by Skenandoah or Algerine were«£ 
all told by persons who knew nothing of Venus untily 
after she had been sold by Mr. Parsons to Mr. Lyle. 
Another bit of evidence' in this matter, which the" 
writer had in his possession (and was keeping to J 
publish with this evidence collected by Judge' 
Greene), but which was unfortunately destroyed intj 
the fire, which followed the earthquake of April 18th, u 
was a letter from the A. C. Dietz of Santa Paula, j^j 
who stated that he saw Venus and her sister wheni 



j AN AUCTION SALE of all the live stock on the 
famous Fair ranch at Knight's Landing, Yolo county, 
will be held January 10th. Among the animals to 
be sold are ninety-one horses, of which sixty-three 
are of draft breeds, a Belgian stallion and twelve colts 
iby the thoroughbred horse El Rio Rey. Then there 
fare 480 Red Durham cattle, twelve registered and 
grade bulls, ten work mules, a steam harvester and 
all sorts of wagons, plows, harrows, etc. Everything 
wjll be sold without reserve. J. D. and R. G. Lawson 
of Woodland are the auctioneers. See the advertise- 
ment in this issue. Sale takes place January 10th, 
next Thursday. 



THE BEGINNING OF A NEW YEAR is the time, 
according to almost universal custom in this country, 
for turning over new leaves and making good reso- 
lutions. We can think of no more appropriate thing 
for the harness horsemen of California, the man- 
agers of tracks within the State and the directors of 
driving clubs and trotting associations to do than to 
unite in a firm resolve to organize a California Cir- 
cuit for 1907. We have the horses, the climate and 
the tracks to hold racing second to none, and all wc 
lack is a little energy and enterprise. Let every 
person interested make a firm resolve on New Year's 
day to do what he can to assist in the organization 
of a trotting and pacing circuit for 1907. 



come off on the 12th inst., at Fred H. Chase's sales- 
yard. 478 Valencia street. These horses are of good 
size, some fine single steppers being among them 
as well as several pairs. The majority were sired 
by Mr. Parrott's imported German Coach stallion. 



A mare whose breeding will appeal to every stu- 
dent of trotting horse pedigrees is Alix B. 2:24%, ad- 
vertised for sale in this issue by Mr. Carlton W. 
Greene of 873 Eddy street, this city. She is by 
the great sire of early and extreme speed, Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16%, sire of John A. McKerron 2:04% and 
the dams of Miss Georgie 2:08% and Lady 
Mowry 2:09%, besides a very long list of stand- 
ard performers of note. The dam of Alix B. is Al- 
berta, an own sister to that wonderful trotter Little 
Albert 2:10, whose campaign on the Grand Circuit 
fourteen or fifteen years ago was a sensation. Al- 
berta was by the Electioneer stallion Albert W., out 
of Old Star by Roach's American Star, and the 
next dam was by Black Hawk 767. The combination 
of producing blood lines in this mare is near per- 
fection. Wilkes, Electioneer, American Star and 
Black Hawk — four wonderful producing lines. Alix 
B. was faster than her record by long odds, and as 
a broodmare should make a name for herself. She 
will be sold at a reasonable price. 



THINKS CALIFORNIA SHOULD BE REPRE- 
SENTED. 

To the Editor, Breeder and Sportsman— Dear Sir: 
In your issue of December 8th you publish the re- 
port of the second meeting of the newly organized 
American Trotting Horse Breeders' Association, held 
at the Murray Hill Hotel, in New York. As I read 
of the officers elected, executive committee appointed 
and the board of directors chosen I saw, with regret, 
there was not a representative from this grand 
State, which has produced in years gone by and is 
producing to-day some of the greatest trotters this 
country or any other country has ever seen. When 
it had' its Stanford, Corbitt, Valensin, Rose, Pierce, 
and others too numerous to mention that gathering 
would have been incomplete without its representa- 
tive. Was it from neglect on the part of California, 
or was this State overlooked? If the former, she 
ought to be ashamed, and if the latter, it was very 
poor taste on the part of the Easterners, as no one 
can place her in the rear to-day or yesterday. 

What has she sent across the mountains the past 
year bred, raised and owned here on the golden 
slope? Sweet Marie, Brilliant Girl, Lady Mowry, 
Tuna, John Caldwell, Thomas M., Lucretia and last 
but by no means the least, that great and consistent 
trotter and leading money winner, Charley Belden, 
that raced from early summer to the latter part of 
November and then did what no other horse from 
any other State has ever done— worked a mile better 
than 2:07. And this is to-day's record for California. 
I defy any State in the Union, barring none, to pro- 
duce a record to equal it, and I think she has the 
greatest two-year-old pacer in this whole grand 
United States — I mean the handsome young colt Aero- 
lite 2:15%. And still California is neglected, but 
not always to be, I trust. 

Being a very recently adopted son of California, I 
feel as though an injustice has been done her. and 
coming from a State (Massachusetts) where, if they 
don't get their rights they light for them, that spirit 
in me still lives. 

Trusting you will publish this, if only to make 
the breeders of California wake up, I am yours in 
justice, 

BEX.I. M. CRAM. 
San Francisco, December 31, 1906. 



The statistician of the American Horse Breeder 
states that Ed. Geers leads all drivers in point of 
having marked the largest number of trotters in 2:10 
or better. He credits him with twenty-one, including 
The Abbot, George G., Onward Silver. Dr. Strong. 
The Monk. Fantasy. Lady Gail Hamilton, Prince of 
Orange. Billy Buch, Dan T., Golddust Maid, Zephyr. 
Stanley Dillon. Turley, Nnightingale. Dare Devil. Alex- 
ander, Battleton, Clarita W.. John Mac and Athanio. 
John Dickerson and Scott Hudson are second on the 
list with ten each, while Alta McDonald is next with 
eight, M. E. McHenry and Henry Titer being tied 
with six. Charley De Ryder has put five in this 
exclusive list. Andy McDonald five. Budd Doble four. 
Millard Sanders four. Jack Curry three, ('has. Marvin 
three and J. O. Gerrity, Henry llelman, Chas. Jeffries, 
W. G. Durfee two each. 



The fast pacing mare Flora G., formerly owned 
by M. M. Donnelly, the well known Grove street 
horseshoer, is now the properly of I he old-time 
minstrel, Hilly Arlington, of Los Angeles. 



-o- 



MR. JOHN PARROTT has consigned twenty head 
lof horses to the Combination Sale, advertised to 



A CASE Or CAPPED HOCK. 

Mr. G. E. King of Wlngham. Ont.. writes as fol- 
lows: "I had a valuable marc badly capped on both 
hocks. A bottle of QIINN'S OINTMKNT made her as 
clean as any horse. It does Its work painlessly and I 
have every reason to believe It will do In any ease 
all that Is claimed for It." This Is the general verdict 
of horsemen all over the country. For curbs, splints, 
spavins, wlndpnffs and all bunches there is nothing' 
better. Price, one dollar per bottle, delivered. Address 
\V. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y., If you cannot ob- 
tain from druggist. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 5, 1907 



THE BREEDING OF VENUS 



Documentary Evidence Which Shows That the Dam of Sidney Dillon, 
Cupid 2:18, Adonis 2:11^ and Lea 2:18}, Was Sired 
by Capt. Webster. 



San Francisco, December 26th, 190G. 
Breeder and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal. 

Dear Sirs — Pursuant to the request of your Mr. 
Hackett for data, which my father, the late Judge 
Greene, gathered concerning the breeding of the 
mare Venns (dam of Sidney Dillon), 1 may say that 
as early as 1890, at the request of Count Valensin, 
the then owner of Venus, my father obtained state- 
ments from Ellis H. Holmes of San Francisco, who 
had owned the dam of Venus and from Sabin Harris, 
who had owned and who gave Venus her name. Both 
are now dead. 

I find among my father's correspondence a letter 
from Count Valensin of date January 6th. 1892, which 
refers to the inquiries made by my father, as fol- 
lows: 

"Hon. W. E. Greene, Oakland, Cal. 

"Dear Judge — I enclose you a blank concerning 
Venus, which please fill according to the information 
you gathered for me, and return here so that 1 may 
put it on my books. * * * 

"Yours truly, 

"G. VALENSIN." 

1 believe from what my father told me that the in- 
formation gathered by him for Count Valensin did 
not go beyond the facts stated in the letters from 
Mr. Holmes and Mr. Harris, the originals of which 
I have found amongst the correspondence of Count 
Valensin. which subsequently came to the possession 
of my father as one of the executors of Valensin's 
estate. 

Years later (in 1903) my father on behalf of Ira 
Pierce (one of the owners of Sidney Dillon) pursued 
the investigation further and obtained a number of 
signed statements confirmatory of those of Holmes 
and Harris; those statements speak for themselves; 
the originals are in my possession and I enclose 
copies herewith. Mr. Phelps made two statements, 
the last supplementary of the first, both of which I 
give. 

From these statements the following facts seem 
certain: 

That the dam of Venus was sold about 1869 from 
the stable of J. A. Dorr on Bush street, near the Cali- 
fornia Theatre, by a Mr. Nason of Petaluma, Cal. 
(now dead), and was bought by Ellis H. Holmes, 
then of San Francisco, and now dead. 

Holmes sold her about 1869 or 1870 to Henry Car- 
rison (who lived on the San Pablo Road, about 3% 
miles from Oakland), and Carrison named the mare 
Katie. 

Carrison bred her to Capt. Webster in the winter 
of 1870-71, and the get was a black filly. 

Carrison then bred her to Capt. Webster again 
in the winter of 1871-72. getting a chestnut filly, 
foaled in the winter of 1S72-73. This was the mare 
Venus. 

That Carrison died in June, 1873, and both fillies 
were sold to Mr. Geo. Parsons, who lived near the 
Carrisons. 

Parsons had both fillies broken to harness by his 
nephew, Brainard, and later gave them to Sabin 
Harris of Oakland to drive for him and shortly sold 
the chestnut filly to Harris, who named her Venus. 
Harris made inquiries as to the breeding of Venus 
on his own account and satisfied himself from the 
service book of Capt. Webster (then in possession 
Of Walt. Smith's widow) that the only mare that 
Carrison owned, which was the Holmes mare Katie, 
was bred to Capt. Webster in the stud season of 
1872; he also found that Venture (who some have 
thought to be the sire of Venus) stood in San Mateo 
in that same season and that it was highly improb- 
able that the mare would have been bred to Ven- 
ture, even without the proof furnished by the Capt. 
Webster stud book. 

The statement of Mr. Brainard is found to be con- 
sistent with this memorandum of the service to Capt. 
Webster if we assume, what appears to be the fact, 
that the mare was bred to Capt. Webster shortly be- 
fore January 1st, 1872; Venus would then have been 
foaled in the winter of 1872-1873 and would have 
been hardly more than two months past three years 
old when Harris bought her in February, 1876. 

Yours truly, 

CARLTON W. GREENE. 



(Copy) 

Oakland, Cal., Sept. 17, 1890. 
G. Valensin, Esq., Pleasanton, Cal. 

Dear Sir — I am informed by Judge W. E. Greene 
of Oakland, Cal., that you are desirous of ascertain- 
ing the breeding of the mare Venus, the mother of 
Adonis, the pacer, and at his request 1 give you the 
facts, as follows: 

Venus was bred by a man by the name of Henry 
Carrison, who then resided on what is known as the 
San Pablo Road, about three miles northerly from 
this city. Mr. Carrison also bred another mare a 
year older, from the dam of Venus. While yet the 
owner of Venus, her sister and their dam, Mr. Carri- 
son died, and thereafter Venus, her sister and their 
dam were sold to George D. Parsons, then living on 
(he above named San Pablo Road, just outside the 
limits of this city. Mr. Parsons remained the owner 
of Venus until about the month of February, A. D. 
1876, when I purchased her of him, giving him 
($250.00) two hundred and fifty dollars for her. This 



mare Venus was three years old when 1 purchased 
her and I gave her the name of Venus. At the time 
I purchased this mare she was three years old and 
only three years old. When I purchased this mare 
of Mr. Parsons I inquired of him in regard to who 
bred her, and where she was bred and what her 
breeding was. and he told me that Henry Carrison 
bred her and that she was then three years old, and 
that Mr. Carrison told him that she was sired by a 
Belmont horse and he was of the impression he told 
him that it was Venture, the son of Belmont. At this 
time (when Mr. Parsons sold Venus to me and told 
me this) Mr. Henry Carrison's wife had also died, 
leaving no children. I then set about it to get what 
evidences I could as to the sire of Venus and 1 found 
that Venture stood for service in the season of 1S72, 
when Venus was sired, at San Mateo in San Mateo 
county, on the other side of the Bay of San Fran- 
cisco, and about thirty miles from where the breeder 
of Venus then lived. It occurred to me possibly Mr. 
Alonzo Schutt, who lived on the place where Venus 
was bred and owned till sold to Parsons, might give 
me some information on the subject, and, meeting 
him on the street one day, I asked him about it, and 
he replied that he knew nothing about it, but that 
there was an advertisement of the stallion Capt. Web- 
ster for the stud season of the year 1872 posted up 
In the stable where he lived and where Venus was 
bred. I went out with him to the stable and found 
the advertisement of Capt. Webster posted up there 
in Mr. Schutt's stable, as he had stated. It was for 
the stud season of 1872, and to my own knowledge 
Capt. Webster stood in this city and its immediate 
outskirts for the season of 1872. Mr. Walt Smith, 
then resident of Oakland, owned Capt. Webster. Mr. 
Smith in 1876. when I was making the investigation, 
was dead. His widow then lived in this city (Oak- 
land), and I called on her, found she had a little 
memorandum book of Capt. Webster's service for 
the year of 1872, and on examination I found a mem- 
orandum statement to the effect that Mr. Henry Car- 
rison had that year bred a mare to Capt. Webster. 
1 then ascertained that the mother of Venus was the 
only mare Mr. Henry Carrison then (1872) owned. 
These are the facts and the whole facts in the mat- 
ter of the breeding of Venus as far as I know. 

Verv respectfully, 

' SABIN HARRIS. 



San Francisco, October 11, 1890. 
W. E. Greene, Esq. 

Dear Sir — In answer to your inquiries regarding 
the dam of Venus 1 will state that in 1869 or 1870, 
1 bought of a man from Petaluma the mare whose 
pedigree you want. I have forgotten the name of 
the man who sold me the mare. I remember that 
she was kept at Dorr's stable on Bush street, near 
the California Theatre. She was a very handsome 
light bay and weighed about 950 pounds. She was 
a good traveler and kind and gentle in disposition. 
She was foundered the first time she was driven after 
I bought her. I sent her to pasture and soon after 
sold her to Henry Carrison, who lived on San Pablo 
avenue, about 3% miles from Oakland, and it was 
on this ranch of about 25 acres that Venus and her 
black sister were born. Mr. Carrison died in June, 
1873, at his home on San Pablo avenue, and his wife 
died about seven months afterwards in San Fran- 
cisco. 

I regret very much that I can give you no more 
definite information regarding the mother of Venus. 
If Mr. Dorr could be found something, perhaps, might 
be learned from him. I think Venus was sired in 
1870 or 1871, and it is quite certain that Mr. Carri- 
son did not go far from his ranch to procure service 
for the mare. 

Verv truly yours, 

ELLIS H. HOLMES. 
P. S. — I will add to what I have written that before 
Mrs. Carrison came to San Francisco to reside, she 
sold the colts to Geo. W. . arsons. E. H. H. 



To Ira Pierce Esq., San Francisco, Cal., and Whom 
It May Concern: 

I, George Henry Phelps, of the City of San Fran- 
cisco, California, hereby certify: 

That I reside at 2964 Twenty-second street in said 
city, and am doing business at my said residence; 

That I am forty-five years of age; that my mother, 
Mrs. Frances R. Phelps, is the daughter of the late 
Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison (now deceased) of Alameda 
county in said State; 

That my grandmother, the said Mrs. Mabel A. Car- 
rison, married the late Henry Carrison (now deceas- 
ed) as her third husband and that. Mr. Henry Carri- 
son resided on a small piece of land on San Pablo 
avenue, about three and one-half miles north of the 
city of Oakland, in said Alameda county, and of 
course my grandmother was with him for quite a 
number of years before and up to his death, which 
occurred on the 4th day of June, 1873; 

That I was residing with my parents in the city 
of Oakland, Cal., at the time of Henry Carrison's 
death and had been for several years and before that 
1 had resided all my life in San Francisco, Cal.; 

That I was in tue habit of visiting my grandmother, 
Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison, at her husband's residence 
on San Pablo avenue aforesaid, very frequently for 



many years before Mr. Carrison's death and at times 
stopping there with my grandmother as long as a 
month at a time; 

That I was well acquainted with Mr. Carrison's 
horse stock at the time of his death, and for many 
years before; 

That I remember well the sale by my Uncle Ellis 
Holmes, then of San Francisco (now deceased) of 
the bay mare spoken of in Mr. Holmes' letter to W. 
E. Greene, and hereto prefixed, and I know that 
from the time of such sale and up to the death of 
Mr. Carrison, Mr. Carrison owned no horses of any 
kind save and except the said Holmes mare, a geld- 
ing which he called Old John, and the two fillies — a 
black and a chestnut, which Mr. Carrison bred from 
this mare of Mr. Holmes; 

That the black filly which he bred from this mare 
was foa ed in eighteen hundred and seventy-one, and 
the chestnut filly was foaled in 1872. and both of 
(hese fillies were to my positive knowledge sired by 
Captain Webster, a stallion then owned in Oakland, 
California; I know this to be the fact, because I was 
residing, or visiting rather, my grandmother at Mr. 
Carrison's when this Holmes mare was bred to Capt. 
Webster in 1870, and again in 1871; 

That I was at Mr. Carrison's when these fillies fol- 
lowed their dam. and knew them well from the time 
they were foaled until they were sold by my grand- 
mother, Mrs. Carrison, to George W. Parsons, who 
resided then near San Pablo avenue, just north of 
the city of Oakland; 

That Mr. Carrison called the Holmes mare Katie. 

GEO. H. PHELPS. 



To Whom It May Concern: 

This is to certify— That I, Mrs. George W. Par- 
sons, the undersigned, am the widow of George W. 
Parsons, deceased, who, for more than twenty-nine 
years prior to his death, which occurred in the year 
of 1882, resided with his family near San Pablo ave- 
nue, and just north of the city of Oakland, in Ala- 
meda county, California, and where I now reside; 

That I was, for many years prior to their deaths, 
we., acquainted with Henry Carrison and his wife, 
Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison. who for many years resided 
on San Pablo avenue, about three and one-half miles 
nortnerly from the city of Oakland; that I was quite 
intimate with Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison, and was with 
her at her house on said avenue at the time of the 
death of her nusband, Henry Carrison; 

That in the fall of 1873, after the death of Mr. 
Henry Carrison, Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison besought 
me to get my husband, George W. Parsons, to buy 
and I did induce my husband to buy and he did buy 
of Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison, a gelding called Old John, 
two fillies (a blp.ck and a chestnut), a buggy, har- 
ness, robe, and some hay, which property Mr. Henry 
Carrison left at his death, as a part of his estate; 

That at the time my husband purchased said prop- 
erty of Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison, Mrs. Carrison in- 
formed my husband that said two fillies were sired 
by the horse Capt. Webster, then owned in the city 
of Oakland, and thereafter my husband and myself 
alyays understood that said fillies were sired by 
('apt. Webster, and nothing was ever said by my 
husband to the contrary during nis lifetime, so far 
as I know; 

That my husband sold the said chestnut filly to 
Mr. Sabin Harris, now deceased, but then of Oak- 
land. California, who was at that time proprietor of 
the Dexter Stables in Oakland, aforesaid; 

That Mr. George W. Brainard, now doing business 
at Golden Gate, was in the employ of my husband 
at the time said fillies were being broken to harness, 
and broke them to harness: that Mr. Brainard was 
a nephew of my husband and while so in the em- 
ploy of my husband, resided with myself and hus- 
band and was a member of our family. 

SUSAN A I'ARSONS. 

MRS. GEORGE W. PARSONS. 

December 3, 1903. 



To Whom It May Concern: 

This is to certify — That I, George W. Brainard, the 
undersigned, now reside, and for twenty-nine years 
have resided, in what is now called Golden Gate, Ala- 
meda county, State of California: that I am engaged 
in the real estate business in Golden Gate, in Ala- 
meda county, in said State, and am fifty-one years of 
age; 

That I am a nephew of the late George W. Par- 
sons, who for some years prior to 1873 and from 
that time on up to his death, resided near San Pablo 
avenue, just north of the city of Oakland, in said 
Alameda county; 

That in the year 1874. I went into the employ of 
my said uncle, George W. Parsons, and while in his 
employ I became a member of his family, residing 
with him: 

i nat while so in the employ of George W. Parsons, 
and in the fall of the year of 1875. I broke to harness 
two fillies (the one a black and the other a chestnut), 
full sisters, which Mr. Parsons had theretofore pur- 
chased of Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison, the widow of Mr. 
Henry Carrison, deceased; 

That in the early part of the year of 1876. Mr. 
George W. Parsons gave the said two fillies to Sabin 
Harris to drive and handle, and shortly thereafter 
Mr. Harris, who was then proprietor of the Dexter 
Stables in Oakland aforesaid, purchased of Mr. Par- 
sons the chestnut filly aforesaid for the sum of two 
hundred and fifty dollars; that in a short time after 
such sale Mr. Parsons took the black filly home and 
I commenced to drive her again; 

That at the time Mr. Harris purchased said chest- 
nut filly, she was four years old and the black filly 
was five years old ; 

That the black filly was considerably larger than 



Saturday, January 5, 1907] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



the chestnut filly and in my judgment was naturally 
a much better individual and much faster mare; 

That the black filly, owing to careless handling, 
after I quit driving her, got foundered, and later 
Mr. Parsons disposed of her, but what thereafter be- 
came of her I do not know; 

That the black filly was quite easy to break and 
was kind, but the chestnut was willful] and hard to 
break and was inclined to kick and run away when 
in harness: 

That while I was in the employ of Mr. George W. 
Parsons aforesaid, I remember very definitely and 
distinctly to have heard him speak of these fillies as 
having been sired by a horse called Capt. Webster. 

GEO. W. BRAIN ARD. 

Golden Gate, Cal., Dec. 3d, 1903. 



Napa, September 23d, 1904. 

W. E. Greene, Esq. 

Dear Sir — Yours of the 22d just received. I can 
give you very little information about the mare you 
speak of. The mare came from a Mr. Nason. who 
lived at that time at or near Petaluma. Mr. Nason 
has been dead for twenty years. That is all I can 
tell you about the mare. 

Yours very truly, 

J. B. DORR. 



Napa, December 28th, 1904. 

W. E. Greene, Esq. 

Dear Sir — I have received both of your letters. All 
the knowledge I have of the mare of which you 
spoke I sold from my stable thirty-six years ago; 
I gave you all the particulars I have of her in my 
last letter. I would gladly answer your questions 
if it was in my power to do so. But I know nothing 
more of her than what I have told you. 

Very truly yours, 

J. B. DORR. 



To Whom It May Concern: 

I, George H. Phelps, the undersigned, do hereby 
certify: That I am forty-five years of age, that I 
was born in the city of San Francisco. State of Cali- 
fornia, and that I do now reside, and have always 
resided, in said city, except for about three years, 
when I resided in the city of Oakland, in said State, 
and for about five years when I resided with Mr. 
and Mrs. Carrison, as hereinbefore stated; that I 
am now and have been for some time, engaged in 
business at number 2964 Twenty-second street, in 
said city of San Francisco; 

That I have read the letter dated "San Francisco, 
Oct. 11, 1890," and statement by Mrs. E. H. Holmes 
un the back theivaf, in possession of and addressed 
to W. E. Greene, and signed by Ellis H. Holmes, 
which is in the following words, to-wit: 

"San Francisco, Oct. 11, 1890. 
"W. E. Greene, Esq.: 

"Dear Sir — In answer to your inquiries regarding 
the dam of Venus I will state that in 1869 or 1870 
I bought of a man from Petaluma the mare whose 
pedigree you want. I have forgotten the name of 
the man who sold me the mare. I remember that 
she was kept at Dorr's stable on Bush street, near 
the California Theatre. She was a very handsome 
li&ui bay and weighed about 950 pounds. She was 
a good traveler and kind and gentle in disposition. 
She w^s foundered the first time she was driven 
after I bought her. I sent her to pasture and soon 
after sold her to Henry Carrison, who lived on San 
Pablo avenue, about 3% miles from Oakland, and 
it was on this ranch of about 25 acres that Venus 
and her black sister were born. Mr. Carrison died 
in June, 1873, at his home on San Pablo avenue and 
his wife died about seven months afterwards in San 
Francisco. 

"I regret very much that I can not give you more 
definite information regarding the mother of Venus. 
If Mr. Dorr could be found something, perhaps, could 
be learned from him. I think Venus was sired in 
1870 or 1871 and it is quite certain that Mr. Carri- 
son did not go far from his ranch to procure service 
for the mare. 

"Very truly yours, 

"ELLIS H. HOLMES." 
"P. S. — I will add to what I have written that be- 
fore Mrs. Carrison came to San Francisco to reside, 
she sold the colts to Geo. W. Parsons. E. H. H." 

On the back of said letter is the following state- 
ment, to-wit: 

"The within letter was entirely written, dated and 
signed by my late husband, Ellis H.- Holmes, now 
deceased. MRS. ELLIS. H. HOLMES. 

"San Francisco, Cal., November, 1903." 

That said letter was entirely written, dated and 
signed by Ellis H. Holmes, now deceased, late of 
San Francisco, California, and the statement on the 
back thereof was written by Mrs. Ellis H. Holmes, 
his widow; 

That Ellis H. Holmes, the writer of said letter, 
was the husband of my mother's youngest sister; 
that he became the principal of the Boys and Girls 
High School in the city of San Francisco at the or- 
ganization of that school and remained the principal 
thereof until it was succeeded by the organization 
of the' Boys High' School and of the Girls High School, 
in San Francisco, and then he became the principal 
of the Girls High School and remained such princi- 
pal for several years thereafter; 

That I recollect well the mare mentioned in said 
letter as having been sold by Ellis H. Holmes to 
Henry Carrison and I remember the fact of such 
sale; 

That I knew Henry Carrison well at the time of, 
and long before, such sale, and thereafter up to the 
time of his death; 

That Mrs. Mabel A. Carrison, his wife, was my 



maternal grandmother, Mr. Carrison being her third 
husband ; 

That my said grandmother did not become the 
mother of any child by Mr. Henry Carrison and that 
Mr. Henry Carrison left no child at his death; 

That Mr. Henry Carrison died at his home on San 
Pablo avenue, about three and one-half miles norther- 
ly from said city of Oakland, on the 4th day of June, 
1873, and his wife, Mabel A. Carrison (having re- 
moved from her home on San Pablo avenue to San 
Francisco. Cal., some months after Mr. Garrison's 
death), died February 25th, 1874, in San Francisco. 
California : 

That at the time Mr. Henry Carrison bought said 
mare of Ellis H. Holmes, I was residing with Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Carrison at their home on San Pablo 
avenue aforesaid, and continued to so reside with 
them until his death, and thereafter with his Wife, 
my grandmother, until she removed, as aforesaid, to 
San Francisco, Cal.; 

That in the early part of the year 1870, Mr. Carri- 
son bred the said Holmes mare to the stallion Cap- 
tain Webster, then owned and kept in the city of 
Oakland, California, and the result of such breeding 
was a black filly, foaled in the early part of 1871; 
that in the early part of the year 1871, Mr. Carrison 
again bred said Holmes mare to the said stallion, 
Captain Webster, and the result of such breeding 
was a chestnut filly, foaled in the early part of the 
year of 1872; 

That the man who had the stallion Captain Web- 
ster in charge the year of 1870 and the man who 
had him in charge in the year of 1871, drove him to 
Mr. Carrison's residence on San Pablo avenue, and 
bred him to the Holmes mare, above referred to, in 
my presence in Mr. Henry Carrison's corral in each 
of said years; 

That at the time Mr. Henry Carrison bought said 
mare of Mr. Holmes, Mr. Carrison owned but one 
horse of any kind and that was a gelding which he 
called Old John, and that from the time of the pur- 
chase of said mare up to the time of Mr. Carrison's 
death, Mr. Carrison neither had nor owned any horse 
stock whatever, except the said Holmes mare, the 
said gelding Old John, and the said two fillies which 
he raised from the Holmes mare; 

That at the time of Mr. Carrison's death the only 
horse stock Mr. Carrison left was the said gelding 
Old John and the said two fillies he raised from the 
Holmes mare; 

That Mr. Henry Carrison left a last will by which 
he gave to his wife all his property save a cane and 
his jewelry, and made his wife executrix of his will; 

That just before she left her home on San Pablo 
avenue in the fall of 1873 and went to San Francisco 
to reside she sold the said gelding Old John and the 
said two fillies to George W. Parsons, who then re- 
sided just north of the city of Oakland, on said San 
Pablo avenue; 

That Mr.. Carrison called this Holmes mare Katy, 
and she was known by that name until he sold her, 
which was some little time before his death; 

That this Holmes mare was a bright bay in color 
and was a very beautiful animal; she was very sensi- 
tive, nervous and high-spiriter, but kind; she was 
finely formed, evenly turned, had a clean neck, a very 
intelligent and beautiful head, and fine sinewy legs 
and a fine coat of hair; 

I used to ride with Mr. Carrison behind her into 
the city of Oakland frequently and we used to pass 
everything on the road, and, from my recollection 
of her speed, I think she could pull a buggy at the 
rate of a mile in two minutes and forty seconds; 

That I took a fancy to the black filly and Mr. 
Carrison said I could have her, but I failed to get 
her; she was kind and gentle, but the chestnut filly 
was a vicious little creature and would kick one 
if she got a chance. 

GEORGE H. PHELPS. 

San Franciseco, November , 1903. 

o 

THE HUMBLE HALS. 



Only a John Trotwood Moore could write the his- 
tory of the famous Hal family and hold the interest 
of the reader through a series of articles continuing 
for more than a year. But the Tennessee editor and 
poet knows how, none better, to weave the threads 
of romance into the fabric of fact, and therein lies 
his magic power with the pen. In the November 
number of Trotwood's Monthly appears an article by 
him about Sweepstakes, the greatest of Tennessee's 
pacing mares, written several years before her 
death, which was the result of old age. Following 
is an interesting excerpt: 

Lazily cropping the blue grass in her owner's pad- 
dock last week was a typical Tennessee pacing mare, 
whose son had made her immortal, and yet, as we 
passed our hand over her graceful neck which, from 
the way it took caressing, showed that its owner 
expected it, we could not help but think that if her 
name had been withheld we might readily have be- 
lieved that she was but one of the hundred other 
pacing matrons we daily see. Before us was a light- 
bay mare, fifteen and a half hands high, with black 
points and one white hind coronet and the faintest 
suspicion of a star in the forehead; a good mane and 
tail, a foretop faring thick and low, a bright, promi- 
nent brown eye, a broad and bony forehead, a long 
neck, held almost straight, with a fall and then a 
rather sudden rise at the withers, so characteristic 
of the best saddlers; deep, sloping shoulders, end- 
ing abruptly in an undulating mass of muscle on 
the forearms, making a striking contrast to the 
clean, hard, flinty bones of the legs beneath, closely 
knitted, yet supple, without puff or splint, and capped 



with a short, well-rounded hoof; medium back, in- 
clined a little to sink — from age, for she is twenty- 
one years old — a deep closely-ribbed chest and 
rounded barrel, broad flanks, with an immense play 
from hip to hock, and then the same muscle and the 
same clean, bard legs behind, finishes the pen picture 
of Sweepstakes, the dam of Hal Pointer, unquestion- 
ably the greatest race horse that has ever appeared 
on American tracks. 

Sweepstakes was born in 1872, the property of 
Armstrong Glenn, who lived in Williamson county, 
Tennessee. Her dam, Kit, by McMeen's Traveler, 
was bred and owned by William Blair, also of Wil- 
liamson county. Her sire was a horse of scarcely 
local reputation, aside from the fact that he was 
one of the many scions of the Kittrell Hal horse — 
the Knight's Snow Heels, by Knight's Tom Hal, by 
Kittrell's Hal. Her dam, Kit, by McMeen's Traveler, 
may be regarded as having greatly the advantage 
of the horse to which she was mated, so far as the 
fame of their two sires went, for of all the horses 
that Tennessee ever produced it is probable that 
none, twenty years ago, enjoyed the celebrity and 
distinction which by consensus of opinion were 
showered on Old Traveler, as he was usually called. 
Since then he has been surpassed in popular favor — 
as what horse would not have been — by Gibson's 
Tom Hal, by far the greatest son of the Kittrell 
horse. But as a sire of dams, in the opinion of many, 
even this great horse does not surpass McMeen's 
Traveler. Uniting as he does both branches of the 
Hal family full of hot blood, on that of the Traveler 
equally as hot-blooded, it is not difficult to see where 
Hal Pointer gets his gameness. 

But continue with his clam; she fell into the hands 
of Colonel Sam Pointer, who long used her as a 
model saddle mare, and in whose possession, if we 
mistake not, she lost one eye on a dark night in a 
fox hunt, from the jagged end of a limb. At his 
death, Captain Henry P. Pointer bought her, and 
she is now owned by his estimable lady, Captain 
Pointer having died last spring. At present a long, 
rangy, quiet, up-headed colt, full of conscious pride 
and barely inquisitive enough to arch up at the sight 
of a stranger to just the pitch of an artist's touch, 
plays by the great matron's side, apparently oblivious 
of the fact that his sire is the greatest sire of pacers, 
and his brother the greatest living pacer in the 
world. 

There are many famous trotting and pacing brood- 
mares, but Sweepstakes, the dam of Hal Pointer 
2:04V£, and Star Pointer 1:59%, surpasses them all 
in the low average of her two famous sons. 

And yet, strange to say, neither this mare nor 
any of her ancestors was bred for speed. Nay, not 
even her world-beating son, Hal Pointer, who did so 
much for pacers and pacing races. If the old owners 
of the old pacers of Tennessee could come from 
their last resting place and be told that their horses 
had made their greatest fame, not as saddlers, but 
as race horses, the old fellows would wonder in 
what manner they raced, for such a thing as har- 
ness races were unheard-of in their day. Sweep- 
stakes was bred as a saddle mare and passed most 
of her life as one. So was her son bred for a saddle 
horse, and used until he was five years old under 
the saddle. Our success or failure in life is often 
an undreamed of result, and I am sometimes half in- 
clined to think that Owen Meredith was right when 
he said: 

"We but catch at the skirt of the thing we would be 
And fall back in the lap of false destiny." 

Ah, well, I will not grumble with Meredith, but. be 
thankful that I fell back in a lap at all — I might have 
hit the ground! 

Still, it is a little amusing that after all the money 
and time spent, and all the hobbies ridden, 
and all the theories advanced, and all the hard work 
by the breeders of the light harness world in the 
last fifty years, that at last the first mare to enjoy 
the distinction of having the two fastest sons in the 
world was not bred for speed at all, and that none 
of her ancestors were bred for speed, or that the 
faintest suspicion of "going fast" ever entered into 
the calculation of their various breeders or owners! 
And yet, it is a fact, Knight's Snow Heels, the sire 
of Sweepstakes, was used only as a saddle horse, 
and his sire, Knight's Tom Hal, stood only for saddle 
purposes, and his sire, Kittrell's Tom Hal, was 
brought from Kentucky for nothing in the world 
but to stand as a saddle horse, without any idea, 
perhaps, on the part of his owner, Major Kittrell, 
that any of his descendants would ever get in be- 
tween a pair of shafts. And Tom Hal, the horse to 
which Sweepstakes was mated to fame, was not 
even supposed to be good enough to sire saddlers, 
so was brought tip to ride and now and then, as I 
am creditably told, to pull a tanbark mill, 'round 
and 'round, all day long, till the endless, ceaseless go- 
ing got into his nature and the deathless qualities 
of the tanbark into his very soul. 

Verily, It taketh the tanbark mill to bring out 
what is in us. 

And the point I wish to make is just this: If these 
horses have given us world-beaters without any 
effort on our part to breed world-beaters, what will 
they not do when the years go by and we begin to 
breed for speed — the best to the best. What a plt.y 
there are not more tanbark mills in trotting sec- 
tions! 

o 

Ned Lindsey, son of the veteran trainer and driver. 
L. B. Lindsey, has accepted a position on C. X. Lai 
rabee's Brook Nook Ranch in Montana. 

o 

Your stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's Napa 
Soda. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 5, 1907 



I NOTES AND NEWS I 

I 

That San Joaquin Valley Circuit is all right. 



And the sooner it announces its purses the better. 

Every horseman should do a little boosting for it 
and make entries in all the classes possible. 



During the past four seasons Sweet Marie 2:02 
has started in thirty-four races, winning twentv-nine 
firsts and two seconds, a most remarkable showing 
and one never equaled by any trotter. 



Concha, the dam of Italia 2: 04%. has been booked 
to Audubon Hoy 1:59%, by her owner, W. C. McCully 
of Hlooniington, Cal. 



Wild Nutling 2:11i4 by Wildnut out of Helena 
2: 1 1 % by Electioneer, is now owned at Santa Maria 
Cal. 



An Arizona horseman edvertises in his county 
paper that his horse Val Krino is "the most thorough- 
bred stallion in the Gila valley." 

That mile of Sonoma Girl's in 2:07 on Christmas 
day at Los Angeles enables quite a bunch of us 
to say: "We told vou so." 



Secretary Redpath of the Los Angeles Driving 
Club has resigned and Mr. A. L. Stewart has been 
chosen in his stead. 



At the track at Fresno every stall is occupied and 
as the course is kept in perfect order, trainers are 
haying great success in developing speed there 
Athasham 2:12 and The Donna 2:09%, two of the 
good winners of 1906, reecived all their earlv work 
there. 



If you want something extra good at prices that 
are within reason make a date with Martin Carter 
proprietor of the Nutwood Stock Farm at Irvington 
and visit, his place, where you will be shown a 
bunch of youngsters that it will be easy to pick a 
good one from, as there are no poor ones among them. 

Louis Hachant of Fresno, owner of Athasham 2 '2 
has a filly at the Fresno track by Athablo out of 
a mare by Hanibletonian Wilkes, second dam bv 
Mambrino Wilkes, that is one of the most promising 
youngsters ever seen on the Fresno track 



When a horse is working hard and highlv fed 
all the week he should have his food reduced on 
Sunday, and one meal should be bran mash If he 
sets his regular amount of food he should have some 
exercise. 



The Christmas edition of the Rural Spirit is one 
of the best of the holiday papers that has reached 
this office. 



Ed \\ right of Hollister will winter his filly, Salva 
by Dictatus .Medium, at home and return" her to 
trainer Chas. Whitehead at Salinas track in the 
spring. This filly is one of the best prospects in 
lamorma. She is a pacer and was one of the four 
starters in the three-year-old pacing division of the 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity, won at Woodland last 
August by that phenomenal filly Magladi, whose 
heats m 2:11%, 2:10% and 2:12% were the talk of 
horsemen all over the Coast. In this race the great 
colt McFadyen was second every heat and Salva 
was third every time, and beat 2:15 every heat. She 

llas flI1< ' 1 1 Sreatly sine Mien and it will take 

sickness or accident to prevent her beating 2- 10- as 
a four-year-old. 



Sweet Mane 2:02 is to be sent for the cups and 
ribbons at the matinees this year, her new owner 
being a member of the New York Driving Club She 
should be able to fill a shelf or two with cups dur- 
ing the season. 



It has been figured out by one of the "statisticians" 
that less than one-half the trotters that started on 
the Grand Circuit during 1906 failed to get records. 

Rey del Diablo won six races during 1906, and was 
then sold for $400 more than he cost the man that 
raced him. 



Oro Drew 2:24% by Oro Wilkes out of Laura 
Drew by Arthurton has been sold to Australian 
parties for a broodmare. She is now nine years 
old and was bred at San Mateo bv the late William 
Corbitt. 

The Los Angeles Driving Club proposes to hold 
matinees every two weeks during the winter and 
spring months. The new secretary, Mr. Stewart, is 
a hustler. 



Dr. J. H. Barr of Marysville recently lost his 
favorite pacing mare, Midget, from blood-poisoning 
resulting from her being snagged while in pasture. 
o 

TO CUBE A COLD IN ONE DAY 

Take LAXATIVE BROMO Quinine Tablets. Drug- 
gists refund rnone.r if it fails to cure. E. W. GROVE'S 
signature is on each box. 25c. 



Ail effort was recently made by the defeated direc- 
torate of the Los Angeles Agricultural Association 
to lease Agricultural Park and race track there to 
a circus management for winter quarters. The horse- 
men and a squad of police successfully prevented the 
circus people from entering the gates, however, and 
the effort was a failure. 



Grass is growing on all the hills and in the valleys 
and the price of hay shold fall below $20 per ton 
with a few weeks. 



Seattle recently held a horse show, and the people 
up there have been arguing even since as to just 
what "appointments" are proper in the various 
classes. 



March 7th. 8th and 9th are the dates set for the 
big Tournament of Roses and Horse Show at Pleas- 
anton this year. The officers and directors of the 
association are as follows: F. E. Wilcox, president; 
E. D. Neff, secretary and treasurer; John Cravens, 
A. K. Macomber, John B. Mills, Thad Lowe and 
Colonel W. J. Hogan. 



Mr. D. D. Christman of Modesto is now engaged 
in the mule business and has some of the finest 
mules in the State. He also deals in draft horses 
and has a few good ones on hand. 



From an article printed in the Christmas Horse Re- 
view, we learn that Charles DeRyder started in nine- 
ty races last year, of which he won 33, was second 
26 times, third 15 times and fourth seven times, being 
unplaced but nine times. His winnings amount to 
$22,280. 



Those yearlings you were talking about last month 
are now two-year-olds. 



"Bar the hopples" is being heard frequently now- 
adays, but when the dates for closing entries to 
purse races come around the Indiana pajamas will 
be considered full-dress for all pacing parties. 



Wild Bell 2:17% by Wildnut is now a member of 
Chas. DeRyder's string at Pleasanton. This horse 
is very fast, and if he gets to trotting steadily will 
lower bis mark materially. 



Dan Misner has sold to Mr. Peach of the Alvarado 
Sugar Company a very promising two-year-old by L. 
W. Russell out of Hazel Mac by Director. 



Lee Wells of Pleasanton is the owner of a young 
Searchlight that he is just breaking, and thinks 
perhaps will be faster than its illustrious dad. 



Ed Parker has reached Pleasanton with eight head 
of Oregon horses that seem to feel right at home in 
the rain. 



A meeting of the stockholders of the Kings County 
Fair Association was held December 19th, at the 
office of the secretary, F. L. Howard, in Hanford. The 
election of a board of directors for the coming year 
resulted as follows: J. W. McCord, J. M. Daggs, S. 
C. Kimball. G. A. Dodge, Geo. Aydelott, H. G. Lacey 
and J. D. Biddle. After the election the new board 
met and organized by electing the following officers: 
Geo. A. Dodge, President; S. C. Kimball, First Vice- 
President; Geo. Aydelott, Second Vice-President; J. 
W. McCord, Third Vice-President. The matter of 
electing a secretary and a treasurer was laid over 
until the next meeting. 



Now that Phoenix. Arizona, has made such a 
great success with its fall harness races, the live 
town of Tucson wants to be a member of the warm 
climate circuit and proposes to hold a meeting next 
year that will be worth going to with good horses. 



Mr. H. Le Baron Smith, who does business in San 
Francisco, but. resides in Oakland, is taking much 
pleasure these days in driving over the splendid 
roads of Alameda county a nice bay mare by Alta- 
mont (sire of Chehalis 2:04%, etc.), that is begin- 
ning to show speed. She is well bred on her dam's 
sire, tracing back to old Fanny Fern by Irwin's 
Tuckahoe, and has a license to pace, but so far she 
is a four-cornered trotter. This mare was bred 
and raised by Mr. F. W. Perkins of Oakland, owner 
of that handsome stallion Athamax 2:22% by Atha- 
don. 



A letter to this journal from Mr. A. G. Fell of 
Ogden, Utah, conveys the information that he has 
had his fast stallion, I. Direct 2:12%, registered, 
under rule 1, and his number is 44345, and his name 
will appear in Volume XVII.. which will be out this 
year. I Direct is wintering well, and Mr. Fell says 
he is in better shape than ever. A fine picture and 
write-up of this son of Direct 2:05% appears in the 
Christmas number of the Chicago Horse Review, oc- 
cupying an entire page. It states that Mr. Fell will 
start him this fall to reduce his record. 



Mr. E. D. Roberts of San Bernardino, Cal., is the 
owner of a very handsome two-year-old called Arrow 
Stanley, foaled May 8, 1905, sired by On Stanley 
(son of Direct 2:05%), dam Emaline by Electioneer; 
second dam Emma Robson by Woodburn. Arrow 
Stanley is standard and registered, and although 
technically two years old at the present time, will 
in reality not have completed its second year until 
.May 8th. 



Capt. N. P. Batchelder reports the loss of his 
fine two-year-old colt by Monterey 2:09% out of his 
old mare Luella, dam of Myrtle 2:13% and Prince 
Nutwood 2:12%, by Nutwood 600. The colt was a 
very handsome youngster with fine trotting action, 
and great things were expected of him, as he was 
well staked. His leg was broken in an accident 
and he had to be destroyed. 



Mary Mays by Mambrino Patchen, the dam of 

Ralph Wiikes 2:06%, was chlorformed by her 

owner Dr. Gal breath, at his farm recently. The old 
mare was foaled in 1887. 



In the holiday number of the American Horse 
Breeder appears an interesting table seting forth 
the number of sons of prominent sires, with the 
number of new performers. In this table it. may be 
learned that Electioneer and George Wilkes ran a 
close race during 1906, the latter being represented 
with thirty sons that sired eighty new performers, 
while the former had thirty sons that sired seven- 
nine performers. 



Fourteen yearling trotters were sold at Berlin, 
Germany, a short time ago, for $8,540, an average 
of $610. Prices like these would seem to indicate 
an opening for some enterprising American horse- 
man to export a lot of well-bred trotting mares in 
foal and sell them under the hammer on arrival in 
Germany. 



The ice racing season in Canada will soon be in 
full swing, the sport opening on New Year's day 
at Toronto and there being nearly two months of 
racing scheduled. 



What is a cob? In England the small, plump, 
handsome little horses somewhat of the hackney type 
are called cobs, and over in Germany and France 
most of the cobs come from England, and now that 
the name has come to America as one of the market 
type, many of our little trotters have their tails cut 
off. and at the sales are catalogued as cobs, but the 
buyers are deceived. A cross of the so-called hackney 
stallion on the smaller trotting-bred mares produce 
the cob type so popular at the horse shows. It is 
properly a horse not over fifteen hands high, and 
very strong according to his height, with unusual 
bone and substance and a big body on short legs 
with vigor, plenty of action and quality. They are 
used under the saddle as well as in harness. If they 
are over fifteen bands they are not, properly speak- 
ing, cobs. 



CORRECTIONS. 



In our Holiday edition the fee which will be asked 
for the services of the great young stallion McFadyen 
2:15%, owned by Mr. E. D. Dudley of Dixon, was 
given as $25, when it should have been $40. 

The fee asked for the services of Nearest McKin- 
ney, owned by Mr. T. W r . Barstow of San Jose, was 
also wrong. It should have been $50 instead of $40, 
with return privilege provided horse does not change 
ownership. 

o 

HAS A NEW HALF MILE TRACK. 



At La Siesta Ranch, Santa Clara county, Mr. 
Frank II. Burke has recently had a half-mile track 
built, on which his trainer, Pat Davey, will work 
the farm's trotters and pacers. Friday 2:11%, Val- 
lejo Girl 2:16% and others will be out again in 
1907. La Siesta Farm owns Wanda 2:14%, that 
was the first of the get of Eros to enter the list, and 
she in turn produced Search Me, the first of the get 
of the great Searchlight to get a record. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



Hugh Casey, Sacramento. — The pacer Billy Mayo 
took a record of 2:20 at Sacramento May 10, 1872. 
We do not know whether that was his first appear- 
ance in that city or not, or who owned him at the 
time. All our records of these old-time horses were 
destroyed in the fire of April last. The cost for 
shipping a horse to New York by rail would depend 
on whether he was one of a carload or occupied a 
car to himself, or went by freight, or express. 
Horses can be shipped to New York by water, but 
we do not believe any have been shipped for many 
years. 

o 

DEATH OF JAY BIRD. 



The great sire. Jay Bird, by George Wilkes, died 
at the farm of his owner, W. A. Bacon of Paris, Ken- 
tucky, a few days before Christmas, aged nearly 
twenty-nine years. He had sired up to the time of 
his death 108 standard performers, all but eleven of 
which were trotters. His most famous son is Aller- 
ton 2:09%, and his fastest trotter is Hawthorne 
2:06%. Jay Bird was a roan horse, having inherited 
that color from his grandam. Lady Franklin. Jay 
Bird was quite a colt trotter and won the Lexington 
Stake as a two-year-old in 18S0, but never tooK a 
record below 2:31%. The get of Jay Bird are noted 
for their gameness as race horses, and his family 
are known as a game family. 



-o- 



PILES CUBED IN 6 TO 14 DAYS. 

PAZO OINTMENT is guaranteed to cure any case 
of Itching, Blind, Bleeding or Protruding Piles In 6 to 
14 days or money refunded. 60c. 



Saturday, January 5, 1907] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



HORSE RACING WITH INDIANS. 

There is not a more interesting place in Montana 
than the Yellowstone Valley, and it contains more 
thrilling incidents of pioneer life than any other sec- 
tion of the State. Previous to the advent of the rail- 
road into Montana there was a never-ceasing rivalry 
between the Indians, on one side, and the settlers 
and the cowboys on the other. Early in the history 
of Montana it was learned that the Yellowstone val- 
ley was the best natural cattle range on earth. When 
the Yellowstone ranges were stocked, many of the 
cattle were killed by the Indians, fat calves being 
especially chosen by the red epicures, who would 
rather hunt the white man's buffalo than the Indian's 
cattle, which still roamed in that section by thou- 
sands. The cattlemen considered the filching of 
an occasional calf by the Crows as a matter of 
course, and charged it to the profit and loss account 
in the journal of the cow ranch, provided they kept 
any books save the one the foreman carried around 
in his pocket and in which he kept the time of the 
cow punchers. 

Despite the occasional thefts by the Crows the 
cowboys and the Indians got along nicely, and it 
was not long until the greater part of them were on 
good terms. The Crow Indians are the greatest 
sports in the world. They have been known to 
gamble away their horse and saddle and then put 
up their mocassins and blankets in the game. It is 
on record that they have gambled off their squaws, 
and if the stories which are told around Billings and 
some of the other "cow towns" of the Yellowstone 
are the truth, there are one or two leading citizens 
of the valley who at one time and another were the 
owners of half a dozen good-looking young squaws, 
whom they had won at the gambling table, or rather 
blanket. Tables were almost unknown in those days, 
the popular method to start a game being to spread 
a blanket on the ground and then squat down on 
your hunkers beside the impromptu gambling board 
and bluff for all you are worth, for the Indian is a 
hard one to beat and he always hated a "quitter." 

But it is a horse-racing story that was told in 
Butte the other night in a group of old-timers of 
the range, as they hugged the bar of a popular re- 
sort that is to be printed, and here is the story as it 
was reeled off by one of the veterans of the spurs 
and quirt, who has handled a herd, ridden bronchos 
and mavericked calves all of the way from Texas to 
the international boundary line. "I had been work- 
ing in the Yellowstone National Park in the sum- 
mer of '80," he said, "when I got a message from 
one of my old chums on the trail that if I had 
something that could run a quarter of a mile in about 
23 seconds to bring it down there; that the Crows 
were getting quite chesty over the sprinting ability 
of a wall-eyed pinto which was owned by one of the 
sub-chiefs and which had succeeded in cleaning up 
everything that was owned by the cowboys of that 
section of the country. 

"I had just the sort of horse the boys down on 
the Yellowstone wanted— rather, I was interested in 
her, she being held in partnership between my 
brother and myself. We called her Sweetheart, and 
she jpas not only the speediest, but she was the 
prettiest piece of horseflesh ever in that section of 
the country. I had a brief talk with the 'kid,' showed 
him my letter, and after sleeping on the matter we 
concluded to take up the 'proposition, and giving 
an answer to the Indian courier, who had 'smelled' 
us out in the Park, we told him to hasten back to 
old Coulson — where Billings stands to-day — and tell 
our cowboy friend we would leave the Park in about 
a week. 

"Well, we did so. We took it leisurely down the 
Yellowstone. Finally we reached the camp of the 
HA outfit and struck the foreman for a job. He 
never batted an eye when he told us we could turn 
our saddles into the 'covvy' and picked us out a 
couple of 'stringe' of saddle hcrses. Although he 
had known us since we were kids, it was not his 
policy to let any one know the fact. 

"Sweetheart had not fared very well during the 
trip. When we got to the round-up her back was 
sore from the chafing of the pack-saddle, and the 
hair was sawed off her in a number of places, but 
at no place where a sore would hurt her sprinting 
abilities. Her mane was tangled and ragged and it 
looked as if a rat had been chewing at her tail. 
Her eyes and nose were filled with alkali dust and, 
taking it altogether, she was as tough a looking 
race horse as ever looked through a bridle. 

"The first day we were in camp the foreman 
quietly suggested that I should ride the mare and 
accompany him, over to look at a mudhole a few 
miles away from camp. After we were out of sight 
an earshot of the camp he indignantly demanded 
what under the sun I wanted to bring a plug like 
the black mare down to clean up the Crows. 'Why, 
boy," he said, 'this old skate I am riding can choke 
that thing you are on to death with 100 feet of 
rope,' was his indignant kick. 

" 'Bet yer a $20 gold piece that you can't keep 
in sight of my dust in a 400-yards dash,' was my 
reply. 

'Take you up, sonny. Lay your money down on 
this rock and we will step off 400 yards and then 
mount and race for this cash. The first one to get 
here takes both gold pieces, was his proposition. 

"In less time that it takes to tell about it the 
race was on. The HA horse could run a little bit 
and the foreman had the better of the start, for 
Sweetheart's sore back made her rather peevish 
about mounting, and when I was finally in the saddle 



the foreman was fully fifty yards away and fairly 
making his quirt ring as he brought it down over 
the hind legs of his old skate. 

"Sweetheart saw that a race was in progress and 
in the next 200 yards she had overtaken the other 
horse and passed him just like he was standing still. 
Pulling up just before the rock upon which the two 
20's were left, I leaned over and thrust them into 
my pocket, thinking the foreman might 'beef because 
of the way he'd allowed the mare to take him in. But 
he didn't. He pulled up laughing, with the saluta- 
tion: 'Your mare is all right, boy; I was only trying 
you. Now I have a line on how she can run, and I 
guess we will clean up every Indian in the Yellow- 
stone valley who imagines he knows the least thing 
about horse racing.' 

"And we did. There is no use going into details 
regarding the different races run during the next two 
months, for the Indians were determined to beat us, 
and every pony for miles around was tried against 
the little black mare, who was never headed. At 
first the Indians purposely allowed her to win, hoping 
to get up a bigger race afterward. But the 'kid,' 
who always rode the mare, was just as foxy as any 
Indian in the country, and he would only allow the 
little mare to extend herself sufficiently to beat out 
the opposing horse by a neck or so, always making 
the race close enough to lead the Indians to believe 
it was an accident rather than the merit of the mare 
that won the race. 

"Finally, we had beaten the best of the Crow 
ponies, and as a final race just as we were ready 
to return to our homes in order to attend to our own 
little horse round-up before winter time, we re- 
ceived still another proposition on behalf of the 
Crows, to race with the blue-roan champion pony of 
the Cheyennes, which had been brought nearly 200 
miles to meet our champion. Now, we were pretty 
chary about taking up the proposition, as none of us 
had ever gotten a line on the sprinting ability of 
the blue. 

"We hung back a little bit and then the Crows 
began deriding us, calling us squaws and asserting 
that we were not game. That settled it, and we 
made a race for $500 a side, payable in ponies, for 
we had about 100 head of Crow ponies which we had 
won during the time we were on the round-up — that 
is, we rounded up cattle when we were not racing 
horses. We had won a considerable larger number of 
horses than 100, but the Crows being expert horse 
thieves stole the animals back almost as fast as we 
won them, and I remember distinctly having won one 
peculiarly marked bay horse six times during a 
single month. 

"Well, to return to the race. We won it easily 
and we virtually broke the entire camp of Crows 
and Cheyennes in doing so. The blue roan proved to 
be a dub, and couldn't run fast enough to keep warm. 
Some of the bucks were so certain of winning that 
they wagered their squaws and sisters with the 
cow punchers, even offering to bet two squaws 
against one saddle. When the race was over, there 
was the biggest kind of a howl, the Indians asserting 
that their pony had been 'doped,' and they refused 
point blank to give up the stakes, which were piled 
at the end of the race track, as was the custom. 
Even the Indians who had bet on the race refused 
to pay, and for a while there was nearly an outbreak 
of hostilities; guns being drawn and knives flashed. 

"One of the other boys who lived in our section, on 
the advice of the foreman, concluded to make the 
home journey with us. It is well he did so. We 
had got out of the camp and were gone for two days 
before the Crows learned we had left with the mare. 
Then they followed, but we had a good start, and it 
was not until he had made nearly a hundred miles 
on the home trip that they got in sight of 
our dust. We spotted them almost as soon as they 
saw us and took precautions. 

"We knew it was Sweetheart they were after, and 
one of us never left her side. We used to take turns 
in holding her halter rope while we camped over 
night. The very first night the Crows came up with 
us they stole back all of the ponies we had won, and 
they tried their best to get our saddle horses, but we 
were too watchful. They would have murdered us if 
they dared, but we were too prominent figures with 
the cowboys of that section and they knew it would 
be a relentless war if they did so. 

"One night a big buck actually stole Sweetheart's 
halter rope from my hand as I slept and hold it, and 
had it not been for her snorting in disgust at the 
smell of the Indian — she always did hate them — I 
would have lost her. Sweetheart's snort brought me 
wide awake and I had just time to whack the Indian 
across the face with my quirt and compel him to 
drop the rope, in this manner saving myself from 
disgrace. 

"It was this way every night and day. The Crows' 
thieves hung around us all of the time, and it was not 
until we reached the Gallatin valley that they left us 
in peace, even then declaring that they would tell 
the Bannocks and have them steal the mare for them 
out of our own stable. But the Bannocks never had 
the courage to attempt it, and the next summer Sweet- 
heart was killed by a big black bear in the Yellow- 
stone Park while we were doing some stunts for the 
tourists, and also raking in a few dollars from visitors 
who Imagined they hal horses which could sprint, 
some." — Anaconda Standard. 

o 

A Frenchman, interested in the trotter, delivered 
himself of the following and his words now form part 
of the French trotting gospel: "Hopples, grotesque 
American interlacement, persuasion by force, a short 
season of victory, an embarrassed horse, a fall and 
no value afterwards." 



CHARLEY BELDEN 2:08' 2 . 



Charley Belden 2:08%, the grand trotter that was 
the star of Chas. De Ryder's stable last season, raced 
eleven times and was never unplaced. Belden was 
raced on a lease held jointly by De Ryder and Frank 
Jermyn. Mr. Jermyn has owned many good horses 
and lias on other occasions displayed excellent judg- 
ment in campaigning them. His home is in Scranton, 
Pa., but he usually spends his winters in California. 
While at Pleasanton last winter he was struck with 
Charley Belden and tried to purchase him from bis 
owner, the well-known horseman, Mart Rollins, but 
deeming the price prohibitive, effected his lease. 
The result of Belden's campaining was most rati- 
fying to Mr. Jermyn, who, by the way, had the pleas- 
ure of seeing the horse win two $5,000 stakes. 

De Ryder opened his campaign at Cedar Rapids. 
Ia., June 14, at which place Belden won third money 
in the 2:35 trot, it being the first race of his life. He 
was second at Decorah and won two races at Water- 
loo. At Mason City, la?, he also won two races, and 
at Albert Lea, Minn., one. Then going to Clinton. 111., 
his first start over a mile track, where he won two 
heats and second money, Early Alice 2:09%, taking 
the race. Second money also fell to him at Pekin, 111., 
also at Galesburg, where he took his record of 2:08%, 
in the second heat, losing the race to the great four- 
year-old Gulvallis Directum 2:09%. Journeying to 
Dubuque, la., he turned the tables on Gulvallis Direc- 
utm, but met defeat when he struck Bi-Flora in the 
$2,500 2:35 trot at Hamline, winning, however, second 
money. This race evidently had sharpened him up, 
for later in the same week he won the $5,000 Minne- 
apolis stake in straight heats from a field of seven- 
time, 2:09%, 2:11, 2:10— lowering the record of this 
famous Northwestern classic. The following week at 
Milwaukee he again started in a $5,000 stake, meeting 
the great mare Early Alice 2:09% and nine others. 
The race was bitterly contested, Belden winning the 
first heat, but losing the second to Talpa in 2:09%. 
Early Alice took the third and Belden the fourth. 
While the mare beat him back in the fifth heat, he 
stood best in the summary and won first money. 
The next $5,000 stake in which he engaged was at 
Libertvville, 111. Here he resumed his battle with 
Early Alice, being beaten, but finishing a close second 
in 2:10%, 2:09%, 2:09% in a stirring contest. En- 
countering a soft track at Cincinnati, he was beaten 
by Lilly R. 2:08% and Belle Isle 2:11, but finished a 
close second in the last two heats. In the Transyl- 
vania he won fourth money, finishing 12-6-3. At the 
critial point in this race he was badly interfered with, 
causing him to lose all chance of winning. 

Now, for the first time in fourteen consecutive 
weeks, during which he has trotten nineteen races, 
he was given a let up. But just to show that he had 
not forgoten the game, when he reached Phoenix, 
Ariz., four weeks later, he set a new record for the 
Territory, winning his race in straight heats in, 2:09%, 
2:12%, 2:09%. His campaign closed at Los Angeles, 
Cal., Nov. 24, just five months and ten days after it 
had begun in Iowa. To celebrate his return to the 
State of his nativitity, he won in straight heats, trot- 
ting one of them over a slow track and on a bad day 
in 2:10, bring his years earnings up to $10,440. 

Charley Belden is a seven-year-old gelding of fine 
appearance and striking elegance, but possessed also 
of a lot of substance. He raced in high flesh and 
lcoked like a Ehcvwing winner at the close of his 
great campaign. He is by Lynwood H., 2, 2:20%, son 
of Guy Wilkes 2:15%, and his dam is Juanita Skinner, 
by Silas Skinner 2: 17.— Christmas Horse Review. 

— o 

THE DAM OF ITALIA 2:04^. 



W. C. McCuliy, of Bloomington, Cal., recently wrote 
the following interesting leter to Mr. W. Murray, of 
Cleveland, owner of Italia 2:04%, bj Zombro, 

"Bloomington, Cal., Dec. 19, 1906. 
Mr. W. P. Murray, Cleveland, Ohio: 

Dear Sir. — Having seen your name mentioned in 
the Horseman as the owner of the Zombro mare. 
Italia, dam of Concha, by A. W. Richmond, I take Ibis 
liberty of addressing you. 

I am the present owner of Concha, dam of your 
mare and I thought it might interest you to learn 
that I have? succeeded in registering the old mare and 
that your mare is now eligible for registration as a 
standard bred mare. 

I have the old mare safely in foal to my young 
stallion Cedric Mac by Nearest, own brother to the 
great John A. McKerron. and have booked her for 
the coming season to Audubon Hoy. 

It is some what interesting to look over Concha's 
budding, on her dam's side: First dam Paganip by 
Crichton by Imp Gleneoe; second dam Hay G. by 
Argyle by a thoroughbred; third dam by Son of Jo- 
seph by Joseph, thoroughbred; fourth dam, Fast Cali- 
fornia quarter mare by a thoroughbred. Concha, dam 
of Italia 2:04%, Rego 2:15, Amber 2:18 Henry N. 
2:20%, Conchita 2:18%, Julia M. 2:13% and I have a 
three-year-old by Neernut that will trot to 2:10 as a 
five-year-old barring accidents. Hut one cannot won- 
der at the performances of their colts when they look 
over the thronghbred blood riming through her veins 

I was greatly interested and pleased with the work 
of Italia this season and therefore believe you will 
be glad to hear from the mother relative to her having 
been registered. 

Very truly yours, 

W. C. MoCULLY." 

o 

Tucson will hold a three days' meeting, beginning 
February 22<1, and will gUe three purses of $300 
each for harness horses. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 5, 1907 



JURY AWARDS ZIBBELL $100,000. 



(Fresno Republican. Dec. 30.) 



Willard R. Zibbell was awarded $100,000 against 
the South ren Pacific Railroad by a Fresno jury De- 
cember 29th. Lawyers say it is the largest verdict 
for personal damages ever awarded in the United 
States. It was conceded that the railroad company 
expected a heavy verdict, but nothing like that re- 
turned, the jury awarding practically the full meas- 
ure of damages asked. The case will be appealed 
by the railroad, which will fight the heavy verdict 
as long as there is a court to appeal to. 

The verdict was returned at 7 o'clock and its read- 
ing by Foreman Rurnett caused a sensation in the 
court room. The jury had been out for two hours. 
The jury was unanimous from the beginning in favor 
of a verdict for the plaintiff, but for about an hour 
debated whether the award should be of $100,000 or 
$Ki2.000, the full amount asked. The jury finally 
decided on $100,000 as the amount. Attorney L. L. 
Cory for the defense then* asked for a sixty days' 
stay of execution of the judgment and Judge Church 
granted the request. 

Wiliard Zibbell, the plaintiff in the case, was feel- 
ing very happy over the outcome of the trial when 
interviewed Thursday evening. He said, in com- 
menting on the case and his plans for the future: 
"I believe the jurors realized the terrible sufferings 
through which I have gone since the accident, and 
the helpless condition in which I really am, in spite 
of my ability to walk around. Now that, the strain 
of the trial is over, I feel that I can look forward 
with pleasant anticipations into the future. My 
father expects to move to Fresno from Modesto in 
two or three weeks and will open a livery stable 
business in this city. I will join with him in the 
enterprise, and while I will not be able to do any 
active work about the place. I will have something 
to which I can devote my attention and occupy my 
mind. We have five horses at Modesto, which we 
will bring to the stable in Fresno. One reason for 
our moving to this place is that we will have the 
advantage of training the horses on the track here. 
We have Adam G., a fine trotter, with a record of 
2:11V4; Miss Foxy; Teddy Mac, a speedy three-year- 
old trotter, and Catalina and Little Angie, promising 
two-year-olds. 

"I am now assisting in the office of the Runyon 
Sign Company, on South Main street, in Los Angeles, 
and will go to that city on Monday to make arrange- 
ments to give up that work. I understand that the 
railroad company will appeal the case to the Supreme 
Court, and so it will be about two years before we 
get the money awarded to us by the jury. 

"I am confident that we will win the appeal before 
the Supreme Court, as I believe that the testimony 
clearly shows that the railroad company was re- 
sponsible for the accident and that I did all that 
any reasonable man would be required to do in 
crossing the Tulare street tracks." 

Attorney Theo. Roche said in regard to the ver- 
dict: ' I think that we were entitled to the award 
as made, considering the great extent of Mr. Zib- 
bell's injuries. I believe that the Supreme Court 
will uphold the verdict as presented by the jury, as 
the plea of contributory negligence on the part of 
the plaintiff will not avail in this case, and there is 
no just reason why the Supreme Court should not 
award us $100,000 damages as well as $10,000 or 
$20.0110, if the latter amounts had been decided on. 
The verdict is the largest award of damages that 
has ever been made in the United States." 

Attorney L. L. Cory, for the defense, stated con- 
cerning the verdict: "I do not believe that the Su- 
preme Court will allow any such verdict to stand. 
We have been granted a stay of execution of the 
award for sixty days, and shall immediately take 
steps to prepare a bill of exceptions as a basis for 
a motion for a new trial of the case. If Judge Church 
denies the motion for a new trial, we will then appeal 
the case to the Supreme Court on Judge Church's 
order denying a new trial of the case. The verdict 
is the result of prejudice and passion directed against 
the railroad company. We will ask the Supreme 
Court to order a new trial of the case on the ground 
that the damages awarded are excessive in amount, 
and second, that the plaintiff caused the accident 
and the terrible injuries which he received by his 
own contributory negligence and want of care." 

At the opening of the morning session, Attorney 
Ewing commenced his argument in behalf of the 
plaintiff and reviewed the case as to many of its 
aspects. He contended that the testimony of the 
witnesses for the defense showed noticeable varia- 
tions from the testimony given by the same witness- 
es at the coroner's inquest along several lines: that, 
for example. Foreman Williams of the switching 
crew, testified at the inquest that the freight train 
did not stop in coming from the lead onto the Tulare 
street crossing, but testified at the trial that the 
train came to a stop at the switch before proceeding 
to the crossing. The witnesses Hamilton. Pope and 
Williams also varied considerably in their statements 
at the inquest and at the trial as to the distance 
of the front box car of the train from the switch 
when Williams first gave the signal for the train 
to slow down, and also as to the point at which Wil- 
liams first got onto the front box car with his lan- 
tern. The attorney argued that Williams stated at 
the inquest that he rode on the car up to the switch, 
but testified at the inquest that he walked along 
ahead of the train up to the switch. 

Mr. Ewing also argued that the testimony of the 
majority of the witnesses in the case showed that 
there was no lantern on the front of the box car 
as it came out of the lead onto the crossing, that 



the bell on the engine was not ringing and that no 
other warning was given to Zibbell and McMahon 
which could have made them aware of the approach 
of the freight train in the darkness of the night. 
Mr. Ewing, continuing, said: "We have the testi- 
mony of such well known residents of this city as 
S. B. Tombs, G. W. Hensley and J. D. Patterson, 
who have all resided in Fresno for the past twenty 
years or more, that they did not know of the pres- 
ence of the lead near the Tulare street crossing until 
the evening of Friday, December 21st, when the rail- 
road experiments were made in the switching yards, 
and the railroad attorney and officials pointed out 
the lead to them. The testimony in the case clearly 
shows that the plaintiff, Zibbell, took s])eeial pre- 
cautions in looking out for cars, as he walked across 
the Tulare street crossing with McMahon. and that 
the accident happened as a result of the negligence 
of the railroad company and its employes."' 

Attorney Cory for the defense, in his argument, 
claimed that Zibbell had been negligent and care- 
less, while crossing the railroad tracks on the night 
of the accident, and that if he did not see the freight 
train approaching from the lead', he should have 
seen it when it was a considerable distance away. 
Mr. Cory continued on this line of thought: "Police- 
men McSwain and Bradley, who were both called 
as witnesses for the plaintiff, testified as a result 
of witnessing an experiment with a freight train in 
the switching yards, that they could see the train 
approaching on a dark night when it was 100 feet 
away from them. If these men could see the freight 
train coming when it was that distance away, Zib- 
bell ought to have been able to see the train when 
it was 100 or ISO feet away from him. if he looked 
up and down the railroad track as he testified that 
he did. As a matter of fact, I believe that Zibbell 
erred in the testimony which he gave in this trial; 
that he was trying to explain to himself and to you 
how the accident happened, and to account for the 
terrible injuries which he received. The plaintiff. 
Zibbell. and his father, J. W. Zibbell. testified that 
the young man had been offered a salary of $2500 
a year to train and drive horses on the race Crack, 
but there is no certainty that he would have received 
this amount for more than one year. So the plain- 
tiff's method of taking Zibbell's expectancy of life 
as 37 years longer, and then multiplying that by 
$2500, giving $92,500, with additional amounts bring- 
ing the total up to $102,085.75 for the damages sought, 
is, to my mind, an incorrect and unwarranted way 
of calculating on the case. 

"The Supreme Court has set aside a number of 
verdicts against corporations which were excessive, 
and this jury should see to it by any verdict that 
they may render that they do not bring in an ex- 
cessive or unfair verdict in the case at issue." 

In the afternoon session Attorney Theo. J. Roche 
presented his argument for the plaintiff before a 
large number of listeners, and made an eloquent 
plea for justice for the victim of the terrible acci- 
dent, which is the basis of the suit. He congratulated 
Judge Church upon the fairness of his decisions in 
the trial and the jury upon the patience with which 
they had sat through the long hours of testimony 
in the case. 

In the course of his argument. Attorney Roche 
said: "The plaintiff in this case came to this city 
in July, 1905, in the full hope and expectancy of 
a sturdy youth. He was intelligent, athletic, of a 
strong constitution and was considered one of the 
best drivers and trainers of race horses in the United 
States. That night he was suddenly stricken down 
and terribly injured by a Southern Pacific railroad 
freight train while he was walking along Tulare 
street, across the railroad tracks, as any citizen had 
a right to do. His promised bride, an intelligent 
and accomplished young lady of San Francisco, was 
soon notified of the mishap and, with unparalleled 
heroism and loyalty to her vows, became his wife 
three weeks after the young man was so suddenly 
and so severely injured. The testimony in this case 
shows that it was through no fault or negligence of 
the plaintiff that he was run down by the freight 
(rain, but that the railroad company and its em- 
ployes were responsible for the accident which oc- 
curred. 

"1 want to call your attention to one striking fact 
in this case, and that is that the railroad company 
did not dare to put on the stand Yardmaster Conley 
or Brakeman Wills of the Mendota train. These 
men were both eye-witnesses to the accident which 
killed McMahon and maimed Willard Zibbell for 
lue, but the defense knew that if they put these 
witnesses on the stand and they told the truth, they 
would have to give an account of the mishap which 
would support the contentions of the plaintiff in the 
suit. You. gentlemen of the jury, know as reason- 
able men. that pedestrians have a right to cross the 
railroad tracks on Tulare street in the day time or 
at night: that if you attempted to cross the tracks 
on the night of July 12, .1905, you would have taken 
the same precautions and acted in the same manner 
as did Willard Zibbell when he was run down by 
the freight train at the crossing. Let this plaintiff 
go back to his home in Los Angeles feeling that he 
has received the justice meted out by a jury of 
American citizens. Let this gray-haired Father, 
when the time conies, as it will in a few years, 
that his days are numbered, know that by your ver- 
dict you have provided for the young man's necessi- 
ties for the rest of his life, so that he need not spend 
his days of helplessness in a poor house." 

Judge Church began reading his instructions at 
1:00 and it required a little over half an hour for 
the reading. The case was submitted to the jury 
ai 5:05 and the verdict was at 7 o'clock. 



LETTER FROM McKINNEY'S OWNER. 



New York. December 31st, 1906. 

To the Editor of the Breeder and Sportsman — In 
1901 my purchase of McKinney 2:11*4 was the occa- 
sion of considerable interest on the part of horsemen 
generally, and the patronage that the public has given 
this horse has been very gratifying to me. 

My intention was to maintain a training stable and 
to race a considerable number of McKinney's colts, 
but I have found that it will be much more satisfac- 
tory to me to give up training and concentrate my 
attention upon breeding. 

My purchase of Axworthy 2:15% was for the pur- 
pose of owning the greatest sire of colt trotters as 
well as McKinney 2:11%, the greatest sire of 2:10 
trotters. 

By mating these most successful horses with the 
collection of great mares that I have gathered togeth- 
er and by carefully raising their colts and selling 
them as yearlings, I expect to give the public an 
opportunity to buy the best possible prospects and to 
distribute them amongst the most successful train- 
ers. At the same time 1 will be doing the very best 
I can for the future reputation of my own stallions 
and mares. 

K will be evident that without training, any colts 
that 1 might keep would be handicapped, and, there- 
fore, the only solution of the problem is to absolutely 
sell entire crops, not reserving any. 1 therefore ex- 
pect to sell my entire crop of 190G McKinney s before 
they are two years old and to do likewise with the 
future produce at the Empire City Farms. 

Realizing that there are many great mares, owned 
by others, that should be bred to my stallions, I will 
always accept a limited number of outside mares, 
which I approve of, at fees which are reasonable, 
considering the value and merits of my stallions. 
My facilities for taking care of mares and keeping 
'them in the best of condition are exceptional and 
the cost of so doing is considerably higher than when 
done in a haphazard manner. 

While some can book mares they fancy, even from 
a sentimental standpoint, just as I myself have often 
done, I am pleased to state that some of my most 
agreeable business relations have been with horse- 
men of limited means who have kept their stock in 
an economical way and produced profitable results. 

Assuring the public, of my appreciation of their 
liberal interest and patronage in the past and be- 
speaking for my stallions an impartial comparison 
with others, I remain. 

Very truly yours, 

WILLIAM SIMPSON. 

o 

PLEASANTON NEWS. 



(From the Times.) 

Jack Phippen has a string of horses at the track 
that came in this week. Phippen was one of Gov- 
ernor Stanford's trainers at the world famous Palo 
Alto Stock Farm for a long time. Also trained at 
the old San Jose track lately. 

Ben Chaboya was in town last Tuesday to attend 
the funeral of his mother who died here quite sud- 
denly. Ben is taking a respite from the horse busi- 
ness lately after many years in the sulky. Begin- 
ning as a second trainer to Saunders for Valensin 
and was then the trainer for the Oakwood Park 
Stock Farm for seven or eight years, and later 
trained in Pleasanton. Ben has many friends here. 

George Johnson has his gray horse in training this 
season and with very little work showed an eighth 
in 16% seconds at the end of a good mile. This 
horse is bred as good as any of them and we would 
like to see him get to the races. and bring home 
some of the money. Mr. Johnson has recently 
bought a promising three-year-old. 

II. H. Dunlap is the proud possessor of a fine 
new pair of hopples made by C. W. Towson of 
Cleveland, Ohio, whfo has opened business under 
the bell stand at the track. Mr. Towson came out 
to California to see if its so about our winter sun- 
shine here. He is a fine workman and has owned 
horses himself and knows what they need. He 
makes a quarter boot of his own design that is 
getting to be a favorite. 

Mr. Sutherland drove a two-year-old colt by Search- 
light, dam Ruth C, that belongs to Lou Crellin, a 
quarter in 35 seconds a few days ago. This colt 
never saw harness until about six weeks ago and 
didn't like it much when he saw it. Anybody who 
will admit anything at all will admit that Mr. Suth- 
erland can get more speed out of a green one, and 
quicker than any other man in the business. 

o 

For the first time since trotting horses and trotting- 
races were introduced in Germany the purses offered 
there this year aggregated 1,000,000 marks, or about 
$250,000. In 1901 the total amount distributed was 
$150,000, an increase of $100,000 having thus taiken 
place in the last five years. There were ninety-two 
days of harness racing in 190C, when 533 events were 
decided. 



The Wisconsin State Fair will start off for 1907 
with $30,000 in the treasury. This financial condi- 
tion is the best the State Fair has been in for many 
years. Secretary True's figures for the recent ex- 
hibition show the receipts were $89,475 and the ex- 
penses $73,340, giving net profits of $10,135. In ad- 
dition there is due from the State $10,000. This, 
with the balance in the treasury, will give the State 
Agricultural Board more than $30,000 with which to 
prepare for the next fair. Many more improvements 
in the grounds are contemplated. 



Saturday, January 5, 1907] 



THE BREEDER 



AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



METHUSALAH'S ADVICE. 



My son incline thine ear to my word and take heed 
to my sayings: 

Thou seest an ad in thy turf paper which readeth 
well as follows: 

For sale — Pacer-record, 2:10. Can beat it 3 times 
on one-half mile track. Sound, handsome and kind. 
Price, $200.00. 

Thou readest it carefully and long. Thou thinkest. 
gee whiz! He sure can step and is cheap, but thou 
takest not into consideration that thy danger lieth 
in this cheap price. Thou cuttest out the ad and 
putteth it in thy vest pocket. Thou writest to the 
owner as follows: 

Dear Sir: If the passer is as you describ an he 
is soun and hansom and he can step three times bet- 
ter than 2:10 I will give you $100.00 for heem. An- 
swer. 

In two days there cometh an answer which readeth 
as follows: 

Dear Friend: I was mighty glad to hear from 
you about my pacer. Now the truth is I am con- 
fined to the house with a fever and am not strong 
enough to handle such a good horse and I have got 
to sell him right away as I have promised my wife 
not to take any chances. Now this horse is a cracker- 
jack and can step half mile track better than 2:10 
right out of the pasture. He is sound and handsome. 
Has the best set of feet and legs you ever saw, but 
I can't sell him for no $100.00 as he is worth more 
money but I tell you what I will do and that's all I 
will do I will split the difference with you. Now 
if you want him speak quick as there are 14 others 
after him now. Yours truly Bill Jones. 

Thou readest the letter eighteen times; yea verily 
during the sermon in church dost thou pull it from 
thy pocket and while thy wife, Mary, doseth, thou 
wilest away the time in unholy thoughts of how thou 
canst rub it into Smith when thy new purchase ar- 
riveth but thou knowest all the time that there lieth 
underneath this description a something which is 
wrong, but thou readest again and seeth plainly that 
the man states "2:10 sure — sound and hansom" and 
thou again lapseth into pleasant thought of how 
thou willst bet Smith *10,000 that thou canst distance 
him in one half. Thy wife, Mary, snoreth out loud 
and it is necessary to awaken her before thy neighbor 
noticeth and thy letter is put away until the mor- 
row. 

After many misgivings thou showest the letter to 
Mary, thy wife. She readeth it. she looketh at thee 
with pity and sayeth: "Dear John, I pray thee come 
back to earth. Thinkest thou this fellow has a horse 
that is so fast at such a price. He fair would cheat 
thee, John." ova/^v. ^otma?a3 io 

Thou gettest mad at once and sayeth hard things 
to Mary, thy wife. Thou goest to the livery stable 
where thou meetest other fools and there thou hear- 
est during the evening that a really good horse pos- 
sesseth value and thou at last maketh up thy mind 
to see the horse before buying. 

Thou goest home and telleth Mary to hurry with 
thy satchel. Thou sheddest a tear, saying: Yea. 
verily, Mary, mine Uncle James lieth at the point of 
death and I must hie me to him. 

Mary packeth thy grip, but she sheddeth no tears 
for Uncle Jas. and after thy departure she telegraph- 
eth to learn the state of Uncle's health, which she 
findetA is good. 

Thou arrivest at thy destination and findeth where 
thy man liveth by asking the barber on the corner. 
Thou also asketh of him regarding the pacer and he 
telleth you: Yea, verily, my friend Jones' pacer 
goeth fast. He beateth all others hereabouts and 
the horsemen here all considereth him a cyclone. 

Thou art much encouraged at this report but thou 
failest to hear thy barber friend call up Jones on 
the phone, saying: "Hello, Bill, get the cripple ready; 
there cometh a sucker that will buy and don't forget 
my commission." 

Thou findest that thy barber friend hath misdirect- 
ed thy footsteps and it taketh an hour to find Jones' 
house. Thou knockest at the door and Mrs. Jones 
cometh. She openeth the door one inch. Sticketh 
her nose out and demandeth: "What yer want?" 
Thou asketh if Bill Jones resideth there and if he 
hath a pacing horse and she sayeth: "Yessir, this 
be the place but I jes told Bill not ter sell that there 
pacer for less than $1000 an' he ought to get $2000 
fer him but Bill's porely and I reckon he better sell." 
She calleth Bill loudly and he cometh leaning on a 
cane and he certainly looketh sick and thou art sorry 
for his misfortune but, old fool, thou failest to note 
that Bill's hands are hardened and callous. That 
his cane on which he leaneth is new and shiny. That 
his boots are heavily coated with cow manure and 
that Bill smelleth strongly of same. Thou also faileth 
to note that Bill's team standeth hitched to wagon 
by the barn, and the absence of a hired man thou 
seest not. Bill shaketh hands and sayeth: "Come 
right in and set down." He also winketh at his 
better half, saying: "Matilda, bring us some of that 
there sweet cider." Thou chattest with Hill regard- 
ing his poor health while the cider cometh. Thou 
drinkest heartily of same and remarketh of its fine 
taste. Thou goest to the barn and Jones bringeth 
out the pacer. He cometh forth with much life and 
looketh good to thee. He hath a fine tail, which he 
carrieth high. Thou art not versed in spices and 
detecteth not ginger. He steppeth high but Bill can- 
not run with him for illness and thou darest not take 
hold as Bill's cider hath worked overtime, and thou 
feelest thyself a trifle unsteady. Thou also failest to 
see a soak tub and many bottles in the barn and 
thine eye seest not what it should, but thy heart 
goeth to Bill and thou taketh the horse. 

Thou arrivest home late at night. Thy wife Mary 



greeteth thee not. She feinteth sound sleep. Next 
morning she inquireth regarding the health of Uncle 
James and thou sayest he was much improved when 
thou cameth. 

Thou feelest mean and small but thou thinkest of 
thine horse and feeleth better. Thy horse arriveth 
and thou waitest till dark and taketh him home. 
The next day thou sayest to Mary, thy wife: 
"My dear, I have bought a gentle horse which thou 
canst drive," and Mary replieth saying: "Thank 
you, John! Thou hast better first drive thy new 
purchase thyself and see that he steppeth in 2:10," 
and she then showeth you a telegram from Uncle 
James which readeth: "Never felt better in my 
life." 

Thou feelest like thirty cents and goeth forth with 
thy new horse to find Smith. Thine horse driveth 
well but when thou meeteth Smith and calleth on 
him for speed he then showeth thee that he is an 
outlaw. Smith goeth past thee on the pace and thou 
strikest thy horse with thy whip. He starteth to run 
and thou canst not hold him. Thou canst not run 
as fast as Smith's horse paces, and thy horse thinketh 
the road is not wide enough and starteth for the side- 
walk. He runneth over a peanut stand and knocketh 
down the minister. The buggy he leaveth on the 
first telegraph pole and thou thyself shootest head- 
long through a plate glass window and landeth be- 
hind the bar of the Always Open saloon. Thy horse 
continueth his mad race, doing much damage, for 
which thou must pay. Thy head is badly cut and 
thy clothes are torn. The barkeep calleth an ambu- 
lance and thou art taken to thy house. Mary, thy 
wife, meeteth the stretcher at thy front door, saying: 
"Verily, John, thou didst split the difference and thy 
head as well." 

Now, mine son, take heed unto these words: Buy 
not from strangers their cheap horses. The price 
of 2:10 speed is counted not by hundreds, but by 
thousands. Mary, thy wife, hath sense. Yea. Verily, 
much more than thyself even unto a horse deal. — The 
Speed Bulletin. 

o 

A STORY OF BOSTON BLUE. 



In the summer of 1820 an advertisement appeared 
in a paper published in Boston in which the Boston 
Jockey Club offered to give a purse of $1,000 to 
any horse which would trot a mile in three minutes, 
says a writer in the Boston Globe. 

The paper containing this announcement came to 
the notice of Orrin B. Palmer, who lived near Water- 
ville, Maine. 

A short time previous he had secured a rangey, 
close-cropped bay gelding, who had a slanting or very 
oblique shoulder and whose legs stood well under 
him. The horse stood about 15.2 hands and weighed 
nearly 1,000 pounds. Such is the description which 
Mr. Palmer gave to Mr. Hall C. Burleigh of Sassal- 
boro, who was an expert horseman and a breeder of 
prize Hereford cattle. 

The horse had been used for two seasons by David 
Nourse in towing scows and long boats up the Ken- 
nebec river from Augusta to Waterville. After Mr. 
Palmer had used the horse a little while he found 
he had a trotter with a great burst of speed for those 
days, and privately timed him on the ice, where 
the footing was very smooth and solid. 

When the offer of the Jockey Club came to Mr. 
Palmer he determined to go to Boston and make a 
try for it. He immediately fixed up a gig out of 
an old pair of chaise wheels, and hitching his horse 
to it started for Boston. 

On his way he called on his brother-in-law at 
Exteter, N. H., and stopped over night. He said 
nothing of his business to Boston until morning, 
when he informed his brother-in-law what he was 
going for. The Exteter man was quick to catch the 
idea, and it was agreed that he should take a vessel 
and go to Boston with a big sum of money to bet 
on the horse. 

Mr. Palmer and the brother-in-law arrived in Bos- 
ton in good time. The horseman from the Kenne- 
bec soon made a match to beat three minutes with 
the approval of the Jockey Club. The trial came off 
over the Lynn turnpike, where a mile course was 
measured off. The gelding had been named Zuarrom. 
and by that name is he still known in the annals of 
early Maine trotters. 

In this race, to please someone's fancy, the horse 
was entered as Boston Blue. The traditions of early 
trotting around Lynn and Salem are to the effect 
that Boston Blue trotted a mile in better than three 
minutes. The race was made with competent judges 
at the start and finish, with two men on running 
horses accompanying the trotter to see that he did 
not indulge in breaks or try the running game him- 
self. A good deal of money was wagered on this 
first great trotting race near Boston, where time was 

vanquished. 

Mr. Palmer and his brother-in-law won more than 
$800, and the Jockey Club gave the $1,000 as they 
had agreed. The time of the mile was 2:57. 

Mr. Palmer sold the horse after the race to a gen- 
tleman of Boston, and there was a story about that 
he had been sent to England. 

In 1853 Mr. Palmer visited Hall ('. Burleigh at his 
home in Vassalboro and related the story as it now 
appears. There is no doubt as to Its authenticity, 
nor was the time considered fast by Mr. Palmer, who 
related that there were other horses in his vicinity 
near Waterville as fast or faster than the horse who 
was the first to demonstrate that a mile in three 
minutes was an easy thing. 

o 

California's favorite hot weather drink Is Jackson's 
Nairn Soda. i j 



MAKE THEM REGISTER. 



When the National Trotting Association makes 
and enforces a rule that shall disqualify all horses 
which are not registered from starting on associa- 
tion tracks, it will seriously interfere with the start- 
ing of horses in classes Blower than those to which 
they are eligible. The rule should require that i'i 
all cases a certificate be given when an animal is 
registered that shall bear the seal of the Register 
Association and should also require the secretary 
of the track or some other track official, specially ap- 
pointed for that purpose, to examine the certificate of 
each animal entered at his meeting before be : ng 
allowed to start. Whenever an animal chances 
owners the fact should be noted on the back of the 
certificate and this certificate should in every case 
pass to the new owner. — American Horse Breeder. 

The uprooting of the evil of ringing has never 
been very seriously considered by the National Trot- 
ting Association for the reason that the prominent 
members of that body are seldom, if ever, victimized 
by the rogues. When the matter comes up at the 
biennial sessions of the congress there is only a 
languid interest manifested. It has been shown that 
the present system of detection and punishment is 
almost wholly ineffective. Now, what can stop if 
Identification provided by the rule will not answer. 
No one of the miscreants starts out on a "ringing" 
tour nowadays without making provision to meet this 
feature of the code. Appropo to the above term from 
the American Horse Breeder, a dozen years ago or 
more we presented to the National Trotting Congress 
a rule which we thought would meet and overcome 
this great, evil. A magnate, in soft and persuasive 
tones, moved that it be "placed on file." It was 
in line with the rule suggested by the American 
Horse Breeder and in full, was as follows: 

No horse shall be eligible to perform on any track 
controlled by the National Trotting Association until 
the following conditions have been complied with: 
The nominator or owner shall file in the office of 
said association, under oath, and in the presence of 
two witnesses, permanent residents of the place in 
which the oath is made, a full and accurate descrip- 
tion, which shall embrace every feature of the 
horse — size, color, sey, distinguishing marks, and 
his record, when and where made. When such de- 
scription shall have been filed, and upon the payment 
of $1, the nominator or owner shall be furnished with 
an official certificate, made out and signed by the 
secretary or clerk designated to perform such duty. 
This certificate shall be renewed each and every 
year, and shall contain the name of the horse and 
the full description as recorded, and be provided 
with blank spaces to be filled in with the record (if 
any was made), and the place and date, and signed 
by- an officer of the course on which the horse last 
performed. This certificate shall be shown to any 
member or officer of the National Trotting Associa- 
tion or judges of a race, on demand, with a view 
to establishing the identity of a horse. A failure 
to comply will disqualify the horse. Any member 
found guilty of changing or forging a certificate shall 
be expelled. 

When a horse is sold a transfer of the certificate 
can be made by simple endorsement on the back. — 
Newark Call. 

o 

DEATH OF MAMBRINO CHIEF JR. 

Thos. Smith of Vallejo reports the death on De- 
cember 1 7th of his stallion Mambrino Chief Jr. 11622. 
The old horse was twenty-seven years old, but had 
been a lusty and vigorous horse up to this fall. 
He was a grand looking bay, bred by Rufus Ingalls 
Jr. of Belvidere. Illinois, and sold by him to C. Shilli- 
ber of Cordelia,- Cal., who in turn sold him to Mr. 
Smith. Mambrino Chief Jr. was by McDonald Chief 
out of a mare called Venus by Mambrino Patchen. 
He was the sire of four trotter" with standard rec- 
ords, and one of his sons sired three in the list. His 
four trotters are Dollican 2:15%, George Washing- 
ton 2:16%. Trilby 2:21% and Sweet Rosie 2:28%. 

His son, George Washington, is the sire of Stella 
2:15% and several others, and also sired the dam 
of Pat Rose 2:12%. Mambrino Chief Jr.. like his 
sire, McDonald Chief, also owned by Mr. Smith, was 
of great use in building up the horse sleek of Cali 
fornia, as they got size, good looks, square trotting 
action and great endurance as well as speed. 

o 

A SANTA ANA IDYL. 



Down the line, none can outshine 
This high-bred Lady Love of mine; 
She is game, they all have said; 
She is California bred. 

She's the queen of equine race. 
None can stand her awful pace. 
Moves just like a big machine 
When they put on all the steam 

See her coming 'round the turn. 
My Old Girl has speed to burn. 
Coming Strong and bold and true, 
Old clock stops at just. 2:02. 

Now she's left our golden shore, 
We shall never see her more. 
How we love her you can see, 
She's our honey — Sweet Marie. 

— WM. SINNOCK. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. It means health. 



[Saturday, January 5, 1907 



10 THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



% Conducted by J. X. DeWitt 



* 



AT THE TRAPS. 



A number of local shooters were at Ingleside last 
Sunday smashing blue-rocks. The attraction of the 
gun was too strong to make some of the boys "lay 
pit" for a day — the chance for a duck or quail shoot 
was too slim to invite the shooter afield, so the 
inanimate target was substituted. 



The reason that the Pacific Coast Handicap was 
not selected at the recent meeting of the Interstate 
Association was because the meeting was somewhat 
divided upon where the shoot should take place for 
1907. Strong inducements were held out in the in- 
terest of various Coast points. From recent informa- 
tion the Pacific Coast Handicap may take place in 
Spokane, Portland or possibly Seattle. It is the inten- 
tion of the Association to try to reach all of the differ- 
enl parts of the United States with their subsidiary 
shnols. 



It behooves our local trap shooting boomers to get 
a move Dii if they desire the Pacific Coast Handicap 
for Ingleside in September. One thing certain, and 
that is there will be a decidedly larger entry than at 
either of the prior handicaps. Further, San Fran- 
cisco can turn out a larger entry than will assemble 
at Portland or any of the northern points. By Sep- 
tember we will have plenty of hotels and other ac- 
commodations and can easily handle comfortably any 
crowd that may attend a big trap shoot — or for any 
lai ger feature for that matter. One thing that might 
induce a larger attendance than usual from the North 
is the sight seeing conditions. Thousands of people 
have journeyed across the continent for that purpose 
and have "got their money's worth." Arizona, New- 
Mexico and Texas will be as well, or better, represent- 
ed than at the Los Angeles and other shoots. 

It may look as if San Francisco wants too much in 
asking for the Coast Handicap again. This shoot 
would have been a big feature here last September, 
barring the fireworks. In consequence, there is a 
strong feeling among not only the local shooters, but 
with the fraternity in Vallejo, Sacramento, Santa 
Rosa, San Jose. Santa Cruz, Monterey and numerous 
Other points within easy reach of this city that the 
shoot take place at Ingleside, just to show what we 
intended to do and can do. 



Watson's Park, the famous Chicago trap shooting 
ground, will soon be a thing of the past. The ground 
is needed by the owning corporation for railroad pur- 
poses. The club-house and buildings will be sold at 
public auction and by February 1st the park will 
bo abandoned for trap shooting purposes bv the Chi- 
cago Trap Shooters' Association. 

This popular sporting resort was established by 
"Uncle" John Watson years ago. Hundreds of close- 
ly contested and shooting history making live-bird 
matches have taken place there between such famed 
crack shots as Fred Gilbert, T. P. Hicks, E. S. Rice, 
Silas Palmer, Dr. Carver. Captain Bouardus, J L, 
Brewer, Chas. Grim, C. W. Budd, John Winston, the 
Price boys, George, Abe and John Kleinman. Roll 
Organ. V (\ Patterson and a host of other shotgun 
devotees of the past three decades. 

A new shooting park is now in process of construc- 
tion at 123d street and Michigan Avenue, out on 
the West Side. 



Harvey McMurehv is due in 'Frisco about the end 
of February. "Prmee Mac" was always a great 
favorite here — and everywhere on the Coast. He 
will find just about all of uie bunch here, whilst 
lie may note the eradication of "Sportsmens' Row" 
and many other familiar old landmarks; he will find 
the Ingleside powder burning fests just about the 
same as usual. 



The local trap season will begin next month. Feb- 
ruary 22d will be one of the dates for a lively blue- 
rock shoot. 



We call attention to the brief but pointed half- 
page announcement of the Du Pont Powder Company 
on the inside of the front cover of this issue. This 
increase of space from one-eighth to a half -page is 
a testimonial that an advertisement in the only 
weekly paper published west of Chicago devoted to 
snort with shotgun and rifle is a paying investment. 
The Du Pont Powder Company have been patrons 
of the Breeder and Sportsman for twenty years past. 



Elmer E. Shaner. secretary-manager of the Inter- 
state Association, will be in Chicago early this month 
looking over the new shooting grounds and keeping 
in touch with the progress of events, as they relate to 
arransrr-ments for the holding of the Grand American 
Hand iea n for 1907. 

o 

The amateur championship event of the United 
Slates, held at the New York Athletic Club's grounds, 
December 12th, was the most successful shoot given 
in the Fast last year and emphasized the fact that 
money shoots are fast becoming a thing of the past 
in the Eastern Circuit, and that cups of the value 
given out at this shoot are an attraction that has 



come for keeps in this neck-of-the-woods, writes a 
correspondent of the St. Louis Sportsman. 

Target conditions were fine, with the exception of 
the temperature, and nothing better could have been 
picked out for the bugs. Manager Griefe and his 
committee are to be congratulated on the way the 
shoot and targets were turned out. 

Only one jarring note was present and that was 
the challenging of Griffiths, who shot for the Dead 
Shot people at the Grand American, by some of the 
shooters, but after investigation the shooting commit- 
tee found that Mr. Griffiths had been reinstated as 
an amateur. Some one also got the idea that Foord 
was too cool a shot for an amateur and entered a 
protest, but in this case the committee found that 
Foord never had shot as a professional, and from 
evidence given your humble servant later, is a 
simon pure amateur. 

At the end of the hundredth event Foord of the 
Wawasett Gun Club of Wilmington, Del., and F. W. 
Moffett, of the Crescent Gun Club, were tied for first 
place, with 94, and a moonlight shoot off found 
Foord a little steadier although Moffett was shoot- 
ing like a veteran. Foord only missed one target 
fired at, one being lost one a miss fire, and that one 
barely cleared the trap box, ending with 23 out of 
25, and Moffett only one bird behind with 22. 

Hendrickson, of the Queen's County Gun Club, who 
was champion last year, was shooting like a house 
afire until his last round when he dropped to 22 and 
finished up with 93. 

Martin of the Bergen Beach Club, did his breaking 
on his third event, dropping three, which tied he and 
Hendrickson, but by a little good luck in the right 
place and good shooting, made him the winner of 
the third cup. 

After the shoot off John S. Dickerson of the N. Y. 
A. C, donor of the champion cup, presented Mr. 
Foord the cup. 

The cup, made of solid silver and valued at $300, 
has a unique design and is worthy of the highest 
honors by trap shooters. The club and the donor 
are to be thanked for the boost that this event will 
give to the trap game, and especially the donor as 
he has promised to give a better one next year and 
told the representative of The Sportsman that he 
will give a cup as long as he lives, and as he is a 
fine sportsman the club is in for a fine cup that soon 
will be unequaled. 

As this is the home of the U. M. C, the shoot 
brought out a bunch, headed by Mr. Burrell, from 
this company. Among the most noted were "his 
honor." Tom Marshall. "Dad" Heikes, "Bill" Heer 
and Frank Butler, the mission face of R. D. Jones, 
Harry Overbaugh, F. W. Clark, and the salesman, 
J. G. Heath. 

Jim Elliott and Frank Lawrence held up the Win- 
chester end; Sim Glover, who won the professional 
cup, was on hand for the Ballistite and Saner gun; 
Kinskern and Gales for Walsrode and Saner gun; 
Jim Skelly and Lester' German for Du Pont; Haight 
and Nicol for L. and R., and "Smiling Jack" Fanning 
for L. and R. Du Pont; H. A. Wells "showed 'em" 
Dead Shot; Neaf Apgar and L. R. Keller Jr., ap- 
peared for the Peters Company; W. D. Hearn for 
Marlin Firearms Company, and last but not least, 
Harvey McMurchy for the Hunter Arms Company. 

"Gus" Griefe handled the office and White acted 
as official scorer. Scores: 





25 


25 


25 


25 


100 


W. M. Foord, Wawasset G. C... 


.24 


24 


22 


24- 


-94 


F. W. Moffett, Crescent A. C... 


.22 


25 


24 


23- 


-94 


J. H. Hendrickson, Queen's Co. 
















24 


23 


24- 


-93 


J. Martin, Bergen Beach 


23 


23 


23 


24- 


-93 


C. W. Billings, N. Y. A. C 


.20 


23 


20 


21- 


-Si 


J. S. Remsen, Carteret G. C 


23 


23 


21 


18- 


-85 


George Piercev, Hudson G. C... 


.22 


24 


25 


21- 


-92 


W. J. Lawlor, Sugar Hill G. C... 


.21 


19 


17 


15- 


-72 


J. C. Dudley, Wykagyl G. C 


19 


19 


23 


21- 


-82 


J. A. Henderson. Wykagyl G. C. 


.22 


22 


18 


18- 


-80 


F VV. Howard, Wykagyl G. C... 


.23 


22 


24 


21- 


-90 


W. J. Brennan, Wvkagyl G. C... 


.16 


17 


13 


18- 


-64 


Dr. J. Held, N. Y. A. C 


.21 


21 


19 


21- 


-82 


F. B. Stephenson, Crescent A. C. 


.21 


22 


21 


22- 


-86 


A. G. Southworth, Crescent A. C. 


.22 


21 


16 


20- 


-79 


O. C. Grinnel, Jr., Crescent A. C. 


.22 


21 


16 


20- 


-79 


George Kelley, Brooklyn G. C... 


.20 


24 


24 


23- 


-91 


T. J. Keller, Jr., professional . . . 


.22 


21 


21 


22- 


-86 


G. S. McCarthy, Florist G. C , , 


22 


23 


20 


24- 


-89 


H. Kirkwood, Boston G. C 


19 


23 


21 


25- 


-88 


Airs. W. J. Park, Florist G. C... 


.20 


22 


15 


22- 


-79 


G. B. Prest, New London G. C. 


.20 


15 


16 


21- 


-72 


R. Wolf, Narbeth G. C 


19 


18 


13 


21- 


-71 


E. Von Kattengell, M. P. G. C... 


.22 


19 


23 


24- 


-88 


A. L. Ivins, M. P. G. C 


.21 


23 


23 


17- 


-84 


Hans Hissing. North River G. C. 


.19 


22 


17 


24- 


-82 


Dr. Hunter, North River G. C... 


.21 


19 


21 


20- 


-81 


Dr. Richter, North River G. C... 


.21 


21 


18 


20- 


-80 


Fred Truax, North River G. C... 


.22 


23 


20 


23- 


-88 


Dr. Downs, North River G. C... 


.18 


16 


15 


22- 


-71 


R. S. Smith, Paleface G. C 


20 


23 


20 


25- 


-88 






21 


25 


22- 


-91 


P. H. Powell, Paleface G. C 


23 


16 


19 


22- 


-80 


.1. .MeAnlle. Paleface G. C 


17 


19 


20 


19- 


-75 


W. Hearne, professional 


23 


25 


20 


21- 


-89 




20 


16 


18 


22- 


-76 


R. S. Gales, professional 


20 


18 


16 


17- 


-71 



Sim Glover, professional 


.24 


25 


24 


23- 


-96 






23 


17 


23- 


-88 


G. B. Hubbell, Ossining G. C 


,16 


18 
17 


14 
16 


19- 


-67 


J. T. Hyland, Ossining G. C 


15 


10- 


-58 


W. Clark, Ossining G. C 


.13 


13 


10 


17- 


-53 


C. G. Blandford, Ossining G. C. 


.22 


14 


21 


19- 


-76 


E. C. Meyer, Andover G. C 


.19 


21 


22 


19- 


-81 


W. C. Darneron, Crescent A. C. 


.16 


12 


13 


10- 


-51 


A. E. Hendrickson, Crescent A.C. 


.19 


17 


13 


23- 


-72 


Roy Faye, Watertown G. C 


,19 


24 
20 


21 
16 


24- 


-88 


E. H. Lott, Crescent A. C 


. 16 


17- 


-69 


C. B. Whitehead, Morristown G.C 


.12 


10 


12 


10- 


-44 


L. German, professional 


.22 


25 


21 


23- 


-91 


R. Heikes, professional 


.22 


24 


22 


24- 


-92 


F. Butler, professional 


.22 


21 


20 


23- 


-S6 


W. Heer, professional 


.24 


24 


22 


23- 


-93 


A. Lindley, Smith G. C 


.19 


23 


20 


19- 


-SI 


J. Graceley, Old Mill G. C 


, 15 


16 


18 


17- 


-66 


H. S. Welles, professional 


.23 


24 


23 


24- 


-94 


J. B. Huntington, New Rochelle 
















21 


21 


25- 


-89 


A. Betti, Mount Kisco G. C 


. 25 


21 


21 


24- 


-91 


W. S. Haight, professional 


.18 


19 


13 


19- 


-69 




.23 


22 


19 


19- 


-83 


George Bechtel, I" ox Hill G. C... 


.21 


25 


22 


22- 


-90 


M. Woodruff. North River G. C. 


.23 


20 


17 


21- 


-81 


J. Phillips. Meadow Brook G. C. 


.18 


23 


21 


24- 


-86 


J. R. Elliott, professional 


.22 


22 


24 


24— 


-92 




.23 


18 


16 


22- 


-79 




.18 


22 


20 


21— 


-81 


.1. Fanning, professional 


24 


22 


19 


24— 


-89 




22 


23 


18 


23— 


-sc, 


T. Dukes. Montclair A. C 


21 


24 


19 


22— 


-86 


F. Winslow, Montclair A. C. .. . 


15 


19 


15 


19— 


-68 


P. H. Cockfair, Montclair A. C. 


21 


18 


22 


22— 


-83 


"67" N. Y. A. C 


14 


15 


20 


is- 


-67 


J. M. McKelvey, N. Y. A. C... 


22 


22 


23 


is— 


-85 


C. L. Bush. Montclair A. C 


23 


20 


22 


18— 


-83 


r. Hodgman, a. Y. A. C 


16 


24 


22 


17— 


-79 


E. H. Kniskern, professional.... 


18 


17 


17 


18— 


-70 


H. W. Dryer, Bergen Beach G. C 


16 


16 


12 


12— 


-56 


H. D. Bergen, Bergen Beach G. C 


18 


18 


20 


16— 


-72 


W. Ryder, Bergen Beach G. C . . . 


17 


22 


19 


14— 


-72 


L. A. Scortmeier, Bergen Beach 












G. C 


20 


21 


21 


24— 


-86 


H. Fleming, Bergen Beach G. C. 


22 


23 


21 


1 7— 


-83 


A. A. Fleischmann, Larchmont 












G. C 


15 


19 


20 


20— 


-74 


A. H. Chadbourne, N. Y. A. C... 


14 


20 


16 


16— 


-66 


J. S. Dickerson, N. Y. A. C 


17 


23 


20 


19— 


-79 


John H. Sanders, Schnectady G.C. 20 


22 


22 


24— 


-88 


George F. Pelham, N. R. A. C... 


20 


IS* 


16 


OA 


-88 


Dr. Wentz, Highland G. C 


23 


24 


22 


20- 


-89 


A. Ballantine, Highland G. C, , , , 


21 


21 


24 


24- 


-90 


J. F. Pratt, S. S. White G. C 


21 


20 


18 


16- 


-75 


F. Cantrell, S. S. White G. C. . . 


23 


23 


19 


22- 


-87 


F. Meyser, Bergen Beach G. C. 


10 


8 


15 


15- 


-48 


T. Y. Lydecker, Englewood 


12 


13 


15 


15- 


-55 


F. Villmar, N. Y. A. C 


16 


18 


23 


23- 


-80 



Systems of Choke Boring. 

The system of choke boring mostly used in the 
United States and England is that of the well known 
Greener system. In Belgium the taper choke boring 
is mostly used, and in Germany and Austria the 
conical form prevails. The conical form of choke 
boring is as follows: A taper is bored from the 
head of the shell chamber to half of the remaining 
length of the barrel, and from there another but 
slighter taper is bored to the muzzle of the barrel; 
in fact, the boring is a double taper, the lower being 
the stronger and the upper the lesser taper. In 
view of these different forms of choke boring the 
question very naturally arises, which is the best 
system? There is no doubt but what the Greener 
choke gives the best patterns with the finer sizes of 
shot, says a contemporary writer, but with the 
coarser sizes the patterns leave much to be desired. 
The taper choke as Pieper of Liege, Belgium, uses 
it, gives fair results with all sizes of shot, but the 
conical form of choke boring gives the best results 
generally with all sizes of shot, either coarse or 
fine, so far obtained. It also seems that this form 
of choke boring is best adapted to the 16-gauge. This 
form of choke boring is mostly used in the German 
Empire and Austria, and no doubt is the reason why 
the 16-guage retained its superiority and popularity 
there for a century or longer. The conical form of 
boring shotgun barrels is not of recent date, but 
was used nearly a century and a half ago. 

o 

Representative Humphrey called upon the Presi- 
dent recently to talk over things in general and 
to present to him the need of protection for game 
in Alaska. He wishes to have the present license 
fee materially increased and a limit set to the num- 
ber of each species of game which may be killed by 
one man. 

Governor Hoggatt of Alaska also favors several 
changes in the game law and will have a talk with 
the President about it in a few days. Mr. Hoggatt 
has already conferred with the Agricultural Depart- 
ment about the matter and believes that certain 
approved changes can be put through Congress at 
this session. 

o 

The Belvedere Gun Club has been reorganized and 
have secured Joyce Island for a shooting ground. A 
number of improvements have been made to that 
good hunting section of Suisun. Seabury Peterson 
was elected president and Dr. H. L. Lacoste secre- 
tary and treasurer. Rev. H. S. Rogers was appointed 
chairman of the advisory board. James Shields 
of Suisun has been engaged as head keeper. Among 
the members are such well known sportsmen as S. 
Peterson, Edgar Painter, Nat Boas, Dr. Posner, Dr. 
Simon, Dr. McGettigan, Dr. Lacoste, Donald Page, 
I. Wertheimer, M. Brower and J. A. Mallon. 



Saturday, January 5, 1907] 



11 



SOME HINTS ON TRAINING. 



To begin training your dog, I presume you have 
placed your choice on either a Pointer or Setter, to 
try to give you the merit of one breed over the other 
would more than likely bring on as much controversy 
as two different breeders of cattle would engage in if 
the different varieties were discussed. In the first 
place try to pick the dog of the breed that suits 
you best. If you favor- a Setter, by all means get 
him; if a Pointer, do the same. See that he has 
plenty of bone and lung power and good thick soles 
to his feet. Decide on nose by no other method than 
by giving the pup an opportunity to find game. 

We will begin by teaching the dog range, so at 
the same time his ambition for hunting will increase 
and his bird sense will be a natural sequence. If 
you care for a wide ranging dog, one that stays out, 
you must show some care in restraining him from 
having too much work at first, for if he should tire 
at first he will get into the habit of sticking to your 
heels too often, but as he gets strength encourage 
him, if he comes in, to go out again, by moving for- 
ward, and be sure and refrain from petting him 
when he comes in. A dog likes caresses and will 
often come in, leaving his work to secure another 
caress from his master. Kindness is a splendid 
thing to have in mind, but it can be abused in a man- 
ner opposite to the dog's interest, for in a young 
ster, the continual codling of him will detract his 
interest somewhat from his work. Another thing: 
The pup should never be called in from his work un- 
necessarily, and one thing extremely important to 
remember is to invariably keep the dog going from) 
you. Do not take abrupt turns and have him hunt 
the same ground over and over, but go forward and 



H. K. Hloodgood, New Marlboro, Mass. — Sporting 
Spaniels and Poodles. 

Thomas Cadwalader, Fort Washington, Pa. — Bea- 
les. 

W. Ormiston Roy, Montreal, Quebec. — Collies. 
J. W. Morgan, Montclair, N. J. — Old English Slfe< p 
dogs. 

Alfred M. Maclay, Westbury, L. I. — Dalmatians. 
Henry C. Beadleston, New York City — Bulldogs. 
Theodore Offerntan, New York City — Airedale Ter- 
riers. 

W. Freeland Kendrick, Philadelphia, Pa.— Bull 
Terriers. 

C. G. Hopton, East Orange, N. J. — Chow-Chows, 
French Bulldogs, Schipperkes, Chihuahuas, Italian 
Greyhounds, Papillons and miscellaneous. 

F. A. Teeling, Charlestown, Mass. — Boston Terriers. 

John Seargcant Price Jr., Chestnut Hill, Pa. — Irish 
Terriers. 

B. S. Smith, Closter, N. J— Welsh Terriers. 

T. S. Bellin, Minneapolis, Minn. — Scottish, Rose- 
neath, Skye. Berlington, Dandle Dlnmont, Black and 
Tan, Yorkshire, Maltese and Toy Spaniels. 

Mrs. Reginald F. Mayhew, Clifton, S. I. — Pomerani- 
ans, Pekinese Spaniels, Griffons Bruxellois and Pugs. 

Mrs. W. W. Hadley, New York City— English Toy 
Spaniels and Japanese Spaniels. 

For premium lists address James Mortimer. Super- 
intendent, 312 Townsend Building, 1123 Broadway, 
New York City. 



Entries for Boston close on January 30th. For 
premium lists, etc., Secretary J. N. Taylor, 244 Wash- 
ington street, Boston, announces he will furnish on 
ipplication by mail. 



m M A report of probable judges includes the name of 
started him. The idea is to keep the dog reachingfifflMr. Irving C. Ackerman of this city, who will pass 
out for likelv places, and the more opportunities vou"W>n th e Fox Terriers. Mr. Ackerman has taken a 
give him among birds, the result shows it will be no ttflm'ominent and active part in Fox Terrier circles 
time before he is setting a pace of his own and cares'wrfhere and is well capable of handling the classes at 
without encouragement to hustle out for good quail Jw Boston. James Mortimer, James Watson, Harry 
cover. So be sure in his youthful davs to keep him .ffii'' acv - - ,im Lvnn a,ld Major J- M. Taylor, all familiar 

11 not'ffl'" Coast fanciers, will also be in the ring. 



out in the open as much as possible, so he will not ™ 

lose sight of you and keep hunting for you instead^ We are pleased to note that there will be a full 



Random Collie Kennels at Santa Rosa announce 
in our advertising columns some young tri-colors 
for sale. 



of birds. If you are mounted on a horse he will deVfpassification for Irish Water Spaniels. This breed 
velop range faster, for then you will be more of a7/| has been neglected too long. Wm. T. Payne will 
conspicuous object to him than when you are afoot. 1 imi'i'lge all Spaniels. 

Possibly now he will have shown sufficient interest inM Boston Terriers will come under Mr. W. J. Green, 
birds to either point naturally, or to commence to$|The specials for this breed are many and valuable, 
chase as soon as he begins to draw on them. If heftj'S 

has adopted the latter course, encourage him in lt|*lj a Happy New Year token from Roland G. Gam- 
until the time arrives when he should be steadied ffiMwell of Bellingham, Wash., reminds us that Kulshan 
down, which should not be done until he himself, ,fyf< ocke i. Kennels have several promising youngsters 
begins to show some conception of the manner to|<M t h a t will make a strong bid for blue ribbons this year, 
handle them. This will be easily recognized byV ' 
the novice when the dog commences to draw on his 
birds high-headed and bangs right into them before 
he makes his customary flush. 

Some people have no use for a wide ranging dog 
and the type which is known as the New England 
shooting dog is the one that appeals to their fancy. 
He is ^iie dog that is used in countries where quail 
or grouse frequent heavy cover, either in the shape 
of rag weed or briar patches, or in timber, so that 
the owner wishes his dog at all times to work closely, 
to have him in view and have him under such con- 
trol as to work out just what part of the cover he 
desires. Naturally the speed of a dog, if he possesses 
it, is the first thing to sacrifice. This is done by 
frequently calling him to you and making him work 
over the same piece of ground several times. If he is 
naturally fast you will have some trouble at first to 
get him back, for speed in the woods is not by any 
means essential to his single bird work. So you 
will be obliged most of the. time to teach him to 
come in to you. This can be done in your own yard 
by attaching a 20-foot cord to his collar, encourag- 
ing him to go frorfl you, and the moment he gets 
to the end of the cord draw him back to you quickly, 
using the word of command to come in, or any word 
that suits you. Constant repitition of this will bring 
him under control, until you can take him afield with 
the cord still attached. 



Enos Valencia recently sold a three-year-old 
Pointer, Oakland Lad (Ned Thurston-Diana) . to Mr. 
Lawson of the Country Club. Lad's work to the gun 
has been very pleasing to his new master. 



Mr. R. H. Groves, a Stockton fancier, enthusiasti- 
cally identified with the career of the Stockton Ken- 
nel Club and who favors the Irish Setter .breed, lias 
sent East for a good bitch. 



Mr. W. H. McKay, another prominent and active 
Flour City lover of dogs, is pleased very much with 
a recent Cocker Spaniel litter out of his good bitch, 
Lady Mye. The fine stud dog. D. P. Cresswell's Ch. 
Mepals Saxon is the sire. The five puppies were 
whelped December 12th, two are dogs and all get- 
ting on nicely. 

A litter seven weeks old by Saxon, out of Juanita 
III., are also coming along finely. The puppies are 
all large, husky youngsters and show much promise 
for a more than satisfactory bench career. Mr. C. 
Leonard, a fancier identified with Cockers for over a 
decade, is interested with Mr. McKay in this litter. 



A Wholesale Bear Killing. 

David Boyle, general manager of the Red Cross 
Mining Company, near Gold Bar, Washington, who is 
one of the most ardent and successful hunters in the 
State, brought back to his home with him after a 
thirteen-day hunt, just before the season closed, the 
skins of seven black bears. Mr. Boyle had with him 
on the hunt Walter L. Reader of New York. The 
territory covered by the hunters is near Lake Isbel, 
in Snohomish county, where Mr. Boyle is a large 
property holder. 

"No chase could have had a more fitting close 
than that of Mr. Reader and myself." declared Mr. 
Boyle, in speaking of the hunt. "We had been out 
twelve days, during each of which we had brought 
down one and sometimes two of the beasts. We were 
bringing the hunt to a close and making our way 
back toward the Red Cross mines, when the biggest 
and fiercest fellow of the whole lot was met. 

"He was sniffing the air on a 1,500-foot precipice 
that stood out sheer above Lake Isbel. When we 
got as near as 300 feet to him I let him have it in 
the neck with my Winchester. Before he recovered 
from the first shock Reader had peppered him. He 
was thoroughly aroused now and instead of running 
away from us, as is the nature of most black bears, 
he made right for us. It was then a question of 
shoot quick or take to flight; so we both turned into 
him for three more shots apiece. He was within 
twenty feet of us when the last bullet tore through 
his brains. Eight shots in all had been sent into 
his black hide. He weighed 600 pounds and was 
6 feet 8 inches from tip to tip. I had my daughter 
come out afterwards and take a picture of the scene. 

"When a man tells you a black bear won't scrap, 
you tell him he does not know what he is talking 
about. Get him cornered and he'll fight worse than 
a wildcat. 

"And don't forget this part of the story: We were 
out thirteen days, killed seventeen bear, and didn't 
have a dog with us. No; I don't believe in hunting 
deer or bear with dogs; can't see any sport in it. 
It's just like two big men double teaming a little 
one. Give the brutes a chance by matching your 
instinct against theirs." 

o 

Fish Eggs for New Zealand. 

Commissioner and Chief Inspector of Fisheries 
for New Zealand Hon. L. F. Ayson recently arrived 
in San Francisco bent on a mission for the stocking 
of the New Zealand rivers with fish of various kinds. 
By arrangement between this and the New Zealand 
Government similar shipments have been made under 
Ayson's direction annually since 1900. Success has 
attended the transplanting, and last year a small run 
of Chinook salmon returned from sea to the New 
Zealand riyer, in which they were spawned. Ayson 
expects to take back with him this year 500,000 eggs 
of the Chinook salmon, 2,000,000 of whitefish from 
the Great Lakes, 1,000,000 lake herring and 50,000 
landlocked salmon. If he can arrange it with the 
State authorities he also wants to take back a num- 
ber of live small striped bass. 



Scientific Shooting. 

Many squads and participants in the recent Na- 
tional Rifle Shoot at Seagirt failed to get prizes and 
consequently have been prolific in explanation, but 
not one of these shooters have stated the case as 
clearly as has Major Robert Lynn Roberts of Clarks- 
burg, West Virginia, the member of the crack rifle 
team sent from that State to Seagirt. He says: 

"We went to Seagirt with our rifles and a few 
boxes of matches with which to take the shine from 
the tip of the sight. Then we stretched out on our 
stomachs in good old fashioned mountain fashion 
and banged away at the targets. Some of our squad 
have valises full of medals for shootin,' but we 
didn't need any new valises at Seagirt. 

"While we were firing away, feeling for the wind 
by instinct, the New York squad came up to the 
line and began unloading its paraphernalia. It seemed 
like each marksman had a wagonload of gimcracks. 
First he would put up a tripood, on which he would 
stick a long pole. On top of that he set cups, into 
which blew the breeze. This was some sort of wind 
guage. Then they unloaded thermometers and tele- 
scopes. They did everything but send a man to the 
target with a gimlet to bore a hole in the bullseye 
and then send a bullet by a special messenger to be 
plugged into the hole. 

"That was too much for West Virginia. Down our 
way there is hardly a man that can't bore a hole 
in a silver dollar at 300 yards or pick feathers from 
a buzzard at 500 or more, but on the beach at Seagirt 
we didn t seem to measure up with the thermometer- 
barometer soldiers. 

"What puzzles me is what good that kind of 
shootin' is goin' to do in war time. By the time a 
man has his wind guage up he's likely to be ready 
for the Red Cross." 



The Irish Terrier Club of America offer a number 
of fine specials for the Boston show. Besides the 
Homebred Puppy Stake, the Vixen Stake and the 
Champion Historian Cup, cash specials, $6, $4 and $2 
are offered for best, second and third best American 
or Canadian bred, in regular puppy novice, limit and 
open classes for both dogs and bitches, also $10 
prizes for best American or Canadian dogs (over 
twelve months, between 23 and 25 pounds), and best 
bitch (over twelve months, weighing not less than 
21 or over 23 pounds). 

For further particulars address Hon. Secretary O. 
W. Donner, 117 Wall street, New York. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



Mr. George B. MacLean's bitch, recently purchased 
of Mr. Murrell, is in whelp to Prince of Orange, a 
new heavyweight Bulldog in the London Kennels. 



Bulldogs are gaining favor daily down south. We 
should not be surprised to see Mr. Vandergrift take 
an increased interest in the breed again. At several 
Southern California shows recently he has been a 
winning exhibitor. 



The Westminster Kennel Club show will take place 
in New York City, at Madison Square Garden, Feb- 
ruary 12, 13, 14 and 15. The judges selected are 
the following: 

Roger D. Williams, Lexington, Ky. — Bloodhounds, 
Deerhounds, Greyhounds, Foxhounds, Samoyedes and 
Whippets. 

James J. Lynn, Port Huron, Mich. — Mastiffs, and 
Fox Terriers. 

Dudley E. Waters, Grand Rapids, Mich.— St. Ber- 
nards. 

B. Ulrich, Nurnberg, Germany — Great Danes and 
Dachshunds. 

Dr. J. E. De Mund, Bensonhurst, N. Y. — Russian 
Woldhounds and Newfoundlands. 

William Arkwright, Sutton Scarsdale, England. — 
Pointers, Retrievers and Basset Hounds. 

Major J. M. Taylor, Rutherford, N. J.— Setters, Re- 
trievers and Chesapeake Bay dogs. 



Champion Buckwa, an English Setter well liked 
by local fanciers here two or three years ago. is In 
stud at the Gabilan Kennels. Hollister. Puck is a 
dog of quality, a fine worker to the gun. has the 
conformation that indicates vitality and stamina and 
bred to the proper bitches should prove a very satis 
factory sire. At. present he is practically an unknown 
quantity as a producing sire, having only been used 
but once. Bad luck and handicapping circumstances 
put the litter by him out of the going for record or 
observation. 



Mrs. Murphy will devote her liking for good dous 
henceforth to English Setters. She has several fine 
brood bitches at present, ones bred on recognized and 
sought for blood lines. She knows a Setter thoroughly 
and will, we believe, accomplish a great deal for the 
breed here. It will be remembered that several 
seasons ago she had a good one, Fairland Dude, in 
stud at her kennels. Dude's get has given satisfac- 
tion. His progeny East have been up with the lead 
ers. 



Norman J. Stewart can not be weaned from dog 
dom and its varied interests. For a time he was a 
bit quiescent, but the spirit would not stay dormant. 
He had his dogs located here and there temporarily, 
and sold a few, but now he states that he contem- 
plates having a place again in San Jose, where he 
can keep a few dogs. Catch him without a good one 
or two at any time if you can. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 5, 1907 



DUCK SHOOTING NOTES. 

For about two weeks now local sportsmen who 
ha vi' journeyed to the various club preserves in the 
bay counties marshes have had but poor returns in 
the line of duck shooting sport. The recent stormy 
weather and rains have scattered the birds far and 
wide. What birds are left are a few stragglers, that 
is, of most varieties, save the deep-water ducks, 
principally the canvasbacks and bluebills. These 
two varieties are now in the open bays in flocks of 
thousands. 

One section where the birds are plentiful yet is in 
the overflowed sections of the Sacramento and Yolo 
basins, and further un the Sacramento valley, about 
Colusa, Willows, Gridley, etc., where the fresh-water 
marsh districts afford the birds plenty of the kinds 
of feed they like at this time of the year. Up to a 
week ago ducks were very plentiful about Eos llanos. 
They were also reported to be present in immense 
numbers on the thirty miles extent of overflow in 
and about Tulare Lake. 

Another resort the ducks have sought is away 
to the south, the Imperial valley and Salton Sink 
country, for it does not take these swift-winged birds 
a great length of time nor overtiring exertion to fly 
away a lew hundred miles when weather and feed 
conditions prompt a change of base. 

Duck hunters returning from the Imperial valley 
and Salion Sink country advance a plausible argu- 
ment to account for the present scarcity of web-footed 
sporting material in many favorite resorts of hunters 
between he'e and the southern parts of this State, 
and are inclined to the belief that the greater body 
of migrating waterfowl is wintering around the 
lower Colorado rather than In the vast overflows of 
the Sacramento and San Joaquin. 

Sportsmen familiar with current conditions in 
these localities may be a bit disinclined to admit 
the latter part of the statement, but dozens and 
dozens of limit sacks of ducks sent recently from 
Hrawley to Los Angeles commission dealers prove 
conclusively the presence of ducks within striking 
distance from Brawley. In fact, wild ducks are ap- 
parently so plentiful down south that the Los Angeles 
fruit dealers are handling wild ducks, bringing their 
birds from the same section — a state of affairs that 
suggests some sort of "underground railroad" to 
evade the 50-bird bag limit. 

An unparalleled grain crop was raised last year 
in the territory tributary to the Colorado river, so 
vast, in fact, that many fields were left uncut, if 
the reports of returning gunners are to be credited, 
fall plowing is now due and done on many ranches, 
and the situation, from a duck viewpoint, is there- 
fore' ideal in the Imperial country just now. 

Depending very little upon rain, the ranchers about 
Hrawley. when ready to break up their ground in 
the fall, turn an immense head of perhaps a thou- 
sand inches of water into their fields, and Hood forty 
or more acres, sometimes in a single night, engulfing 
millions of insects, covering up quantitiles of grain, 
atid. in short, producing exactly the sort of ponds 
that a sprig might naturally consider made especially 
for his comfort and convenience. 

At night the ducks resort to these overflows and 
grain fields in millions, and the ranchers state the 
noise of the birds quacking and squawking is so 
great that often they cannot sleep for the racket. 
Shooting is only powder burned so far as chasing 
the hungry fowl away is concerned. Sometimes they 
will clean up a field in a single night, so it is 
claimed by the ranchers. 

The overflows change constantly; the water is al- 
lowed to sink into the earth and soften it, so the 
water bodies vary in location, making it difficult for 
a duck hunter to keep posted on the particular sec- 
tion being used by the birds at any given time. Last 
week they were not where they flocked in thousands 
a few days before, and a day later they may be a 
hundred miles away. 

During the daylight hours immense flocks of sprig, 
mallard, widgeon and other ducks resort to the 
broad expanse of that vast inland ocean, the Santon 
Sea, and rest there undisturbed, there being no 
way to get at them. This trick is also a well known 
exasperating practice of the birds on the open 
waters of the bay and up-river overflows. When 
night comes the quackers strike out for the over- 
flowed fields again. Practically all of the big bags 
down south have been acquired by methods such as 
no true sportsman would find very enjoyable — pot- 
shooting at night — a practice that is much in vogue 
just now in Oakland creek and also the Tiburon 
lagoon, "Browning" flecks as they whizz by overhead, 
and the like is the game resorted to by some gunners. 



Reports from Portland state that the duck shoot- 
ing in that section is practically over. What few 
birds are still in the country are hardly worth hunt- 
ing. The season this year has been a very unsatis- 
factory cne. 



While the club sportsmen have had poor results 
le.-ently. the independent inner who finds Bport on 
the east bay shores and the waters of Richardson's 
bay has had an enjoyable inning. Fat canvasback 
and good conditioned bluebills can be seen daily on 
the water in flocks of thousands and thousands. These 
birds are hunted by gunners in boats in hundreds 
of brush blinds and by a keen eyed skirmish line of 
shooters stationed along the shore. These three 
disturbing elements keep the birds moving and en- 
ables the hunters to get many birds. The best results 
have been obtained early in the morning, when the 
birds are in flight to different feeding spots. 



Several years ago the writer, in an article on 
blinds, outlined a plan whereby the open and shal- 
low waters of the bay. particularly east San Fran- 
cisco bay and San Pablo bay flats, could be utilized 
by hunters with the result that in a surprising short 
time the east bay shores, for one place, was dotted 
for miles with platforms on which brush was ar- 
ranged. That this suggestion turned out profitably 
to the shooters cannot be disputed. 

For bay shore and open water shooting the writer 
suggests another plan of campaign, a successful style 
of duck shooting in practice on the New England 
coast, in "Surf Duck Shooting." a story that was pub- 
lished in the Christmas issue of the Breeder and 
Sportsman. The plan is a simple one, if there is 
a unity of action on the part of the gunners. The 
birds fly along certain routes morning and evening. 
This fly-way being known, the hunters start out in 
the early morning, the first boat on the shooting 
ground anchors where he pleases and the decoys are 
then set out. The next party arriving anchors two 
gunshots away, the line of battle is then established 
and the later comers row out and drop anchor al- 
ways two gunshots away from each other. There is 
sometimes a line of a mile or more of skiffs on the 
shooting ground by the time the sun is well tip. and 
the gun barrels may be seen sticking out their 
tongues of fire all along the line at the same time. 
This system certainly will control the situation when 
the birds are flying up or down the bay — unless they 
become wise to the game and fly high. 



Quail Hunting Notes. 

Quail hunting conditions should be most excellent 
now after the recent rains. The members of the 
Napa Valley Gun (Hub, who shoot on a preserve near 
Napa, have had splendid quail shooting since the 
season opened. Ed. Wands, Fred Baltzer, Jack Fil- 
mer, F. Hunsm'an and W. Warner left for the club 
grounds last Saturday to enjoy a two or three days' 
shoot. Enos Valencia, one of the best quail shots 
in the State, and a very clever dog trainer, is the 
club-keeper. 

Valencia is responsible for the story that last year, 
shortly after the open season on birds closed, he 
found it necessary to obtain a permit from the Fish 
Commission to train and work young dogs on birds. 
He claims that Chief Deputy Charles H. Vogelsang 
stated that in the strict construction of the language 
of the statute it is illegal to work dogs on quail, and 
that a dog trainer or sportsman handling and work- 
ing his own dog on birds in close season is amenable 
to arrest. 

The language of the statute is as follows: 

"Section 626. — Every person who. between the 15th 
day of February and the 15th day of October of any 
year, pursues, takes, kills or destroys, or has in his 
possession, whether taken or killed in the State of 
California, or shipped into the State from any other 
State, Territory or foreign country, and valley quail, 
or partridge, or any kind of wild duck, or any rail, 
or any curlew, ibis plover, or other shore birds, etc., 
is guilty of a misdemeanor." 

Valencia again applied last September for a per- 
mit to work his dogs and was refused, so he states, 
by the Chief Deputy for the reasons given above. 

This interpretation of the statute is far fetched 
and farcical and will work a hardship to sportsmen 
who own and want dogs trained for the field. It 
practically amounted to an imposition upon a trainer, 
who was honest enough to seek what he thought 
proper advice from a State official — a proceeding 
that was entirely unnecessary. It is not within the 
spirit, nor was it the intent of the lawmakers when 
the statute was framed. In fact, it is of such pre- 
posterously ridiculous import that if there is the 
faintest indication on the part of any official in this 
State to try and enforce such Sbsurd and extreme" 
observatism of the game law the sportsmen of the 
State will arise en masse and something will drop. 

Elk Poachers Held for Trial. 

We are pleased to state that William Binkley and 
Charles Purdy. charged with unlawfully killing elk 
in the Yellowstone National Park and shipping parts 
of them to Los Angeles were, on December 21st. held 
for the action of the United States District Court for 
the Southern District of Wyoming. 

In giving the decision United States Commissioner 
William Van Dyke of Los Angeles, where the de- 
fendants were arrested, placed the bail of the two 
men at $2,500 for each man over the amount asked 
at the time of their arrest. The case has attracted 
wiili- interest, mil only in Los Angeles, but in Winn- 
ing and Idaho, where the men came from. The 
freight car laden with elk scalps, horns and teeth, 
which was seized by Game Warden Morgl n, made 
one of the largest seizures of elk trophies ever made 
in the United States. It is stated that the value of 
the trophies would total the sum of $10,000. 

The men, Binkley and Purdy, are said to have been 
in the poaching business for years and this final 
Shipment was intended as a clean-up, after which the 
two men intended to go to Mexico and spend the 
rest of their days. 

The defense endeavored to establish the fact that 
as all of the trophies were tagged by the Justice 
of the Peace of the district there was a right to 
ship them. 

o 

Southern California Anglers Meet. 

A communication from Colonel E. L. Hedderly of 
Los Angeles states that members of the Southern 
California Rod and Reel Club discussed needed legis- 
lation to protect the ocean game fish at a meet- 



ing held two weeks ago, and took steps to arrange for 
a sort of general celebration to be held some time 
this month, at which the entire membership is to 
be brought out, if possible, and a general jolification 
arranged for some time next month. 

The meeting was well attended and the best of 
sentiment was shown, but nothing very definite was 
accomplished along legal lines. The matter of the 
selection of a Fish Commissioner to represent South- 
ern California was talked over, and the names of 
several who have been suggested were considered, 
but pending a conference with some of the prospec- 
tive appointees none were indorsed. It is hoped 
some one can be secured who has knowledge of 
the needs of Southern California fishermen, as well 
as the gun sportsmen. It is desired at the same 
time to work the commercial interests no injury 
that can possibly be avoided. It is felt that in 
order to represent this end of the State properly any 
appointee must be not only unusually well posted on 
these subjects, but be a level-headed, energetic and 
forceful man as well. Every bit of legislation ad- 
vanced with a view to helping the sportsmen's cause 
is likely to be met with a howl of damaged in- 
dustry by the market interests, and the Commissioner 
must be well enough versed in the facts to differen- 
tiate between these claims and the real facts of the 
case. Whoever is indorsed by the Southern Califor- 
nia Rod and Reel Club will be as nearly as possible 
a man who can fill the bill. 

Henry W. Keller, who is probably the best posted 
man in Southern California along the lines men- 
tioned, having held the office with credit in the 
past, has, it is said, refused unconditionally to serve. 
He has offered to assist whoever is appointed with 
his experience in the matters at hand. 

A Fish Commissioner has the expenses of attend- 
ing meetings paid, but draws no salary, the office 
being honorary. He gives perhaps a week's time 
each month to attending meetings in San Francisco, 
which no one but a man who has practically retired 
from active business can afford to do. 

The members of the club say that the sport at 
present was very inferior all along the Coast. 

The forthcoming light tackle tournament is being 
arranged for. and some plans will be formulated at 
the next meeting, which will take place very early 
in the future. 

The club has decided upon buttons emblematic 
of fishing, and these will be issued soon. 

o 

TRADE NOTES. 

In Line With a Good One. 

The E. I. I)u Pont Company of Wilmington. Del., 
has for the year 1907 issued a very handsome calen- 
dar, the illustration on which is by that celebrated 
artist, Edmund H. Osthaus, and entitled, "The Return 
of the Hunters." The party evidently met with suc- 
cess, as several ruffled grouse and a woodcook are 
shown in the bag. As they come in they are met by 
the puppies of the old Setter, who has been out all 
day, and the joy and interest displayed by the young- 
sters shows the quality of the blood that courses 
through their veins. Copies of this calendar may 
be had by sending 10 cents to the home office, or to 
any of the branch offices of the company, the dime 
being only sufficient to cover the cost of mailing and 
postage. The calendar needs to be seen to be fully 
appreciated. 



Always Ready. 

The prosperous condition of the G. W. Cole Com- 
pany, who are the original and sole manufacturers 
of Three-ln-One Oil, is not at all surprising, as the 
volume of their business has been increasing wonder- 
fully the past year. In fact, it has severely taxed 
the capacity of their factory at different times. But 
Mr. Slee, president of the company, has always in- 
sisted on being in a position to make prompt and 
immediate shipments to jobbers, no matter where 
they are located and how large their order for this 
famous oil may be. 



The Winchester Expert Squad. 

The Winchester Squad ,of expert shots, which has 
now finished its memorable tour, figured in another 
world's record at Chattanooga, Tenn., December 4th. 
At this place the representatives of the powder com- 
panies, Messrs. Huff, Hatcher, Borden and Ward, 
were augmented by the popular Winchester repre- 
sentative, Harold Money, and undertook to beat the 
regular Winchester Squad. They nearly succeeded 
in doing so, as they made a total score of 485 out 
of 500, against 48G for the Winchester Squad. The 
total for the ten shooters of 971 out of 1.000, which 
established a new world's record for that number 
of shooters, beating the previous one made at Dur- 
ham earlier in the tour. All used Winchester factory 
loaded shells. 



Send Fcr One. 

A beautiful art catalogue, giving special prices on 
seventeen different grades of guns, ranging in price 
from $17.75 to $300, will be sent upon request to 
any address, by the Ithaca Gun Company, Lock 
Box No. 19, Ithaca, New York. The manufacturers 
are so sure that their guns will stand comparison 
with other makes that they make the following 
i...eral proposition: "If you don't know what gun to 
buy, order an Ithaca and a gun of any other make. 
Compare them, and if the Ithaca is not the best by 
an odds, return it. N. B.— The Ithaca stays." 



Saturday, January 5, 1907] 



THE BREEDER 



A N 1) S PORTSMAN 



13 



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Everything in Hardware 

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HINTS ABOUT RAISING HOGS. 



Give the late fall pigs a chance. 
Keep them warm and feed them well. 
They will turn you money if you give 
them care; neglect them and you'll 
lose money. 

Throw some of the sweet apples 
that you don't know what to do with 
to the hogs. They relish them and 
they make good pork, too. 

Clean pens and clean pork go to- 
gether. 

There is a better market for medium 
sized hogs than for those that are 
overgrown. 

Hogs will eat nice, well-cured sweet- 
corn stalks and thrive on them nicely. 
Try this after you take them in from 
pasture. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAllT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
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As a HUMAN REMEDY for Rheu- 
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is invaluable. 

Every bottlo of <?auntic Balsam sold is 
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press, charges paid, with full directions for its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Oiiin 



CONCORD EACE TRACK 

Concord, Contra Costa County, Cal. 

Having leased the above track we 
have made arrangements to break and 
develop trotters and pacers. We have 86 
box stalls and will guarantee to keep 
this track in perfect order. The climate 
is unsurpassed. Owners and trainers are 
cordially invited to visit this course. 
As a winter track Concord is second to 
no other in California. Terms very rea- 
sonable. F. M. HAMMETT and J. E. 
FOSTER, Lessees. 



RIVERSIDE TRACK FOR SALE. 

The half-mile race track at Riverside 
(the best footing of any track in the 
State), lots of good, pure artesian 
water, fine grandstand, 45 good stalls, 
big hay barn, everything in the best of 
condition. Excellent pasturage in cen- 
ter field. Climate absolutely the best 
for winter and summer quarters in Cali- 
fornia. All horsemen agree that it is 
the best training track in the State, as 
no horse ever went lame on the River- 
side track. It is centrally located, about 
10 minutes' drive from the business cen- 
ter of the town. An ideal place for any 
trainer with some capital, as Riverside 
is one of the best cities in Soul hern Cal- 
ifornia, for horse racing. This is always 
proven by the large attendance at every 
meeting given in this prosperous place. 
For price and particulars address EU- 
GENE F. BINDER, Owner, 127 Vine St., 
Riverside, Cal. 



VETERINARY DENTISTRY 

Ira Barker Dalziel, formerly of 605 Golden 
Gate Ave., is now permanently located at 

620 Octavia St., San Francisco 

Between Fulton and Grove Sts. 
Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. 

Complicated cases treated successfully. 
Calls from out of town promptly respon- 
ded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
620 Octavia St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Special 2074 

BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 

Dealers in PAPER. 

No. 403 Twelfth St., Oakland 
Rlake, Mottit & Townp. Los Angeles 
Blake. MeFall & Co.. Portland. Oregon. 



Fred Mast Successor to Zibbell 85 Son 

THE AVENUE STABLE. 
672-680 11th Ave., one block north of 
Chutes. 

A nice line of New Livery; Large, 
Clean Box Stalls. Special attention paid 
to boarding high-class horses. Work 
horses for any business for hire at all 
times. All kinds of country horses for 
sale. 



J. R. Wilson. 

WILSON 



A. F. Booker 

ROOKER 



Livery, Board and Feed Stable 

All kinds of team work on short no- 
tice. Contractors for Grading and Ex- 
cavating. 410 Franklin St., eor. Grove. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



IMPORTED HACKNEY STALLIONS 

At one-half other people's prices. Jf 
you want bargains write at once to 

R. P. STERICKER, West Orange, N. J. 



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Pointers and 

English Setters 

Trained and Broken 

Kroken Dogs and Well Bred Puppies 
for sale. Address E. VALENCIA 

212 North Brown St., Napa, Cal. 

ENGLISH SETTERS 
Trained and Broken 

Well Bred Broken Dogs for 
Sale 

Address Wm. PHILLIPS 

Benicia 

BULL TERRIERS. — Pure white, high 
class puppies for sale. Woodlawn Baron, 

a classy individual and show winner, 
brother to the winner of first and spe- 
cials ai Bull Terrier Breeders' Show at 
Philadelphia (at which the best in the 
world were shown) at stud. Fee $15. 
STILETTO KENNELS, 2447 Russell 
Street, Berkeley, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 
TRICOLOR COLLIE PUPS from 

working stock. Sire Shadeland Random, 
Sir Jan. A. K. c. 100,896 (son of Imp. 
Inverness Prince). RANDOM COLLIE 
KENNELS, E. C. Rrand, Prop., Box 116, 
Santa Rosa, Cal. 

MARE WANTED. 

By McKinney, Zombro, Kinney Dou, 
Greco. Searchlight or Nutwood Wilkes, 
not to exceed seven years old, brown, 
bay or black; sound, good size and 
handsome; trotter with or without rec- 
ord; standard and registered. Answer 
giving full particulars and lowest cash 
price. 

P. W. KELLEY, 
Breeder and Sportsman, 616 Golden 
Gate Ave., San Prancisco, Cal. 

KINNEY LOU COLT FOR SALE. 

Foaled 1905. Dam by Hoodie 2:12%, 
2nd dam by Antevolo 7648, 3rd dam by 
Altamont 3600. For price and further par- 
ticulars call on 

Q. B. Blanchard, San Jose, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

ALIX B., hay mare (record 2:24%) by 
Nutwood Wilkes (2:16%) and out of 
Alberta (by Albert W. 2:20). 

CARLTON W. GREENE, 
873 Eddy Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION FOR 
SALE. 

I have six thoroughbred stallions for 
sale at prices to suit purchasers of 
limited means. No breeder of harness 
horses can afford to go without a thor- 
oughbred horse on his farm for a brood- 
mare sire for getting fine mares for 
dams of high class roadsters. Address 
CAPT. T. B. MERRY, 

549 Grand Ave, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

The well known stallion Milbrne 
2:lG'/4 and his two brothers. Portola 
and Menlo Boy. Milbrae is a handsome 
seal brown, 16 hands high and weighs 
1,190 lbs., a horse of excellent disposi- 
tion, splendid conformation and pos- 
sessed of great power and beauty. Mil- 
brae is sired by Prince Airlie, he by 
Guy Wilkes 2:15 V4, great grand sire 
Geo. Wiles 2:22. first dam Fearless by 
Fallis 2:23, second dam Jean Perault 
by Signal. For further information ap- 
ply to P. H. McEvoy, Menlo Park, Cal. 



BUZZ SAW <3455 FOR SALE. 

BUZZ SAW 43455 is a handsome, Jet 
black colt, foaled April 10th, 1904. Solid 
color, 15 hands, and weighed 950 pounds 
December 10th, as a two-year-old. lie; 
is perfectly sound, and while just broken 
to drive is a remarkably pure-gaited trot- 
ter, with a snappy quick action and fine 
style. Buzz Saw is by Strathway 13214. 
first dam Idleweiss by Gen. Dogan 17604; 
second dam Hazel by Capoul 10.17; third 
dam by Romulus; fourth dam by Simp- 
son's Black Bird. He Is entered in the 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes ($7000) 
and the Occident Stake. A great pros- 
pect for anyone wanting a good colt. 
Would not sell him, but am going out 
of the horse business. For further par- 
ticulars address 

R. G. WHITE, Hanford, Cal. 

FOR SALE! 

Mare by Direct 2:05>/z, in foal to 
Zolock 2:0514. 
Address 
HENRY DELANEY, 
University P. O., 
Los Angeles, California 

FOR SALE. 

A matched driving team of sorrels 
with white points, six years old, both 
fillies; well broken, gentle and stylish, 
and can road along close to three min- 
utes. Fur pedlgrer! and further par- 
ticulars w ill).' D. A. MADEIRA, Salinas, 
California. 



Dividend Notice. 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
161 Montgomery St., Cor. Sntter. 

Has declared a dividend for the term 
ending December 31, 1906, at the rate 
of three and one-half (3%) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
ami payable on and a Tier January _', 
added to and bear the same rate of in- 
terest as principal. 

EDWIN IIOXXKI.I.. Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St. 

For the half year ending December 
31, 1906, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) 
per cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Wed- 
nesday, January 2, 1907. Dividends not 
called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of interest as the principal 
from Januaiy 1, 1907. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



San Francisco Savings Union 

N. W. Cor. California and Mont- 
gomery Streets 

For the half year ending December 
31, 1906, a dividend has been declared 
at the rates per annum of three and 
eight-tenths (3 8-10) per cent on term 
deposits and three and forty-two one- 
hundredths (3 42-100) per cent on or- 
dinary deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after Wednesday, January 2, 
1907. Depositors are entitled to draw 
their dividends at any time during the 
succeeding half year. Dividends not 
drawn will be added to the deposit ac- 
count, become a part thereof and earn 
dividends from January 1st. 

LOVELL, WHITE, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

Cor. California and Montgomery 
Streets 

For the six months ending December 
31, 1906, dividends have been declared 
on the deposits in the savings depart- 
ment of this company as follows: On 
term deposits at the rate of three and 
six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per annum, 
and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 
three and one-half (3%) per cent per 
annum, free of taxes, and payable on 
and after Wednesday, January 2, 1907. 
The same rate of interest will be paid 
by our branch offices, located at 1531 
Devisadero St., 927 Valencia St. and 
1740 Fillmore St. 

J. DALZIEL, BROWN, Mgr. 



RACING! 



New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Racetrack 



Six or more races each week day, rain 
or shine. 



Opening Saturday, November 17. 

Races commence at 1:40 P. M., sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12 o'clock, thereafter 
every twenty minutes until 1:40 P. M. 
No smoking In last two cars, which are 
reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after 
fifth and last races. 



THOS. H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 

SOME GOOD ONES FOR SALE. 

KA.MONA S„ bright bay filly, four 
years Old, 15% hands. weighs about 
1050 pounds. By Zombro, dam Ami lie 
by Antevolo; second dam by Major 
Turtlelock. Sound, handsome, gentle, 
anil h;is trotted miles In 2:17 l /£. A. good 
racing prospect; goes without boots; 
stylish roadster, 

S1RKKY ItOItSK. sorrel, five years 
old. 16.1 hands, weighs 1200 pounds, 
good high-headed, stylish surrey horse 
Sound, gentle and pleasant driver; 

afriad of nothing. 

A NIT A, brown mare, six years old, 

1 r» . 1 bands, weighs about 1060 pounds 

By Terrle by Guy Wilkes, dam by Ante- 
volo. This mare Is In foal to Prince 

Ansel and nominated in the Breeders' 
Futurity stake, $7000 guaranteed, She 
Is sound and gentle and anyone can 
drive her. 

The above slock will be sold reason- 
able. For further particulars address 

E. A. SWABY, Dixon, Cr.l. 



14 



THE B REEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 5, 1907 



A Guide to Horse Boot 
Buying— Free 



The latest and greatest improve- 
ments in norse Boots — the re- 
sult of two years' planning, as- 
sisted by the advice and ideas 
of the master reinsmen of the 
country — will be found in our 
new catalogue. It shows more 
new patterns and improvements 
than any catalogue ever pub- 
lished. We are making the only 
absolutely new and up-to-date 
line of horse boots on the mar- 
ket this year. Old styles and 
finish left far behind. Don't buy 
a dollar's worth until you see 
our new book. It's free. Write 
to-day. 




NOTICE THE SHAPE 

THE NEW "SELL" 

WIDE HEEL 
QUARTER BOOT 

An improvement in construction 
that you have waited for a long 
time — originated and perfected 
by us. This boot follows the 
natural lines of the hoof, fits 
closely and comfortably, and 
positively will not rub, pinch, 
chafe bruise or injure the quar- 
ters or heels in any way. Our 
improved method of pressing 
makes the shape permanent, and 
it will outwear any other quar- 
ter boot on the market. Beware 
of imitations of this boot. 

EXAMINE THE CUT 

and consider the following points: 

AT A A the curves are made 
correctly, permitting the 
straps to be drawn tightly 
without pinching or chafing 
the quarters. 

AT B B the curves prevent all 
danger of bruising the heels. 

AT C we have cut away part of 
the boot to show our Improv- 
ed Metal Gore Support. It 
holds the boot in position and 
prevents the stitching from 
ripping at the gore, and posi- 
tively will not injure the 
horse's heels. 




OURNEWWAY 
OFSEWING 
THE STRAPS 
ON THE WRAP 
PERS TO PRE- 
VENT CHAFING 



ANOTHER IMPROVEMENT 

See how the straps are sewed 
to the wrapper of the leg boots. 
All straps are s<5wed to a sep- 
arate piece of leather which is 
securely stitched to the wrapper. 
This prevents chafing and the 
straps will not pull off. Es- 
pecially good for boots with 
kersey wrappers. 

SELL BRAND 

Boots (formerly known as the 
Gilliam) are now carried in 
stock by the leading dealers in 
the West. For free catalogue 
address 

THE SELL HORSE GOODS CO. 
CANTON, OHIO. 



THE CONEY ISLAND 
JOCKEY CLUB 

Race Course: Sheepshead Bay, 
New York. Office: Windsor 
Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave., 
New York. 

THE CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY 
...CLUB STAKES... 

$25,000 
For the June Meeting, 1907 
To Close 

Tuesday, January 1 5, 1 907 

For THREE YEARS OLD— By sub- 
scription of $25 each, to accompany 
the nomination; $250 additional to 
start. Guaranteed Cash Value $25,000, 
of which $3000 to the second and 
$2000 to the third. Should the winner 
of this stake also win The Tidal and 
The Lawrence Realization Stakes. The 
Coney Island Jockey Club will give an 
additional $10,000 to such horse win- 
ning the three events. Weights: Colts 
126 lbs., Geldings 123 lbs., Fillies 121 
lbs.; winners of three races exclusively 
for three years old of the value of 
$5000 each, or of one of the value of 
$15,000, to carry 3 lbs. extra. Non- 
winners of a race exclusively for three 
vears old of the value of $5000 allowed 
7 lbs.; of $3000 allowed 10 lbs. ONE 
MILE AND A HALF. 

Entries to be addressed to the Clerk 
of the Course. 

The Coney Island Jockey Club 
Windsor Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave. 
NEW YORK. 



At the 
^/ Tongues EndU 

STOCK GET JUST ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT TIME 

CQMPRE55ED PURE-SALT BRICKS. 
AND PATENT FEEDERS. 

No wdste.no neglect d II convenience. 
Your dealer his it. Write us for the booh. 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

Broohlyn, iM.y. 



„q C0PA)B 4 



CAPSULES 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums. California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co.. San 



PETER SAXE & SON. 513 32d street. 
Oakland, Cal., Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers for past thirty years. All varie- 
ties Cattle. Horses. Sheep. Hops. High- 
elass breeding stock. Correspondence so- 
Ui-ited. 



PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY 

High Class Art 
— in — " 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 



There is only one 

RUBBEROID ROOFING 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 
WE SELL. IT. 
BONESTELL, RICHARDSON & CO., 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



JAMES H. GROVE 



(R. R. Sayer, Atty.) 



WILLIAM G. TORLEY 



LAWRENCE STOCK FARM 

HIGH CLASS HORSES BOUGHT AND SOLD. BROOD MARES CARED 
FOR AND BRED ACCORDING TO INSTRUCTIONS 

Futurity Stake Candidates and Candidates for the M. and M. and C. of C. 
Stakes Developed. Patronage and Correspondence Solicited. 

LAWRENCE STOCK FARM, Lawrence, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



N *»«..».. 



AIR CUSHION 



No lameness 



They fill with air at each step. 
That's what breaks concussion. 
That's what prevents slipping. 
That's what keeps the foot 

healthy. 
That's what cures lameness. 



PADS 

NoSlipping 



SEE THAT CUSHION? M 



| Order through your horse-shoer 

I Revere Rubber Co. 

? SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

i Boston. San Francisco 




Order 
by 

"NAME" 




TALLION OWNER 



If in need of anything in the lino of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printed. Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Kooks, 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts In stock and made from photos. 
Hoof Pads of all kinds for road or track. Breeding Hobbles, Stallion 
Supports. Pregnators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : : 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St, CHICAGO, 



I 



^.-THE-HO/fc. 

W^^ M. Registered Trade Mark % ^^^j 

V SPAVIN CURE < 




A Sound Horse is a Valuable Asset 



And the wise ones are not waiting for 
winter to pass; the impetus of the 
reigning prosperity makes prospec ts for 



next season too good to wait until the 
last moment before starting in to cure 
an unsound horse. 



Now is the Time, To=day, Not Next Month 



Cold weather need not interfere 
"Save-The-Horse" can be applied in any 
and all extremes of weather — winter or 
summer. The horse can be worked as 
usual and the result is guaranteed. 

A signed contract goes with every 

"SAVE - THE • HORSE 1 '. Permanently 
Cures Spavin. Ringbone (except Low), 
Ringbone. Curb, Thoroughpin, Splint, 
Shoe Boil, Wind Puff. Injured Tendons 
and all lameness without scar or loss 
of hair. Horse may work as usual. 

$5.00 FEB BOTTLE. Written guaran- 
tee — a s binding to protect you as the 



bottle absolutely binding to protect pur- 
chaser. You cannot lose, we take all 
the chances because we know the power 
of the remedy. We can convince you 
with evidence; write for letters, booklet 
and copy of guarantee-contract. 



best legal talent could make it. Send 
for copy and booklet. At druggists and 
dealers or express paid. Scores of let- 
ters to confirm and convince. Send for 
copies Absolute and overwhelming evi- 
dence and certainties as to the unfail- 
ing power of "Save-The-Horse.'' Beware 
of Substitutes anil imitations. "Save- 
The-Horse" is made only by 



Troy Chemical Co.: Binghampton, N. Y. Formerly Troy, N. Y. 
D. E. Newell, 56 Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



FOB SALE. 



The following horses, all in good 
shape, and owned by one party, are of- 
fered for immediate sale at very rea- 
sonable prices: 

Mollie Button 2:11 by Alexander But- 
ton. This mare was a good winner this 
year in Montana and at Los Angeles, and 
can beat 2:10. 

Edward H., roan gelding by Dedron. 
A smooth-going paeer. Has worked in 
2:15. 

Hazel Mac, brood mare by Director 
2:17, in foal to Zolock 2:05%. 

Mare by Diablo 2:09%, in foal to Zo- 
lock 2:05%. 

Mare by James Madison 2:17 a 4, in 
foal to Bonnie McK., son of McKinney. 

Bay filly three-years-old by Bay Bird, 
dam by Sidney. Trotter; showed a half 
in 1:11 and quarter in 35 seconds to cart 
within three months from time she was 
taken up to break. 

Two weanlings by Strathway, a colt 
and filly. 

Horses can be seen at Pleasanton. Ap- 
ply for further particulars to 

DAN MISNEB. Pleasanton, Cal. 




OR BINE 



Cure* Strained Puffy Ankle*. 

Lymphangitis, Bruise* and 
Swelling*. Lamene** and 
Allay* Pain Quickly without 
BliHterlng, removing the hair, or 
laying the horse up. Pleasant to use. 
g^.ilO per bottle, delivered with full 
directions. Book S-C, free. 

ABSOBBTNK, JB., for man- 
kind, 91.no Bottle. Cures Strains, 
Gout, Varicose Veins, Varicocele, 
Hydrocele, Prostatitis, kills pain. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 
54 Monmouth Street Springfield, Mass 

For Sale by — 

Langley & Michaels, San Francisco. 
Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.: Western Wholesale Drug Co., Los 
Angeles, Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sac- 
ramento, Cal.; Pacific Drug Co., Seattle. 
Wash.; Spokane Drug Co., Spokane. 
Wash. 



Saturday, January 5, 1907] 



THE liRREDE RAN D SPORTSMAN 



15 




ITHACA GUNS 



THIS Illustration shows our No. 7 $300 list gun. It is impossible to 
show by a cut the beautiful finish, workmanship and material of this 
grade of gun, it can only be appreciated after you have handled 
~ and examined the gun for yourself. It is fitted with the best Dam- 

ascus or Whitworth Fluid Steel barrels, the finest figured Walnut stock 
that Nature can produce, is hand checkered and engraved in the most 
elaborate manner with dogs and birds inlaid in gold. Send for Art Cata- 
log describing our complete line, 17 grades, ranging in price from $17.75 
net to $300 list. 



Ithaca Gun Company - - Ithaca, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Branch, 1346 Park St., Alameda, Cal. 



GUNS 




And Sporting Goods 

Outing and Rubber Footwear. Good for Wet Weather and Down Town. 

Palace Hardware, 638 Market Street 

Alain Store and Office, 4S8 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



TTfTTYVTYVfTTVfyTlI'VTTyfTTyTffTTfTTTTfTTYfTTTVfTTyTT 

GOLCHER BROS. 

Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 

Guns, Fishing Tackle 
Ammunition 
Sporting Goods 
Temporaries 51 1 Market St., San Francisco 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 




GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, M-r. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Baker Sts., jnst at tlie Panhandle Kntrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 

Best located and healthiest stable in San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand 
for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare 
horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stable and not have their horses frightened 
by autos or cars. 



Ross McMahon 



Awning and 
Tent Co. 



AT THE OLD STAND 

Teamsters' Rain Goods, Bags, Tents, Awnings, Hammocks, Covers 
73 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



San Francisco Riding Club 



ANNEX FOB DRIVING HORSES. 
55 Stalls on Ground Floor; 
5 Exits. Perfect facilities for safety 
and the proper care of Horses. 



OPEN FOR PUBLIC PATRONAGE. 

While this Stable is under the Man- 
agement of San Francisco Riding 
Club, it is not exclusive for the use 
of Members. 



Apply for Further Information to SAN FRANCISCO RIDING CLUB. 

Seventh Avenue and C Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




Take It In Time, 

If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will find that there in nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, WlndpufTs and 
Bunches which will nut yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Quinn's Ointment 

Ithas saved thouwndfl of good horses from the peddler's 
Cftrt and the broken-down horce market. Mr. C\ 11. l»i<-k. 
lens, of Minneapolis. Minn., who conducts one of 'the largest livory i tables in the Northwest, 
writes as follows: I have been uslntf Qulnn-a Olnlmenl I or some time and irltn the Krcatest | 
success. Itokepleasnrelnrecommendlnistttoniylilcnds. No horseman Mionld be with- 
out It in his stable. For curbs, splints, spavin., wlmlpuirs and all bunches It has no eaual." 
> Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by all drunnlsts or sen t by mail. Write us for circulars, 

A? * W- B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 year old Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 year old Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Record . . . .3:19% 
Timed in a Race 2:10^2 

WINNER OF HARTFORD FUTURITY ($8500) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% is by Expedition 2:16% (sire of Biflora 2:09',. Ex- 
ton 2:10%, and 50 others in 2:30 list), son of Electioneer 125 and Lady Russell 
(sister to Maud S. 2:0S% and dam of 5 in 2:30 list), by Harold 113. The dam of 
Bon Voyage is Bon Mot (dam of Bon Voyage 2:12%, Endow 2:14% and Bequeath 
2:20%), by Erin 2:24%; second dam Farce 2:29V4. by Princeps 536; third dam 
Roma (dam of Earce 2:29V4. Romance 2:29 Vfe . and Guyon 2 : 2 7 Vi ) . hy Golddust 50; 
fourth dam Bruna (dam of Woodford Pilot 2:22%), by Pilot Jr. 12. 

Season of 1907 at PLEAS ANTON RACE TRACK. 

where he will be limited to twenty outside mares. 

$50 fnr fh<» ^Pflcnn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or 

vvv iui uic Otasuil should mare not prove in foal. A rare chance to breed 
good mares to an exceptionally high-class and highly bred young stallion. 



Highland C. 



2:\9H TRIAL 2:12 

(At Four Years Old) 

Bred at Highland Farm, Dubuque, Iowa 



By EXPRESSO 29199 (half brother to Expressive (3) 2:12%) by Advertiser 
2:15V,, son of Electioneer 125; dam ALPHA 2:23' 2 (dam of Aegon 2:18%, sire of 
Ageon Star 2:11%, etc.) by Alcantara by George Wilkes 2:22; second dam Jessie 
Pepper (dam of 2 in list and 3 producing sons and 7 producing daughters) by Mam- 
brino Chief 11, etc. 

Terms, $25 For the Season 

HIGHLAND is a grand looking young stallion, eight years old. His breeding 
is most fashionable and his immediate ancestors are producers of nice winners with 
fast records. He is beautifully gaited and lias a perfect disposition. Does not 
pull or want to break at speed, and can be placed at will in a bunch of horses. He 
is a high-class horse and has better than 2:10 speed, and has trotted a quarter in 
31 seconds over the Pleasanton race track. 

HIGHLAND is a coal black horse with one white hind ankle, stands 1G.1 hands 
high and weighs close to 1200 pounds. 

The above Stallions, owned by W. A. Clark Jr., will make a public season. Both 
are entered in the Horse World Stallion Representative Stake for three-year-olds, 
and all their foals will be eligible to this rich event, with nothing to pay until the 
year of the race. 

Address all communications to 

J. O. Gerrety, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 



By J. J. Audubon 
1669S, sire of Au 
dubon Hoy 1:50'* 
Nan Audubon 2-.08K 
Miss Rita 2:08 , 



Audubon Boy 1:59 

DAM, FLAXY (dam of Audubon Boy 1:59%, Royal R. Sheldon 2:04%, Red Elm 
2:16% and gramiam of Simon Kenton 2:13% and Mary Louise 2:27%), by Bourbon 
Wilkes 2345 (sire of Coastman 2:08%, Split Silk 2:08%, Sunland Belle 2:08%, etc.), 
he by George Wilkes 2:22, out of Favorite 2:35% (dam of 1 and live sires of 135 
in 2:30), by Abdallah 15. Flaxy's dam was Kit, by Clark Chief 89 (sire of 6 and 
dame of 35); second dam Nelly by Grey Denmark. J. J. Audubon 16695 was l>\ 
Alcyone 2:27, out of Dolly Pomeroy (dam of Miss Pomeroy 2:22% and J. J. Audu- 
bon 1:59%), by Highland Grey 2:28 (sire of 8, including Highland I>. 2:14%); 
second dam, Nelly 

First and only horse whose entire racing career (56 heats) averages 2:08! 4 . 

First and only horse at 5 years to pace twice in one day in 2:03 1 4 , winning race. 

First and only horse to pace in 2:00' 4 , first trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59 1 4 , second trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace to the half in 57 J 2 seconds. 

First and only horse to pace to the three-quarter in 1:27V£. 

First and only horse to pace in l:59y 2 , first trial second year. 

First and only horse to pace again in 2:00, same week, same year. 

First and only horse to pace twice in 2:00 in one week. 

All of the above without the aid of wind or dust shield and all under unfavor- 
able conditions, the most unfavorable of all being when he paced in 1:59 V&> 
WILL STAND AT AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, TO 
A FEW GOOD MARES. 
TERMS — $100 for the Season. $150, with return privilege or money refunded as 
I may choose. For further particulars address 

J. Y. GATCOMB, 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 



75 PER CENT 



Of all Horse Owners 

and Trainers 



USE AND RECOMMEND 

Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy 




SOLD BY— 

VV. A. Sayre Sacramento, Cal. 

B. T. Crazier Pueblo, Calo. 

J. G. Head & Bro Ogdcn, Utah 

Jubinville & Nance Unite. Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

A. P, Hoska Harness Co 

Tacoma, Wash. 

Tbos. M. Henderson .... Seattle, Wash. 

C, Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

Wm. E. Dctcls Pleasanton, Oal. 

\V. c. Topping San Diego, Cal. 

.Jcpsi n Saddlery Co...l.os Angclis, Cal. 

0. A. Schweitzer Fresno, Cal. 

II. Thornwaldson Fresno, Cal. 

I no. McKerron . . . .San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTigue Han Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros. Harness Mfg. Co 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs., 412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III- 




Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. Jt im- 
proves and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your groer rs or dealer', 
for it. Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food 
Co., C. P. Kertel, Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 5, 1907 



Fine 
Harness 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 



■fr -fry^**** » + •!■ ■!■ .|. 4. .j. .f. .f. .!■ ■!■ .|. ■;. 4. »4^»»4^j ,|. ■;. ,|. ,fr .fr .|. ■}■ ■!■ ^. ■;■ ».;.4. a 4, ,fr .fr ,|. .ft , fr . ; . . ft ,|, ,|. ^. .;. , | . , ; , , fr ,fr ,|. ^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦H 

THE REMINGTON AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 




Was responsible for tl*; big winnings made at the Western Handicaps held at Denver and Los Angeles, and also for the 
fine bags that are made by duck and quail shooters. 



Is the Qun for the Duck and Quail Shooter 

+ No recoil means increased pleasure; the solid breech means absolute safety; the single barrel means ease in handling. You can afford this modern gun 
because it lists at the moderate price of $40. subject to dealers' discount. Remington Arms Co., Ilion, New York 

? The Famous 

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+ Shotgun Ammunition 

+ The Union Metallic Cartridge Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut 

H. Justins, Pacific Coast Sales Manager - Sales Office, 925 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal 

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Model 1907 Self-Loading Rifle. .351 Caliber High Power. 




"The Gun That Shoots Through Steel" 



Standard Rifle, 20-inch round nickel steel barrel, pistol grip, stock of plain walnut, not checked, weight afcout 7 3 4 pounds, number of shots, six, LIST Price, $28.00 

This new rifle, which has the thoroughly tried and satisfactory Winchester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge powerful enough for the largest game. The 
soft point bullet mushrooms splendidly on animal tissue, tearing a wide, killing path. With a. metal patc hed bullet this rille will shoot through a >/i-inch steel 
plate. The Model l!<t>7 is a six-shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and simple and strong in construction. It Is a Serviceable, handy gun from 
butt to muzzle. There are no moving projections on the outside of the gun to catch in the clothing or tear the hands, and no screws or pins to sha!:e loose. It is 
easily loaded and unloaded; easily shot with great rapidity and easily taken down and cleaned. List price, $28.00. The retail price is lower. Ask your dealer to 
show you this gun. Send for circular fully describing 1 this rifle. 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Smith Hammerless and Ejector Guns 



Also Hunter One Trigger 



Won This Year's Grand 

American Handicap 

268 Competitors 

Also Won Grand Eastern 
Handicap 

(Hunter One Trigger) 




SEND FOR" CATALOGUE 



Hunter Arms Co., - - Fulton, N. Y. 
PHIL. B. BEKEART, CO., Inc. 

Temporary Office: No. 1346 Park St., ALAMEDA, Cal. 
(Pacific Coast Branch.) 
A. J. Reach Co., Ithaca Gun Co., Smith & Wesson, E. C. Cook & Cro., 
Marlin Fire Arms Co., Markham Air Rifle Co., Daisy Mfg. Co., Ideal Mfg. Co., 
liridgeport Gun Implement Co., Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, Ham- 
ilton Rifle Co. 



There is NO Gun just as 
good as 
THE PARKER. 



The OLD RELIABLE 
PARKER is positively the 
BEST gun in the 
world. 




SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



PARKER BROS. 

N. Y. Salesroom: 32 Warren St. - 30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 

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Selby 



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LOADED 



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Pacific==Challenge==Superior==Excelsior 

VALLEJ0 JUNCTION, ■ • CONTRA COSTA CO., CAL. 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPO R T S M A N 



[Saturday, January 12. 1907. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 year old Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 year old Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Becord . . . .2:12% 
Timed in a Race 2:10H 

WINNER OP HARTFORD FUTURITY ($8500) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% is by Expedition 2:15% (sire of Biflora 2:09%, Ex- 
ton ^:10%. and 60 others in 2:30 list), son of Klectioneer 125 and Lady Russell 
(sister to Maud S. 2:08% and dam of 5 in 2:30 list), by Harold 113. The dam of 
Bon Voyage is Bon Mot (dam of Bon Voyage 2:12%, Endow 2:14% and Bequeath 
2:20%), by Erin 2:24%; second dam Farce 2:29%, by Princeps 536; third dam 
Roma (dam of Farce 2:29%. Romance 2:29%. and Guyon 2:27%), by Golddust 50; 
fourth dam Bruna (dam of Woodford Pilot 2:22%), by Pilot Jr. 12. 

Season of 1907 at PLEASANTON RACE TRACK. 

where he will be limited to twenty outside mares. 
•Ksfl fnr <hp Cflflcnn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded 
IUI IHC OCdSUII should mare not prove in foal. A rare chance to breed 
good mares to an exceptionally high-class and highly bred young stallion. 



Highland C. 



2A9H TRIAL 2:12 

(At Four Years Old) 
Bred at Highland Farm, Dubuque, Iowa 



By EXPRESSO 29199 (half brother to Expressive (3) 2:12%) by Advertiser 
2:15%, son of Electioneer 125; dam ALPHA 2:23V4 (dam of Aegon 2:18%, sire of 
Ageon Star 2:11%, etc.) by Alcantara by George Wilkes 2:22; second dam Jessie 
Pepper (dam of 2 in list and 3 producing sons and 7 producing daughters) by Mam- 
brino Chief 11, etc. 

Terms, $25 For the Season 

HIGHLAND is a grand looking young stallion, eight years old. His breeding 
Is most fashionable and his immediate ancestors are producers of race winners with 
fast records. He is beautifully gaited and has a perfect disposition. Does not 
pull or want to break at speed, and can be placed at will in a bunch of horses. He 
is a high-class horse and has better than 2:10 speed, and has trotted a quarter In 
31 seconds over the Pleasanton race track. 

HIGHLAND is a coal black horse with one white hind ankle, stands 16.1 hands 
high and weighs close to 1200 pounds. 

The above Stallions, owned by W. A. Clark Jr., will make a public season. Both 
are entered in the Horse World Stallion Representative Stake for three-year-olds, 
and all their foals will be eligible to this rich event, with nothing to pay until the 
year of the race. 

Address all communications to 

J. O. Gerrety, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 



By J. J. Audubon 
16695, sire of Au- 
dubon Boy i:S9V, 
Nan Audubon 2:08', 
Miss Rita 2:08K 



Audubon Boy 1:59 

DAM, FLAXY (dam of Audubon Boy 1:59%, Royal R. Sheldon 2:04%, Red Elm 
2:16% and grandam of Simon Kenton 2:13% and Mary Louise 2:27%), by Bourbon 
Wilkes 2345 (sire of Coastman 2:0S%, Split Silk 2:08%, Sunland Belle 2:08%, etc.), 
he by George Wilkes 2:22, out of Favorite 2:35% (dam of 1 and five sires of 135 
in 2:30), by Abdallah 15. Flaxy*s dam was Kit, by Clark Chief 89 (sire of 6 and 
dame of 35); second dam Nelly by Grey Denmark. J. J. Audubon 16695 was by 
Alcyone 2:27, out of Dolly Pomeroy (dam of Miss Pomeroy 2:22% and J. J. Audu- 
bon 1:59%), by Highland Grey 2:28 (sire of 8, including Highland L. 2:14%); 
second dam, Nelly 

First and only horse whose entire racing career (56 heats) averages 2:08 1 4 . 

First and only horse at 5 years to pace twice in one day in 2:03V 4 , winning race. 

First and only horse to pace in 2:00 1 4 , first trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59' 4 , second trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace to the half in 57 1 2 seconds. 

First and only horse to pace to the three-quarter in 1:27^4. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:5914, first trial second year. 

First and only horse to pace again in 2:00, same week, same year. 

First and only horse to pace twice in 2:00 in one week. 

All of the above without the aid cf wind or dust shield and all under unfavor- 
able conditiens, the most unfavorable of all being when he paced in 1:59' 4 . 

WILL STAND AT AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, TO 
A FEW GOOD MARES. 
TERMS — $100 for the Season. $150, with return privilege or money refunded as 
I may choose. For further particulars address 

J. Y. GATCOMB, 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 




f 



TALLION OWNER 



If in noed of anything in the line of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Books, 
Stallion Service i'.ooks, Horse Cuts in stork and made from photos, 
Hoot Pads of all kinds for road or track. Breeding Hobbles, Stallion 
Supports, I'regnators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : : 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO, 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



CAMPBELL'S 



GALL CURE 



EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 

For GALL BACKS and SHOUL- 
DBES, CRUPPER SORES and SAD- 
DUO GALLS there is none superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS 
USUAL. 

l or BARBED WIRE GUTS, CALKS, 
si BATCHES, Blood Poisoned SORES, 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN it has no 
equal. 

' Its use will absolutely prevent Blood 
Poisoning. In this respect there is no 
Gall Cure offered which can justly 
even claim to be a competitor. We 
placed it on the market relying wholly 
on its merit of success, and notwith- 
standing the fact that comparatively 
little has been done in the way of ad- 
vertising, the sales of 1900 were 100 
per cent greater than the aggregate 

sah'S of Gall Cure preceding that year. This increase was entirely due to its 
MERITS, and it is THE GALL CURE OF THE 20th CENTURY. 

It is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome skin cracks under the 
fetlock which injure and often lay up race horses. 

All Trainers Should Keep It in Their Stables 

PRICE: — 3 OZ. BOX 25c; 7 OZ. BOX 50c; 1 LB. BOX, $1.00 
(Read our ad. on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper) 
Jas. B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 




May We Send You? 

the remarkable records of a string of Super-speedy ones 
sired by 

"AXWORTHY" 3) 2:lSy 2 

These records so clearly illustrate the powers of this peerless 
horse to pass on his own great qualities that no horseman 
can examine them with indifference. 

SSfuSUSSl The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



The "Why" of It 

Those who give first place to race horse quality, constantly 
secure in colts sired by 

"McKINNEY" 2AVA 

horses that would be cheap at twice, (yes at 3 times!), his 
fee. 

Shall we tell you what his colts have done? 

The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



JAMES A. GROVE (R. R. Sayer, Atty.) WILLIAM G. TORLEY 

LAWRENCE STOCK FARM 

HIGH CLASS HORSES BOUGHT AND SOLD. BROOD MARES CARED 
FOR AND BRED ACCORDING TO INSTRUCTIONS 

Futurity Stake Candidates and Candidates for the M. and M. and C. of C. 
Stakes Developed. Patronage and Correspondence Solicited. 

LAWRENCE STOCK FARM, Lawrence, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



'tw | "t " K ^" l " >"*"*"« "l"» , ' * ' , *"»''>"*" 1 

AIR CUSHION 
PADS 



No lameness 



They fill with air at each step. 
That's what breaks concussion 
That's what prevents slipping. 
That's what keeps the foot 

healthy. 
That's what cures lameness. 



SEE THAT CUSHION? % 



Order through yonr horse-shoer 

Revere Rubber Co. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

Boston. " San Francisco 




NoSlipping 





No Breeder Can Afford 
To be Without It 

Price Reduced— 

$4 in Cloth $5 in Leather 

To Be Purchased From 
Foster & O' Rear, Ferry Bldg., San Francisco 
From The Author, Capt. T. B. Merry 
549 Grand Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 


The American 
Thoroughbred 


The Result of 50 Years of Close Study 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Baker Sts., just at tlie Panhandle Kntrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 

Best located and healthiest stable in San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand 
for sale Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare 
horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stable and not have their horses frightened 
by autos or cars. 



San Francisco Riding Club 



ANNEX FOB DRIVING HORSES. 

55 Stalls on Ground Floor; 

5 Exits. Perfect facilities for safety 

and the proper care of Horses. 



OPEN FOB PUBLIC FATBONAGE. 

While this Stable is under the Man- 
agement of San Francisco Biding 
Club, it is not exclusive for the use 
of Members. 



Apply for Further Information to SAN FBANCISCO BIDING CLUB, 
Seventh Avenue and C Street, San Francisco, CaL 



Saturday, January 12, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE WEEKLY 

Breeder and Sportsman 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLEV, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 
OFFICE: 616 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, 
SAN FRANCISCO 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postoffice. 



Terms— One Year $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A CONVENTION of track managers, horse own- 
ers, trainers and representatives of driving clubs 
and fair associations has been called to meet at 
Pleasanton next Saturday, January 19th, for the 
purpose of taking the preliminary steps toward the 
organization of a California circuit of harness rac- 
ing. This convention has been called by the editor 
of this journal at the request of a large number of 
owners and trainers and Pleasanton selected as the 
place of meeting owing to the fact that it is not 
only a central point, easy of access, but for the rea- 
son that a greater number of persons directly in- 
terested in the revival and success of the California 
circuit can be gathered there. There are at least 
a dozen excellent mile and several good half-mile 
tracks in California where harness meetings can 
be held that will be assured of a patronage that will 
meet all expenses, provided dates and programs are 
announced early in the year. A very large number 
of owners and trainers stand ready to enter their 
horses through this entire circuit, but they must 
know what classes are to be given that they may 
train the horses eligible, and not be compelled to 
keep large strings of trotters and pacers at work 
all spring only to learn in the summer that there 
will be purses for less than half of them. These 
owners and trainers have assured us that they do 
not demand a circuit in which all the meetings will 
hang up large purses. They only ask that the tracks 
where meetings can be given unite in the announce- 
ment that they will give meetings this year, giving 
the dates, the classes and the amount of the purses, 
whether they are large or small. The horsemen 
do not wish any associations to offer larger purses 
than it can afford to give, but they do ask that an- 
nouncements be made early enougn to permit them 
to select and train those of their horses that will 
be eligible to entry. It has been suggested that the 
Southern California associations open the circuit 
as early in the summer as possible, arranging the 
order in which they desire to be placed, and that this 
order be such that the racing be held in succeeding 
weeks, no matter whether the associations give 
three, four, five or six days of racing. Los Angeles, 
Santa Ana, San Bernardino and perhaps other places 
in the far south coultl start the season, then the 
horses could be shipped north through Santa Maria, 
Salinas, Del Monte, Hollister, San Jose, Pleasanton, 
Vallejo, Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Woodland, Marys- 
ville and Red Bluff to the Stat^ Fair at Sacramento, 
after which the San Joaquin Valley circuit of four 
or five tracks desires to hold its racing program. 
All the above mentioned places 1 ave mile tracks 
and are cities large enough to hold meetings of 
three or more days. Counting the San Joaquin cir- 
cuit these tracks would furnish twenty weeks of 
racing, but if there are ten which will announce 
meetings, the horsemen will be highly pleased and 
will enter liberally. Besides the mie tracks above 
mentioned, there are excellent half-mile tracks at 
Ukiah, Dixon, and Rocklin, where the people always 
turn out in large numbers to harness meetings and 
these tracks can easily be included in the circuit. 
At Concord, which, though a small town, is located 
in the midst of a large rural population, an excellent 
mile track is located and there is no doubt but a 
good three days' program could get many entries 
and be made to pay. The important thing is for 
the representatives of the driving clubs, fair associa- 
tions and track owners to get together and say what 
they can do. If they, can give $5 GO purses with a 
couple of early closing stakes for a four days' meet- 
ing, the horsemen will hail such an announcement 
with enthusiasm, but if they think a three days' 
meeting with $300 purses is all they can afford, Che 
horsemen will be pleased and thankful and enter 
their horses as liberally as they possibly can. The 



circuit is the first thing and the amount of money 
hung up is a secondary consideration. Notices were 
sent out this week to all parts of the State requesting 
the persons to whom they were addressed to attend 
the convention next Saturday, and an appeal was 
made to have every track and association as well 
as every town where there is a track represented. 
It is hoped that there will be a large attendance 
and that every town mentioned will send some one 
who will be authorized to say that a meeting will 
be given at its track and that purses will be an- 
nounced not later than March 1st. Every person 
interested in the success of a circuit is invited to 
be at Pleasanton next Saturday, January 19th, and 
do what he can towards assisting in the formation 
of a California Circuit. Energy and united action 
will accomplish the desired result. 



THE CHRISTMAS ISSUES of the horse papers 
are now all at hand and they make a great showing. 
The Horse Review of Chicago as usual leads all its 
rivals in the number of pages and the amount of 
special advertising, but the American Horse Breed- 
er, of Boston, the Horse World of Buffalo, the Trotter 
and Pacer of New York and the Horseman of Chi- 
cago are not far behind it, the Boston paper par- 
ticularly being well patronized. Every one of these 
journals contains a large number of articles specially 
prepared for the holiday season, and also many sta- 
tistical tables of great value. The horse owner and 
breeder who wants to keep abreast of the tiems 
must read all these beautifully printed papers as 
each contains tables and statistics that the others 
do not. The Rural Spirit, published at Portland, 
Oregon, also issued a splendid Christmas number of 
76 pages full of good things for the holidays. The 
horse papers all did themselves proud at the close 
of 1906. 



THE DEATH RATE is increasing among the 
horses of San Francisco, and the officers of the Dray- 
men's and Teamsters' Association say many firms 
will be compelled to go out of business unless the 
condition of the streets is greatly improved in the 
very near future. The long spell of cold rainy 
weather has been very severe on horses used in 
San Francisco, owing ' to the poor shelter offered 
many of them, and the very bad condition of the 
streets on which most of the heavy hauling is done. 
There is no doubt but San Francisco horses are 
compelled to pull too heavy loads and the Associa- 
tion should try to regulate this. When dry weather 
comes again the conditions under which our patient 
beasts of burden are now working will be greatly 
improved. As it is, every owner should see that his 
horses have as good care and treatment as it is 
possible to give them. 

BARON WILKES 2:18, the great sire, was sold 
this week to B. Krell of Carthage, Missouri, by Col. 
John Thayer of Lancaster, Mass., who has owned 
the horse for the past eight years. The price at 
which the transfer was made is private. Baron 
Wilkes is getting -along in years, having been foaled 
in 1882, making him twenty-five years of age. He 
is the sire of 131 standard performers, and the last 
Year Book stated that forty-six of his sons had sired 
a total of 212 trotters and seventy-six pacers, while 
fifty of his daughters have produced forty-seven 
trotters and twenty pacers. Baron Wilkes is by Geo. 
Wilkes out of Belle Patchen 2:30%, by Mambrino 
Patchen, second dam Sally Chorister, great brood- 
mare, by Mambrino Chorister, son of .Mambrino 
Chief II. There is a great deal of thoroughbred 
blood in his pedigree 



DO YOIi WANT SOMETHING thai will greatly 
interest you and can be had simply for the asking? 
Write to the Km pi re City Farm, Cuba, New York, 
the home of McKinney 2: 11 '4 and Axworthy (3) 
2:15 1 /6, mention the Breeder and Spoilsman, and 
you will be sent a neat little pamphlet telling what 
MeKinney's colts have done, and one showing the 
remarkable records of a string of youngsters sired 
by Axworthy. Drop a line to Empire City Farms. 
Cuba, New York, mentioning this paper and writing 
your address plainly, and by return mail you will 
gel something that you will be pleased to receive. 



Statistics compiled by interested parties show 
that capital invested in the carriage ami wagon 
industry amounts in the aggregate to the vast sum 
of $137,273,613, and the total value of the annual 
products is $146,560,499. This will indicate the 
magnitude of the business and a most prosperous 
condition of the industry. 



A LIVELY FIGHT is expected to develop in the 
California State Legislature now in session at Sacra- 
mento, over an anti-race track bill, which has been 
prepared by Assemblyman Eshelmap, who hails from 
the University town of Berkeley, lecated next door 
to the California Jockey Club's track at Emeryville. 
Mr. Eshelman, backed by the University authorities, 
has prepared a bill which, should it become a law, 
will prevent racing so close to the State's college. 
Senator Leavitt of Oakland, who has the program 
privilege at the Emeryville track, and who is quite 
an organizer among the Republicans in the Legisla- 
ture, laughs at the University attack on racing and 
thinks Eshclnian's bill will have about as much show 
of passing through this Legislature as a snowball 
would have in reducing the temperature in Hades. 
President Wheeler, of the State University, should 
he pull his coat and get Into the fight behind Eshel- 
man's bill, will probably make the programers in 
the Legislative body think they had been in a con- 
test before he is through With them, even though 
he does not win out, as he is knowr. as an organizer 
and a fighter who has carried through many a meas- 
ure that others have given up as a hopeless task. 



THE STATE FAIR is thus treated in the message 
which Governor Pardee transmitted to the Califor- 
nia Legislature just before he retired from office 
this week: "This State institution, properly con- 
ducted, can be made, as it once was, of great value 
to the agricultural and allied interests of this State. 
The exhibition of 1906, shorn of objectionable fea- 
tures which characterized some of its predecessors, 
proved, by the attendance -at and interest shown in 
it by exhibitors and others, that a real State agricul- 
tural fair, either in districts or at one central place, 
can be worthy of State patronage. In many of the 
other States such exhibitions are considered, as ours 
should be, of the greatest interest and value, and 
are visited by, literally, hundreds of thousands of 
people. I would therefore recommend to the Legis- 
lature the appropriation of sufficient money to prop- 
erly equip and maintain the State agricultural fair 
and to remove from the Capitol grounds the present 
eye-sore of a pavilion and erect, on the fair grounds, 
a respectable, convenient building for the purposes 
of such exhibitions." 



THE North Pacific Rural Spirit had its thirty- 
eighth birthday January 2d. Brother Wisdom prints 
an excellent paper every week and enjoys the pat- 
ronage of all the progressive livestock breeders of 
the Northwest, while many Californians would as 
soon think of getting along without any paper at 
all as to do without the Rural Spirit. Long life to 
the Spirit and may it always prosper. 



HOOF BEATS. . 



Pain caused a postponement of the matinee racing 
at Riverside, which was cairded for January 1st. and 
in which the Riverside and Los Angeles Driving 
clubs were to take part, ft is now proposed to hold 
it February 22d. 



Now that there is talk of a circuit, the Stockton 
papers are advising the rehabilitation of the track 
at that thriving city. Many successful meetings 
have been held there. 



All the horses advertised for sale in these columns 
during the past two weeks by Dan Misner have been 
sold, with the exception of Mollie Button 2:11, and 
a Bay Bird filly, and Mr. Corneal! their owner, 
states that he is not anxious to sell them, so has 
discontinued the advertisement. Mollie Button is 
a good mare in her class in almost any country, 
while the Bay Bird filly looks to have a lot of class. 



Ira Barker Dalziel is kept busy these days. lb' 
visited Pleasanton this week and attended to the 
teeth of a large number of clots and aged horses. It 
is absolutely necessary that a horse should have his 
teeth in shape that he may do well and get all the 
good out of the high -priced has they are being fed 
this winter. 



Win. 10. Detels, the popular harness dealer of 
Pleasanton. offers for sale a It', hand trotting mare, 
seven years old. by James Madison, sire of those 
great mares, Tuna 2:08Ml and Brilliant Cirl 2:08%, 
She is sound and can trot in 2: in. Her I svoyear-old 
tills by Slam B. 2:11V4. entered and paid up on in the 
Pacific Breeders' $7.<>on Futurity, is also offered lor 
sale. See advertisement. 



The New York Trotter and Pacer of last week 
printed on its front page a Hue picture of Lady 
Mowry 2:09'4. joint holder with Early Alice of the 
five-year-old record for trotting mares in 1906. Lady 
Mosvry is by McKinney 2: I I V 4 out of Elect ress 
Wilkes 2:28>/ 2 by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16V£ and was 
bred and is still owned by Mr. .1. ('. Mowry of Ala- 
meda county, California. Henry llelinan drove her 
to her record. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday. January 12, 1907 



*** *S* *5**** *** *?* *** **■* *2* *I**J**J* ****** *** •*.♦ *** *I* *** *** *J* *$• "J**?* ****** "J* *** *** *** 4* *** "** *** *** *** 

| NOTES AND NEWS | 

A A A A A A A A AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA 

• »* ♦* V V* V * »* ***•" ***** *♦* V V V V V V *»* %* %* *»* *** V V » » * ♦ * * * * V *** 

Mr. L. N. Cornell of Porterville, Cal., recently pur- 
chased In Los Angeles a fine three-year-old colt by 
Searchlight 2:03%. 



The first matinee of the new driving club at Bak- 
ersfield win be held on February 22d if the new track 
is ready by that time. Work has been progressing 
very satisfactorily and will probably be completed by 
February 1st. 



David Shaw of Pittsburg, owner of that grandly 
bred stallion The lieau Ideal 2:15% by Dare Devil 
2:09 out of Nettle King, dam of The Abbott 2:03%, 
The Abbe (3) 2:10%. etc., by Manibrino King, has 
sent us a copy of his new catalogue for 1907. He 
has some royally bred horses, among them the five- 
year-old bay mare Sweet Perfume by Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16%. out of Sweetwater 2:26 by Stamboul, second 
dam Manzanita 2:16 by Electioneer. Sweet Perfume 
was bred by Palo Alto Stock Farm. 



Scott McCoy, the well known Eastern trainer, ac- 
companied by his wife, is spending the winter in Los 
Angeles. 



It has not been fully decided by Mr. Philip Byrne 
where he will stand his McKinney stallion. Expres- 
sive Mac, this year. The breeders of Merced want 
him. and there are many at Bakersfield who are also 
writing about having this son of McKinney and that 
great three-year-old filly Expressive 2:12% by Elec- 
tioneer, stand at their town. Expressive Mac stood 
at Hanford last season and every mare but one is in 
foal. 



Will H. Hoy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Hoy of 
Winters, was married New Years day to Miss Julia 
Dahl of Woodland at the home of the bride's par- 
ents. Will has a host of friends among the horse- 
men of California who wish him and his bride much 
happiness and success in their future life. 



Rick DeBernardi is now a resident of Reno, Nev., 
where he says he will probably remain for a few 
years. He writes that the Renoites have recently 
organized a driving club with ninety members, and 
that the Reno track will be put in shape for a first 
class meeting next year. 



In the holiday issue of the Breeder and Sportsman, 
in the article relating to Wayland W., it was correct- 
ly stated that the service fee was $40 for the season, 
but through an error in the card in the Stallion Direc- 
tory it was given as $30. 



Washington's Birthday will be a big day at the 
Salinas race track. On that day the $500 match be- 
tween Sidonis and Steam Beer will be decided. 
Trainer Whitehead is getting Steam Beer on edge 
for the race, while Trainer Williams is putting Si- 
donis through some lively stunts to have him just 
right when the bell rings. There is talk of getting 
up a couple of other races for the same afternoon. 



Petaluma is to have eighteen days of running rac- 
ing in the early spring, the longest race meet ever 
held on the track. The meeting is to fill in the time 
intervening between the close of the races at Oak- 
land and the opening of the meet at Seattle. Harry 
Stover has already begun to make improvements at 
the track. To afford increased stable room for the 
hundreds of horses which will be there he will con- 
struct tier after tier of box stalls in the huge pavilion 
at the park. An attractive program will be arranged 
and some big purses hung up. There will be ex- 
cursions from San Francisco every day, returning 
after the races. The exact date of the meeting will 
soon be announced. 



We used to talk about the list of 2:30 trotters, 
then we thought those that had trotted in 2:20 were 
the only ones worth wasting much conversation on, 
then a horse that was not a member of the 2:25 list 
did not cut much congealed water when tickets for 
the front row were being given out, and now it is 
only the 2:10 trotter that can get into the dress 
circle. How long will it be before the list of 2:10 
performers is so long that the statisticians will make 
a 2:05 list and put all the others in the gallery? 



Blue Hill (2) 2:15%, the winner of the two-year- 
old division of the Horse Review Futurity, second 
money in the Horse Breeder Futurity and third 
money in the Kentucky Futurity, last year, has been 
sold by John P. Hall. Ponkapoag, Mass., to Gregoire 
Oostrkoff. Crimea, Russia. Blue Hill is a son of 
Bingen 2:06%, out of Nelly McGregor 2:14, by Robert 
McGregor 2:17%. Henry Titer will race him again 
next year, after which he goes to Russia. 



Harry -Gosney, by mistake fed his horse a quantity 
of poultry food, thinking the same to be condition 
powder for the animal. The mistake was not noticed 
until the horse had scratched up half the garden and 
showed signs of wanting to set. — Pawhuska, O. T. 
Capital. 

o 

FILES CURED IN 6 TO 14 DAYS. 

PAZO OINTMENT Is guaranteed to cure any case 
of Itching, Blind, Bleeding or Protruding Piles in 6 to 
1 4 days or money refunded. 50c. 



The trotting mare Hawthorne 2:06% is barren this 
year to McKinney 2:11%, and will be bred back to 
that horse in the spring. She dropped her first foal 
to McKinney last year and it died. 



One of the best informed horseman of Cleveland 
states that Louis W. Winans of Brighton, Eng., is 
negotiating for the purchase of Forest City Farm 
with the view of establishing a first class breeding 
farm in the United States. 



H. K. Devereux, secretary of the newly organized 
American Association of Trotting Horse Breeders, 
has established his office in the Hickox Building, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



One hundred and forty-three stallions have been 
named in the Horse World Stallion Representative 
Purse, and all the get of these stallions will be eligi- 
ble to this race, which is to be trotted and paced when 
they are three-year-olds. This is the inaugural purse 
and is for the foals of mares bred in 1906. It looks 
as if the purse would be a very rich one, and the 
fact that there is nothing at all to pay on these foals 
until the year of the race will make it very popular 
with breeders. The only stallions standing for service 
in California that were named in this purse are Mr. 
W. A. Clark Jr.'s stallions, Bon Voyage 2:12% and 
Highland C. 2:19%, and Chas. DeRyder's stallion, 
Star Pointer 1:59%. 



Valencia Farm, at Arrowhead, Cal., owned by Mr. 
Mark Sibley Severance, has recently purchased the 
imported Hackney stallion Royal Pioneer, registered 
No. 8285 in the English Hackney Stud Book. Mr. 
Severance will breed this stallion to a selected lot of 
the farm's trotting bred mares, and will also permit 
him to stand for public service in Southern Califor- 
nia. 



Mr. Hamilton Busbey, for thirty-eight years con- 
nected with Turf, Field and Farm, and author of The 
Trotting and Pacing Horse in America and History 
of the Horse in America, has written an important 
new work entitled Reminiscenses of Men and 
Horses, which Dodd, Mead & Co. will publish this 
spring. Mr. Busbey is one of the foremost authori- 
ties on the horse in America, and has been the 
intimate of all the great breeders and trainers, in- 
cluding Robert Bonner, Benjamin F. Tracy, Senator 
Bailey, etc. The book will contain many interesting 
portraits of both men and horses. 



After this long spell of wet weather the track at 
the State Fair grounds at Sacramento is said to be 
in fine shape to work horses on, and the trainers 
there all say there will be two or three hundred 
horses wintered there when the roads and walks 
about the grounds are graded and graveled, which 
will probably be done this summer. 



Some horses have a very ugly and annoying habit 
of gnawing their feed boxes, mangers and in fact 
evry piece of wood in reach of them when tied in 
the stable, to a rack, fence or gate. A very simple 
and effectual preventive is coal oil. Apply it with 
a brush or rag, so as to saturate the wood and 
they will not touch it as long as the smell or taste 
of the oil remains. Coal oil is quite offensive to 
all kinds of animals. When oiling harness add a 
little kerosene to the harness oil and it will prevent 
rats and mice or anything else from gnawing and 
chewing the leather. 



That little snowstorm (the first in twelve years) 
that visited this part of California last Sunday, drove 
the boys at Pleasanton to the hot stove circuit, and 
how some of them did step their horses! Every 
record ever made was broken a half dozen times be- 
fore the weather moderated. 



Geo. Fox of Clements, Cal., owns a bay colt foal 
of May 1906, that has two crosses of old Robert Mc- 
Gregor 2:17%. The colt is by Cresceus 2:02%, first 
dam by Silver Bow 2:16, second dam Kittie Fox by 
Pancoast, third dam Bessie Bowne by Dictator, 
fourth dam Lady Lightfoot (2) 2:35 by Mambrino 
Time, fifth dam by Paddy Burns, and sixth dam by 
Mosely's Copperhead. The dam of this colt was sent 
East with Silver Bow when Geo. Ketchum leased 
that stallion and foaled this colt by Cresceus after 
she was returned to Mr. Fox. It is a fine looking 
colt, a natural trotter, and should grow into a fast 
one, and be very valuable to the breeders of trotting 
stock here when old enough to do stud duty. 



Pacing blood has been a more potent source of 
harness speed than running blood, and to make use 
of a very plain illustration, will say that pacing 
blood alone and unaided has carried hundreds of 
stallions, mares and geldings into the standard list, 
while running blood alone and unaided has little, 
if anything, to show in this direction. The Blue 
Bulls, the Blue Bucks, the Copperbottoms, the Hals, 
the Hiatogas, the Pilots, the Red Bucks, the Tem- 
pests and others have paced and trotted into the 
standard list without the aid of any known source of 
harness speed, while others belonging to these same 
families, aided by a cross of trotting blood, -have ac- 
complished the same thing. Pacing stallions have 
sired both trotters and pacers; trotting stallions 
have sired both pacers and trotters, and it is no 
trouble to prove these conditions, but it is a mighty 
big undertaking to prove that running-bred stallions 
have sired both trotters and pacers, or established 
a family of harness race horses. — Western Horse- 
man. 



Stam B. 2:11% will probably make the season of 
1907 at some point in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. 
We advise our Oregon friends to send some of their 
best mares to this horse, as he gets good ones and 
fast ones. He was himself one of the greatest three- 
year-old trotters ever seen in this country. 



It seems to be settled that the venerable Chas. 
Marvin will take a year off and give himsejf a let- 
up in 1907, commencing after the February' sale in 
Lexington. All his present holdings, including Bon 
Ami and Mary Stewart, will be sold. 



The new distance rule, which will prevail at meet- 
ings of both associations in the future, should have 
a decided tendency to do away with the laying up 
of heats, especially over the half-mile tracks. 



Homer Davenport says in answer to the question, 
"What is the Arab horse good for?" that from the 
stock recently imi>orted by him he hopes to breed 
the finest park saddle horses in the world, and, by- 
crossing the Arab with the Western broncho, to 
produce polo ponies that are unsurpassed. Mr. 
Davenport states that Arab horses have not been 
used for racing for hundreds of years in Arabia, and 
he concedes that their blood can not improve the 
speed of either the English thoroughbred or the 
American trotter. 



Work has been begun on the fence which is to be 
butt around the new three-quarter-mile track in 
Golden Gate Park. San Francisco. Quite a number 
of the posts had been set when the recent "spell of 
weather" caused a delay, but the work will be re- 
sumed with vigor as soon as the weather settles 
and the fence completed within a few weeks at the 
outside. When this is done the track will be put 
in shape for fast racing, and several matinees are 
already being provided for. The new track prom- 
ises to be one of the most popular places on the 
Coast for speeding trotters and pacers. 



Two ten-thousand-dollar purses are being con- 
sidered by the Minnesota State Fair board for the 
next fair at Hamline. Secretary Randall has always 
made the racing a big feature of this big fair and 
the five-thousand-dollar purses have attracted the 
best horses in the country not racing on the Grand 
Circuit. Now Secretary Randall is ambitious to se- 
cure some of the stars of that circuit. 



The latest thing at Omaha, Neb., of interest to 
friends of the trotter and pacer is a newly organized 
driving club, with many of the best people in Omaha 
interested. The capital stock is placed at $25,000 
and all is practically taken at par. The club ex- 
pects to secure the land formerly occupied by the 
Nebraska State Fair Association and if successful 
will hold weekly matinees over a mile track. 



Secretary Horace Wilson of the Kentucky Trotting 
Horse Breeders' Association, announces that 979 
foals have made the December payment in the seven- 
teenth annual renewal of the rich Kentucky Futurity 
for foals of 1906, which represents a little over 83 
per cent of the original list of 1,200 mares nominated 
last March. This number of foals, while not the 
largest ever named in the history of the Futurity, 
is close up to the record. The largest nominator, 
as usual, is the great Walnut Hall Farm of L. V. 
Harkness, Donerail, Ky., which has sent more Fu- 
turity winners to the post than any other breeding 
farm in America. Seventy-seven of its royally bred 
youngsters by Walnut Hall, Moko, Mobel and other 
noted stallions, and including full brothers and sis- 
ters to Brenda York, The Native, Fereno, Jessie 
Benyon and other stake winners are named by 
this farm. 



Francis Ware asserts that the horse is absolutely 
devoid of memory, affection or intelligence. How 
would Mr. Ware account for the following well au- 
thenticated incident: Last summer a lad driving 
on the road to Brown's Mills, near Greencastle, in 
the Cumberland valley, was seated on the wayside 
beneath a cherry tree eating cherries, when he 
heard the thud of an approaching horse trotting. 
As this was no unusual incident, Johnnie Terry 
straightened himself to see who was coming. Shortly 
a horse appeared without a rider, though he carried 
saddle and bridle. The horse stopped right over 
Johnnie and began to paw the ground and snort, 
which the boy regarded as an invitation to take a 
ride, and climbed on his back. The horse imme- 
diately galloped back in the direction from which 
he had come, and some two miles away stopped 
beside the prostrate figure of a man stretched upon 
the ground, with blood flowing from his head. 
Johnnie dismounted, got some water from an adja- 
cent brook and made the victim of the accident as 
comfortable as possible before going for assistance. 
Meanwhile the horse had trotted off once more, sub- 
sequently returning with a local physician driving 
in his buggy, who knew the horse and his master, 
and carried the latter to his home. The horse's 
name is "Goodfellow." The sufferer had had a mild 
stroke of apoplexy, which was relieved by the blood 
flowing from his head. Though it is not claimed that 
the horse put the stone where his master would 
fall on it, yet he has been brevetted by the ladies 
as "Assistant Surgeon Goodfellow." 

o 

TO CURD A COLD IK ONE DAY 

Take LAXATIVE BROMO Quinine Tablets. Drug- 
gists refund money if it fails to cure. E. W. GROVE'S 
signature is on each box. 25c. 



Saturday, January 12, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



WOULD MAKE A GREAT RACE. 



If a California Circuit should be organized this 
year there would be a grand opportunity for some 
progressive association to offer a good big stake 
for the free-for-all trotting class. It may seem rather 
boastful, but we believe there are sufficient trotters 
now in California whose owners would not balk at 
starting them in a race of this class, provided the 
stake was big enough to make it worth while. Let's 
look over the list of fast ones with records below 2:10 
that will probably be campaigned this year. The 
fastest by the records is Redlac 2:07% by Allerton, 
now in Los Angeles. Then comes Budd Doble's 
great McKinney stallion, Kinney Lou 2:07%, that 
looks good enough to start in any company. Charley 
Belden 2:08%, the biggest winner on the Great West- 
ern Circuit of 1906, is in De Ryder's string at Pleas- 
anton getting ready for the season of 1907. John 
Caldwell 2:08% is over East in Ed Geers string, but 
were there a stake large enough we believe his 
owner, Col. Kirkpatrick, would have him shipped 
home to race here. Helen Norte 2:09%, the light- 
ning fast but erratic daughter of Del Norte, is at 
Pleasanton in De Ryder's string, and Lady Mowry 
2:09%, a 2:05 candidate, is in Henry Helman's 
charge at the same track. Coronado 2:09%, a stal- 
lion that has class enough to win where the heats 
are below 2:10,' is at Los Angeles doing stud duty, 
but a good big purse would very likely get his entry 
and he would doubtless get some of the money. Hazel 
Kinney 2:09% is getting along in years, but she 
might be brought to the track again, while Monterey 
2:09%, although sixteen years old, is young enough 
to trot several heats around his record. Among 
those outside the 2:10 list, North Star 2:13%, now 
a five-year-old, looks well, and the free-for-all class 
would not scare his owner a bit, in fact, we think 
he would rather like to see this son of Nutwood 
Wilkes pitted against the best of them. Thomas 
M. 2:12% would doubtless be entered, as he was a 
good second last year in 2:08%; on an Eastern track. 
Geo. Beckers would very likely name his young mare, 
Helen Dare 2:14, by Zombro in such a stake, and 
Will Durfee would put Bellemont 2:13% in also. L. 
Bachant of Fresno would not hesitate very long in 
naming Athasham 2:12 in such a race if the stake 
was a big one. King Entertainer 2:11%, the grand- 
son of Baron Wilkes that Chas. De Ryder brought 
over with him on his return from his Eastern trip, 
has speed enough and is game enough to live up 
to his name in almost any bunch of trotters that 
could be got together here. There are a number of 
green trotters that might be induced to start for a 
big prize, and among them is Mr. Springer's great 
mare, Sonoma Girl, that won a heat in 2:07 in a 
matinee at Los Angeles on Christmas day. She is of 
free-for-all calibre and would make the winner break 
the California record to beat her. There are several 
others in training that are not called to mind just 
now, but it is very evident that there are sufficient 
trotters in California to fill a free-for-all, provided 
the purse or stake is large enough. If there were 
a good track in San Francisco or Oakland we believe 
a $10,000 free-for-all trotting stake could be offered 
that would not only fill well, but draw enough 
people at the gate to insure the association offering 
it against loss. 

o 

NEW DIRECTORS FOR STATE AGRICULTURAL 
SOCIETY. 



Just before going out of office this week Gov. Par- 
dee apointed several new members of the California 
State Board of Agriculture to succeed those whose 
terms had expired. The new apointments were as 
follows: 

E. W. Howard, San Mateo, vice self, term expired. 
Ben F. Rush, Suisun, vice self, term expired. 
L. J. Rose Jr., Los Angeles, vice self, term expired. 

F. W. Kiesel, Sacramento, vice C. W. Paine, Sac- 
ramento, term expired. 

James Whitaker, Gait, vice self, term expired. 
W. Pierce, Suisun, vice Tom Fox, Sacramento, term 
expired. 

E. P. Heald, San Francisco, vice H. A. Jastro, 
resigned. 

H. A. Jastro, Bakersfield, vice William Land, Sac- 
ramento, term expired. 

The Directors whose terms have not expired are 
as follows: 

Frank H. Burke, San Jose. 

Geo. W. Kingsbury, San Francisco. 

H. B. Stabler, Yuba City. 

J. W. Wilson, Sacramento. 

o 

PLEASANTON MATINEE CLUB. 

The Pleasanton Matinee Club met on the 3d inst. 
and reorganized, electing Mr. Lee Wells president, 
Mr. Thos. Ronan vice-president and Dr. L. A. Cole- 
stock secretary-treasurer. 

It was decided to hold a race meeting on Saturday, 
the 19th of January, which is the day set for the con- 
vention of horsemen and representatives of the 
digerent track associations of the State to meet at 
Pleasanton to organize a harness racing circuit. 

The program will consist of three races, and 
some of the best trotters and pacers at the track 
will compete. 

"Everybody is invited and everything is free" is 
the way the boys put it in their invitation to the 
public. 

As the convention is called to meet during the 
afternoon it is proposed to begin the racing early in 
the day. 



CAPT. JONES IS NOW CAPT. McKINNEY. 



Mr. J. A. Jones of Springbrook, Oregon, has 
changed the name of his stallion Capt. Jones to Capt. 
McKinney. This is a grandly bred horse, being by 
McKinney 2:11% out of Midday Bell by Gossiper. In 
speaking of the recent shipment of eight head of 
horses owned by Mr. Jones to Pleasanton track, 
where they are in charge of E. S. Parker, the Rural 
Spirit of December 28th says: 

"The stable consisted of eight head, including 
Capt. McKinney. The other seven head were all his 
get, solid blacks in color, and a finer bunch of horses, 
the get of one stallion would be hard to find any- 
where. Mr. Jones is having these horses fitted for 
market, and unless sold this winter the two mares, 
Bessie Jones 2:17% and Lady Jones 2:16%', will be 
sent to the Blue Ribbon sale next May. The colts 
are all entered in the California Futurities and 
most likely will be disposed of on the Coast. 

"They are a promising lot, and one of them is out 
of the dam of the Futurity winner, Bellemont. Fol- 
lowing is the list shipped: 

"Capt. McKinney, by McKinney out of Midday 
Belle, by Gossiper; Lady Jones 2:16% by Capt. Mc- 
Kinney, dam by Director; Bessie Jones 2:17% by 
Capt. McKinney, dam Ada Rock (dam of Atlas 
2:15%) by Adirondack; Chehalem (2) by Capt. Mc- 
Kinney, dam Daisy Q. Hill (dam of Bellemont 2:13%) 
by Altamont; The Admiral (2) by Capt. McKinney, 
dam by Caution; The General (yearling) full brother 
to Chehalem; yearling filly by Capt. McKinney, dam 
Lady Beach 2:26%', by Altamont; yearling filly by 
Capt. McKinney out of Alta Norte 2:16% by Del 
Norte." 

o 

RACE AT HANFORD. 



Philip C. Byrne of Hanford writes us that the 
New Years race at the Hanford half mile track 
came off according to announcement, except Hanford 
Jim did not start. Mr. Macedo's gray mare with 
William H. Combs in the cart and Mr. Nelson's 
brown mare by Glenway with M. G. Leggett as pilot, 
scored for the word at 2 p. m. The track was quite 
heavy in spots. Mr. Nelson's mare won in straight 
heats in 1:13%, 1:10 and 1:09. The gray mare is 
by Richmond Chief 2:11% and was timed the second 
heat in 1:11. These pacers are both green, the win- 
ner having been worked but thirty days after being 
taken from a milk wagon. W. H. Combs drove a 
good race and although the game daughter of Rich- 
mond Chief was defeated she was not disgraced by 
any means, but was a little outclassed. She is a fine 
big and fast young mare that will yet make a fast 
record. 

There will be races again at the Kings county fair 
grounds on Washington's Birthday, also on May Day. 

At least 100 and probably 150 head of horses will 
be trained at Hanford during 1907 and there is as- 
surance that large purses will be given for the races 
in September at the Central California Fair. 

o 

A SANTA ROSA OPINION. 



F. W. Kelley, Prop. Breeder and Sportsman: 

Dear Sir — I have just found time to glance through 
your holiday number and I can't express the com- 
pliments, by the use of my knowledge of the English 
language, due you and your editorial staff, for the 
excellent display ads., cuts and unexcelled makeup 
of any Christmas issue you have ever produced to 
my knowledge. While the Breeder and Sportsman 
is always in the lead, this number means much. 
Wishing you a happy and successful year for all 
1907, I am 

Sincerely yours, 

DR. W. H. BUTTON. 
Santa Rosa, Cal., January 6th. 

o 

NEW WORLD'S RECORDS. 



Nine world's records were made on the harness 
racing tracks last year, and of these four were made 
by Sweet Marie, George G., Bolivar and Italia, all 
California bred. These new records were as follows: 
Best mile by a trotter in a race — Sweet Marie 
b. m. by McKinney, dam by Carr's Mara- 



brino 2:03% 

Best mile by trotting stallion in a race, half- 
mile track— .Solon Grattan 2:09% by Grattan, 

dam by Zilcadi Golddust 2:10% 

Best mile by trotting gelding (against time) 
over half-mile track — George G. 2:05% by 

Homeward 2:18%, dam by Junio 2:22 2:08% 

Best mile by a three-year-old pacing filly — 



Brenda Yorke by Moko, dam by Simmons. .2:08% 

Best mile by a pacing mare against time (no 
wind shield)— The Broncho by Stormcliffe 
2:13% (p), dam by Autocrat Jr..- .2:00% 

Hest mile by a pacing mare in a race — Ecstatic 
by Oratorio 2:13, dam Ethelwynn 2:33 by 
Harold 2:01% 

Best mile by a pacing gelding in a race — Boli- 
var by Wayland W. 2:12%, dam by Conn's 
Harry Wilkes 2:00% 

Hest mile by a pacing man?, first season out — 
Italia by Zombro 2:11, dam by A. W. Rich- 
mond 2:04% 

Best mile by a pacing gelding, first season 

out— My Star by Wilstar 2:17%, dam by Billy 

M 2:08% 

o 

Your stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's Napa 

Soda. 



MOVED TO SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 



Mr. M. Henry, owner of that good son of Director, 
Educator, sold his farm near Haywards last summer 
and has recently purchased the place known as the 
Pet Wilson Ranch, nine miles south of Stockton, 
on the French Camp road. The place contains 274 
acres in all, there being 194 acres of the choicest 
black loam land which produces from 2% to 4 tons 
of choice hay per acre each year. The remaining 
80 acres is fine pasture land, on which there is green 
feed the year round. This eighty is sediment soil 
exactly like that on which the Pleasanton track is 
situated, and as it is on level ground a fine mile track 
could be laid on it, but Mr. Henry will probably 
farm it all. The improvements are all in the finest 
condition and comprise a ten-room house, four large 
barns and other outhouses, a blacksmith shop, etc. 
There is a fine lake of water covering an acre of 
ground in the pasture, which is supplied from two 
windmills and is always full. The place is all 
board fenced and divided into several fields and 
paddocks. All the barns are full of the choicest hay 
at the present time. Mr. Henry has built a number 
of new box stalls and is prepared to pasture and 
care for brood mares and horses of all kinds whose 
owners desire them to have extra good care and 
feed. 

Educator is looking as fine as silk and although 
Mr. Henry only moved to his new place a little over 
a month ago, the farmers and horsemen of that lo- 
cality have already sent several mares to be bred 
to Educator. i..r. Henry states that his colts are 
all "fat and fine." He has started to jog Selah by 
McKinney out of Anna by Director, and is also driv- 
ing Will Guthrie by Educator some on the roads, 
which are dry and sandy and fine- for exercising on. 

Anyone wishing their horses, mares or colts taken 
good care of during the rainy season should cor- 
respond with Mr. Henry, addressing him at French 
Camp, San Joaquin county. He will meet horses at 
the boat at Stockton if notified. 

— o 

TROTTING BRED HORSE IN THE SHOW RING. 



Speaking of the results of the judge's work during 
the recent National Horse Show, the New York Her- 
ald tays: 

Trotting bred carriage horses and hackneys, as 
usual, divided the honors in the heavy harness class- 
es at the Garden show, with the following results: 

I lack- 
Trotters, neys. 

First prizes 34 6 

Second prizes 30 7 

Third prizes 24 5 

Fourth prizes 19 7 

Totals 107 25 

In the class for carriage horses, the magnificent 
team of standard-bred trotters, Delight and Delight- 
ful, won championship honors, and were quickly sold 
for $12,000. The champion high stepper, Watson, 
sold for a long price to Alfred G. Vanderbilt, is also 
a hackneyized trotter, being a son of Axtell 2:12. 
Chance, the champion heavy weight saddle horse, to 
whom F. V. Gooch, the English judge, gave the first 
prize, is said by Mr. Gooch to be the best horse up 
to carrying 200 pounds that he has ever seen in 
America; he is also a standard-bred trotter. 

o 

SIRED CHAMPIONS OF TWO COUNTRIES. 



As a sire of five-mile trotters McKinney 2:11% is 
entitled to distinction. He is the sire of the cham- 
pion trotter at this distance, Zambra 12:24, whose 
record was made at Los Angeles in 1902, and is also 
sire of Hopper that won the five-mile championship 
in England recently by trotting the distance in 
12:46% in a winning race. A peculiar feature of the 
American record is the fact that when Zambi a placed 
it to his credit, Hopper was the contending horse, 
and not very far behind Zambra at the finish. Hop- 
per's record for a mile is 2:14%. His dam is the 
pacing mare Cricket 2:10 by Steinway. He was bred 
by Mr. H. W. Meek of San Lorenzo. Zambia's mile 
record is 2:16%. His dam is Nellie Fairmont by 
Fairmont, son of Piedmont. He was bred by the 
late A. G. Gurnet t of San Francisco, and is now 
owned by the well known and popular ticket broker, 
A. Ottinger of this city. 

o 

GOOD MONEY IN MONTANA. 



At a meeting of the Montana Fair and Racing As- 
sociation held at Helena on the 4th inst.. it, was 
decided to hang up $1 (H),(H)0 in purses on the Mon- 
tana circuit this year. Only two meeting dates were 
announced, the others being held in abeyance until 
approved by the board of directors. 

The State Fair will be held in Helena from Sep- 
tember 30 to October 5, and an effort will be made 
to have the present Legislature extend this period. 
Hut to will have four weeks, ending August 19. 

Of the $100,000. which is an increase of $25,000 
over last year, $40,000 will be in stakes and Hie bal- 
ance in purses. Butte, Helena, Anaconda and Mis- 
soula will have five $1000 events each lor harness 
horses. 

o 

Twenty head of horses, bred at Llano Seco Rancho, 
Hutte county, and handled and prepared for market 
by The Haywood Stud, San Mateo, will be offered 
to the highest bidders at ('base's combination sale. 
February 12th. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday. January 12, 1907. 



GREAT VALUE OF TROTTING HORSES. 

United States Government statistics show that 
more than one hundred million dollars is invested 
in the trotting horse breeding industry throughout 
the country. The chief incentive to the Industry 
is the harness racing sport, the pastime of the 
American public through inheritance. 

The trotting bred horse is our own production — 
the national horse of America — hence there is hardly 
a farm barn owned by an American, in any pari 
of the country, which does not shelter one or more 
members of this equine family. 

The American farmer, his wife and children, take 
great pride in giving the pedigree of their trotter, 
way back to Hambletonian 10, or some other famous 
stallion — perhaps as far back as Messenger. It is 
their most valued and loved possession. It may not 
be as beautiful as the animal described by Job, yet it 
is a race horse and carries the blood of race horses. 

Yet to some self-apointed "reformers'* and back- 
woods type politicians, the trotting horse and the 
great industry it represents looks like a side show 
with which they can play ball" as they please. 

While the American trotting bred horse is the 
very best of the equine family as an animal of gen- 
eral utility, yet its origin, improvement and greatest 
value are due directly to its speed qualities, for 
which horses of the best breeds of the world have 
been used from time immemorial. 

Harness racing as the chief incentive has brought 
our horses where they stand to-day, unexcelled and 
unequalled by any other breed in the wide world — 
a source of untold wealth to the country of their 
origin and the envy of the civilized world, including 
the Sultan of Morocco. 

Horse racing is as" old as history, and without this 
incentive the horse stock of the present world would 
have been the flat-footed drafters of the Dutch low- 
lands. And. wagering on the result of horses speed 
contests has been the custom of humanity in all 
ages of civilization. 

If history tells the truth, there is undoubtedly 
less speculation on horse races under modern civil- 
ization than in past periods. Modern people wager 
money only, while the ancient not only bet all their 
earthly possessions, but also their religion, the loser 
to worship the deity of the winner, and this was true 
for entire clans and provinces. 

The result has been the same at all times, the pro- 
duction of swift-footed horses, the pride of all 
nations. 

Excellent and valuable as the trotting bred horse 
is as a profitable type, yet its producers have re- 
ceived absolutely no inducements or assistance of 
any kind from the Government of the country whose 
national horse it is. 

In all the horse history of the world the trotter 
stands alone as a type produced solely by the indi- 
vidual citizens, their efforts and expense from the 
very foundation up to the present state. 

Many of our best citizens have given their lives 
and fortunes to add incalculable millions to the 
wealth of their country and are doing so now, yet 
the so-called "reformers," few of whom could be 
found to have done anything for the lasting benefit 
of their fellowmen, are not only allowed to call the 
breeders and horsemen of the country "gamblers," 
but listened to by men in power and authority. 

One could name hundreds of our best citizens who 
have spent fortunes for the sake of producing and 
owning a fast horse. They have paid liberally to 
have them prepared and trained for the gratification 
of their one desire. Their great outlay of expense 
has benefited myriads of their countrymen, yet they 
are no better than common gamblers in the opinion 
of men whose best qualification in every day life is 
to feed out of the public manger and live like the 
"Lily of the Valley." 

There is no branch of industry in which one 
could enroll the names of more prominent and 
famous Americans than that of the breeding and rac- 
ing—partly for gain, but mostly for pleasure — of 
the great American harness horse. — Exchange. 

o 

SUGGESTION FOR A THREE DAYS' MEETING. 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman: I would like 
to suggest that trainers and owners throughout the 
country send in suggestions for programs for a 
three or four days' meeting at the smaller towns 
on the proposed California Circuit this year. Here 
is mine, and I hope others will follow: 



First Day. 

Green class pace $300 

2:25 trot ■. 300 

2:15 pace , 400 

Second Day. 

2:20 pace $400 

Green class trot 300 

2:15 trot 400 

Third Day. 

Free-for-all pace $500 

Free-for-all trot 500 

2:20 trot .' 400 



I think these classes would get good lists of 
entries anil furnish excellent sport. Yours 

BACK WOODS TRAINER. 

o 

Frank Smith, in charge of the Crabtree horses 
at Savannah. Ga., reports them as wintering finely. 
There is considerable speculation among trotting 
horsemen as to who will drive these horses this sea- 
son. 

o 

Drink. Jackson's Napa Soda. It means health. 



PLEASANTON HORSE NEWS. 



( Times, Jan. 5.) 



J. M. Alviso has Tony Bernal's trotter, Major 
Cook, in training again this season. 

* * * 

Dr. McLaughlin of San Francisco took a run up 
last Sunday to see his horses at the track. 

* * * 

Ed. Parker was thrown out while jogging a colt 
on the track, but the late arrival from the Webfoot 
State is still able to report for duty. 

* * * 

Dan O'Keefe, the Woodland horse shoer, was in 
town this week. 

* * * 

Al. Charvo is taking mounts behind some of Crip- 
pen's horses these days. 

* * * 

Jim Thompson's Diablo pacer is tearing off some 
rattling good miles between showers. 

* * * 

Mr. Greeley, the Oakland capitalist, was here dur- 
ing the week to get up a fine brood mare and colt 
he had at the Santa Rita Stock Farm. 

* * * 

George Ramage turned up safe and sound at Pleas- 
anton the other day. Mr. Ramage. it will be remem- 
bered, gave Lou Dillon most of her early training. 

* * * 

A. B. Rodman of Woodland was in town this ' 
week. Mr. Rodman came down to see his good 
trotter, Pat Rose 2:12%, that Sutherland & Chad- 
bourne are working. 

* * * 

Red Gerrety now has the good McKinney trotter, 
dam She 2:12%, that is owned by Chris Smith of 
San Francisco. This one is considered one of the 
best green prospects at Pleasanton. 

* * * 

Mr. McLaughlin, who owns a half interest in So- 
noma Girl, has returned to Pleasanton. "Mac" was 
at Los Angeles when Mr. Springer drove the mare 
her great mile in 2:07. 

* * * 

Jim Thompson received a handsome offer for his 
screw-tail bull dog from city parties and the dog 
was seen to take the train. These dogs are prob- 
ably the rarest of canine aristocrats and are seldom 
seen this sire of New York. 

* * * 

The horse business lost one of its best supporters 
in the death of James Coffin, that occurred early this 
week. Mr. Coffin was prominently connected with 
the Alameda Sugar Co. and has always been a lover 
of horses. It is stated that the managers of the 
estate have instructed Joe Cuicello to continue to 
train the horses that he has at the track as here- 
tofore. 

* * * 

It has been decided to invite the secretaries of 
the various driving associations of California to- 
gether with their friends, to a banquet in Pleasan- 
ton on Saturday, January 19. The purpose of the 
meeting will be to rehabilitate the racing circuit of 
California. Prominent horsemen from all over the 
t>tate will be here on that day and a very successful 
meeting is looked forward to. 

— — — — o 

AUTOS RUINING THE ROADS. 



[From N. Y. Sun. December 20th. J 

The driveways of Central Park are reported to 
be in such a bad condition that Park Commissioner 
I len nian has appealed to Corporation Counsel Elli- 
son for assistance and will probably have a talk with 
.Mayor McClellan about measures to stop the de- 
terioration of the roads. 

Old employes in the Park Department say that the 
carriage roads were never in such had shape as they 
are now, and that unless something is done soon it 
will be dangerous for light vehicles to use the drives. 
The drivers of these vehicles are obliged to slow up 
when going through the park because of the danger 
of the light springs breaking. 

The holes are made by automobiles using chains 
over the rubber tires to keep the machines from 
skidding. These chains cut up the roadbed, especial- 
ly when the machine turns from a straight course 
while going at a fast speed. It might be thought 
that the damage caused by these chains would be 
slight, but the park officers say that the matter is 
serious. The park is supposed to be maintained 
for all sorts of pleasure carriages, but if the present 
damage goes on unchecked the roads will he fit only 
for trucks and other heavy vehicles, the experts say. 

The holes began to show in the late fall and have 
been increasing in number since. The foreman in 
change of the laborers made their reports about the 
condition of the roads, but nothing could be done 
to prevent an increase of the trouble. Frank Joyce, 
superintendent of 'the park, wrote a letter to the 
commissioner of which this is a part: "Great dam- 
age to the drives of Central Park and Riverside 
Drive has been done by automobiles carrying chains 
over the rubber tires. They tear up the surface 
and the evidence of their destruction is quite ap- 
parent. I would recommend that the matter be called 
to the attention of the police and that they be directed 
to cause the chains to be removed when the machines 
enter the driveways." 



Superintendent Milam of Johnson Farm works 
his yearlings double and has lots of speed on tap. 
At present his fastest team is made up of a colt 
by the farm sire Todd 2:14%, and one by Bingen 

2:06%. 



THE SIXTH AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT. 

The last message of Governor Pardee contains the 
following: 

On August 17, 1904, there was commenced in the 
Superior Court of Los Angeles county an action by 
the Sixth District Agricultural Society against a 
number of individuals who, it was claimed, were un- 
lawfully in possession of the Fair Grounds, and 
claimed the title thereto. The complaint alleges that, 
the Sixth District Agricultural Society holds the 
title to the Fair Grounds upon a trust to use them 
lor maintaining agricultural fairs and for public ex- 
hibitions of live stock, and that the defendants had 
associated themselves together for the purpose of 
asserting ownership to the property and of divert- 
ing the rents and profits thereof to their own use. 

The controversy thus brought into court had its 
beginning as early as the year 1883, when some of 
the defendants in the above mentioned action aqd 
the predecessors in interest of other defendants in- 
stituted an action affecting the title to the Fair 
Grounds, with the result that a judgment was had 
confirming the title in the Society and ordering 
certain conveyances to be made to perfect the record. 

In the year 1897 a second attempt was made to 
obtain control of the property by substantially the 
same group of persons who had made the previous 
attempt. Having organized as association desig- 
nated as "District Agricultural Association No. 6," 
they elected under the provisions of a statute passed 
in 1895 to have a capital stock and distributed the 
shares among themselves and others making like 
claims. The first board of directors of this corpora- 
tion comprised a majority of the directors of the 
Sixth District Agricultural Society. Proceeding 
under the Act of 1895 this new association took 
possession of the Fair Grounds, and ever since has 
exercised ownership over them for the individual 
profit of its stockholders. 

This was the state of affairs when, in the year 
1904, new apointments to the board of directors of 
the Society were made and the control of its affairs 
came into the hands of a majority disposed to con- 
test the claims of the new association. As stated 
above the suit in court to determine the controversy 
was commenced in August, 1904. A Judgment has 
been recently rendered in the case which establishes 
the title and right of possession in the Society, and 
in addition declares that the defendants are ac- 
countable to the Society for rents and profits in 
the sum of $5,584. 

Among other things the court finds as follows: 

"That there is not, and there never was, any 
such corporation as "District Agricultural Associa- 
tion No. 6," and that no such corporation ever in 
fact or of right issued any certificates alleged to 
be certificates of stock. That the attempt to form 
such corporation was without the authority of law, 
and that the acts whereby the defendants and their 
associates attempted to form said corporation, and 
their acts in attempting to create a capital sock and 
to issue so-called certificates of stock, and their 
acts purporting to elect directors, and all other 
proceedings taken by said defendants and their as- 
sociates in connection therewith, were and are a 
mere pretense, sham, and wholly without right, and 
were taken by defendants and their associates as 
a pretext for and in pursuance of a scheme for ob- 
taining the said property of the said Sixth District 
Agricultural Association and converting and using 
it for their own use, profit and gain, and diverting 
it from its lawful and proper purpose and uses. 

This tract of land, now lying in the city of Los 
Angeles is worth several hundred thousand dollars, 
and the State should intervene strenuously to re- 
sist every effort that may be made to take it from 
her. As shown above, the Superior Court, after a 
long and exhaustive trial of the case upon its merits, 
has decided that the property belongs to the State. 
Only a finally adverse decision of the court of last 
resort should cause the State to relinquish to any 
individuals this valuable property. It is more than 
probable that an attempt will be made at this ses- 
sion of the Legislature to so modify the law under 
which the State now holds the property as to make 
it possible for the adverse claimants to gain posses- 
sion of it. All such attempts should be frowned 
upon, and nothing should be done or be permitted 
to be done that will, in any way, weaken the State's 
title to the land. I commend this important matter 
to the especial attention of the Legislature. 

o 

POLO PONY RACING. 



Coronado, Jan. 2. — The pony polo tournament for 
the A. II. Spreckels challenge cup will be contested 
here on the course of the Coronado Country Club, 
March 7 and 9. The cup was put up for the first 
time last year. The events for the first day are as 
follows: 

Selling pony race, all to be sold for $150. one-half 
mile: Galloway race, fifteen hands and under, three- 
fourths mile; polo pony race, three-sixteenths of. a 
mile; pony race, for ponies, three-fourths mile; sell- 
ing race for horses, all to be sold for $400. three- 
fourths mile; race for maiden ponies, one-half mile. 

Second day's events: Pony polo race, one-half 
mile; breeders' stakes, five furlongs; Galloway race 
for Galloways, one mile; race for Spreckels cup, 
for ponies owned by members of any recognized 
polo club or members of any i>olo and pony racing 
association in California, one and one-fourth miles; 
pony race for ponies, one-fourth mile and repeat; 
selling race for horses, one mile. 

Entries, which are to be made to Paul H. Schmidt, 
San Diego, will close February 23. 



Saturday, January 12, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



THERE IS A REASON. 

For all things, or at least, there is suposed to be, 
and there are several reasons you horse fellows can 
give for owning a good one, says a writer in the 
Speed Bulletin. 

Some men breed trotters just as a pastime. They 
like to watch the colts grow and will spend hours 
at a time in their pastures getting acquainted with 
tht babies, and every move they make is noted with 
pleasure by the owner. They can talk by the hour 
about the colts, and they are never tired of telling 
about this one or that and how the "bay mare's" filly 
got lost in the crowd and couldn't find her mother 
and how she tried to make up with another matron 
and got turned down. How that black mare's colt 
could trot while the rest of them all ran, etc. Now 
this is the real pleasure some of you take in the 
trotters. Then there is the man that breeds them 
by the hundreds and probably visits the farm twice 
a year. He trains them all, picks out the most likely 
ones and goes to the races with them. They must 
be fast and furious to suit this man. He wants 
money and his pleasures in raising horses is entirely 
dependent on how much money they will make for 
him. His culls are all sold without any sentiment, 
and when those that have raced well are broken 
down they also must go under the hammer. This 
man's pleasure is to sit in a box at a Grand Circuit 
meeting and watch one of his breeding land a rich 
stake. A mighty good reason, too. 

Then there is the man who never breeds but one 
or two mares. These two mares are the "onliest" 
two alive. These colts are raised at home and are 
a part of the family, in fact, as such are all the 
family he has. He breaks them himself and uses 
them on the road. Perhaps has them trained a lit- 
tle for speed, but his pleasure is not in racing them. 
He wants them in his own barn right behind the 
house, as here he can go and hitch up himself and 
start out looking for Smith. He is satisfied with 
one or two good ones that are home-bred and when 
it is necessary to sell he sells to either some other 
member of the family or to a personal friend. 

Then there is the fellow who don't care what 
the horse is, just so he is a "good hoss." He always 
has a different one every month, and they can all 
step along a little. He can be seen every fine after- 
noon driving slowly down the main street. He wears 
a tan felt-hat. Wears it a little on one side. Is 
smooth shaven, quiet spoken, rather dressy and no 
one knows where he got the horse, but is always 
willing to bet a little that he can "trim you." He 
has no business to own a good one. Can't afford 
it. But it's the only real pleasure this man gets 
out of life. That's reason enough. 

Then there's the minister. He was raised on a 
farm and his father always had good horses. He 
drives a rather rickety buggy and sits up very 
straight himelf. Handles the lines rather loosely 
and never takes the whip out. You would never 
know his horse could step at all unless you should 
happen to catch him some day on a country road 
four miles from town with no one in sight and try 
to go by him. Then he uncovers something that 
can "flv." He really didn't have an idea that his 
horse was so fast, but the man he got him from told 
him that he was an old race horse, but he didn't pay 
any attention to what the man said at the time, and 
horse dealers are so apt to exaggerate, you know. 
His pleasure lies in getting out in the fresh air, away 
from his books and studies. He forgets about the 
great number of souls there are to save when you try 
to drive by him. Isn't that reason enough? 

Then there is the man that likes a horse. Any 
kind of a horse, but preferably a fast one. He doesn't 
like him for what he can do or has done, but just 
because he is a horse. If he is fast he likes him a 
little harder, but the meanest looking, half starved 
broncho is a friend of this fellow. His back yard is 
always full of old pensioners. He will beat your 
brains out if you abuse one when he is around. He 
also has some fast ones, but they are never allowed 
to step enough to get warm, and are always given 
the best of care. 

Then there is the fellow who really has the best 
time of them all. I speak this way because I belong 
to this bunch myself. This fellow has just one. He 
has to work during the day, but in the early morn- 
ing he finds a little time to jog him and when 
September comes his horse is right. He takes a 
vacation about that time. Doesn't tell a soul where 
he is going to be for the next three weeks, but he 
can be found at three different county fairs. He 
enters his horse in every class he can. He picks 
out the easiest one. He does his own driving, sleeps 
in the stall, has one boy to do the dirty work, and 
just enjoys life for three short weeks. The profes- 
sional drivers smile when they see him coming, but 
he has the last chance to laugh. He enjoys having 
them come to him and offer to fix it. "You can't 
beat my horse," they say. "Better split first and 
second money with me." He only smiles and looks 
wise. 

The other fellow gets mad, and says: "Allright, my 
friend, I'll beat you and make you like it. I will 
carry you down to the half so damn fast you will 
be dizzy," etc. They do get to the half about 1:04, 
but the other fellow's horse goes into his straps at 
the three-fourths and he wins in a jog. Now isn't 
that fun? Well, I guess yes, that is reason enough. 

Now there are only three things you want to be 
caught doing. First — Something that affords you 
pleasure. Second — Something that affords you profit. 
Third— Something that is a benefit to your fellows. 
You have them all in a good horse. 



BREEDING CARRIAGE HORSES. 

Following are statements regarding carriage horse 
possibilities in the American horse condensed from 
a valable address by George H. Rommel of the 
United States Bureau of Animal Industry: 

The horse of America is the American trotter and 
it naturally follows that in developing any American 
breed of light horses the blood of the national breed 
will be used to a considerable extent, just as that 
of the thoroughbred has entered into the light breeds 
of England. The trotter has been developed with 
speed as the sole object. This has resulted generally 
in a special type, which is too angular and rangy 
for carriage purposes, but among the horses wh'ch 
hold records of 2:30 or better, there are many which 
conform very closely to the carriage type and do 
not have the faults common to so many fast trot- 
ters. Good sized trotting stallions of good action can 
be found in nearly all sections of the country, and, 
although these horses may not possess extreme rec- 
ords, farmers will generally find it profitable to 
breed to them. One of the most emphatic indica- 
tions of the possibilities of our American trotters for 
this purpose can be seen in the record of trotting 
bred horses in the show rings. Not only are they 
most numerous in the carriage classes in the mar- 
kets, but they are most numerous in the horse shows 
and hold their own against the best that can be 
imported. 

In the export trade trotting bred horses cut a very 
large figure, and have an excellent reputation abroad. 
These horses are found on investigation to be from 
certain families. The blood lines which produce 
them are quite well defined, and they breed harnessy 
stallions with reasonable regularity, considering the 
fact that systematic efforts are not made to produce 
them. In frankness we can not overlook the fact 
that many trotters have very serious faults from 
the carriage standpoint. Big heads, ewe necks, bull 
necks, meaty shoulders, low, long, loose-coupled 
backs, steep rumps, crooked hocks and plain action 
are among the things charged against them. You 
can find even some standard trotters which have 
them all, a great many which have some of them, 
and some which have none. These faults spoil a 
horse for carriage use not so much on account of 
any effect they may have on his usefulness, but be- 
cause they spoil his looks, and in a carriage horse 
good looks is of prime importance. 

On the other hand, the good points of the trotter 
for this purpose are his staying power, endurance 
and speed. Taking the breed as a whole, we must 
confess that the type is not yet uniform and that 
the only thing which has been undoubtedly fixed 
in the hundred-odd years of its development has 
been the ability to transmit speed at the trot or pace. 
We have considered the trotter frankly and it is 
no more than fair that we treat the foreign coach 
breeds in the same way. These breeds excel in 
conformation and action, but they generally lack 
speed and are "soft" without endurance. The Hack- 
neys show more uniformity of type than the con- 
tinental breeds, which do not breed much truer to 
type than the trotter. Here we have on the one 
hand speed and endurance with poor action and con- 
formation, and on the other good conformation, with 
little speed or endurance. 

We have here three ways to slove the problem. 
We can import the foreign coach breeds, trans- 
planting them, as it were, without any infusion of 
native blood; we can blend the foreign and native 
stock, in the effort to get a breed possessing the 
good qualities of both, or we can develop the native 
stock. For reasons set forth elsewhere the direct 
importation plan does not seem to be the most desir- 
able. It might be done by crossing the foreign and 
native stock, but the great objection to this plan is 
the usual objection to cross breeding, that the pro- 
geny of cross bred animals do not breed true; in 
this case, selection to type and in-breeding would 
have to be used before prepotency was obtained. The 
most logical plan seems to me to be the selection of 
the native stock and breeding up from this founda- 
tion. The original animals should conform as close- 
ly as possible to the carriage standard and should 
be from parents rigidly culled and only those of 
good carriage type retained for breeding. The 
power in a breeders' hands to fix a type in this 
way is tremendous and can hardly be measured. 
Sentiment should not be allowed to sway judgment. 
If, after the type is fixed with some degree of 
certainty, it is found that a cross with a foreign 
breed may be desirable, and that the same results 
cannot be obtained by the use of native stock, by 
all means let this be done. 

The farmer who uses light 1,000 to 1, 200-pound 
horses can help in this work by breeding his mares 
to standard bred stallions that conform to the car- 
riage type. If this is done, remember that for 
a salable market horse soundness, conformation, 
action and quality are of far more importance than 
speed. If a horse has a record of 2:30 to 2:20 he has 
all the speed he needs as a sire of carriage horses. 
Speed alone should never be considered by the aver- 
age farmer in selecting a consort for his marcs. It 
has ruined more than one, and it is the most cheer- 
less delusion that ever beset the mind of the man 
with a good mare, a little money, but lots of hopes. 
o 

It is said that Dave McClary, who used to drive 
Star Pointer and gave him his record of 1:69)4, 
has a wonderful pacer by that horse, out of the dam 
of Red Seal 2:10, that Iooks and acts like a com- 
ing world beater. 



MUTUAL BETTING IN FRANCE. 



When bookmakers were barred from doing busi- 
ness in France, little more than a year ago, confin- 
ing speculation on racing to the mutuels, all sorts 
of dire predictions were made as to the future of 
the turf in that country. It was freely claimed thai 
racing would lose its popularity under the exclusive 
system of mutuel ebtting. It is interesting, there- 
fore, to note how the turf has fared during the 
period that has just, closed the first full year of 
racing under the new conditions. 

When making a comparison between receipts and 
profits in 1900 as against 1905 it is sufficient to take 
the balance sheets of the five leading "societies" 
in France. These are the Societie d'Encouragement, 
the Societie des Steeplechase de France, the So- 
cietie Sportive, the Societie de Sport du Demi-Sang 
and the Societie de France. The jurisdiction of the 
societies named is Paris and the neighborhood, 
where most of the important racing is regularly held. 

There have been a few owners who have forsaken 
the turf owing to the "monopoly" control of bet- 
ting, but there have been many newcomers to take 
their places. The opponents of the mutuels have 
frequently stated that the public did not attend meet- 
ings as much now as heretofore. In this statement 
they had truth on their side, but the falling off in 
gate receipts has only amounted to $40,000 for the 
whole year. 

The full turnover amounted to $1,830,000, so if 
one reckons the dethroned bookmakers who have not 
found it worth while to attend racing this past sea- 
son the discrepancy is practically accounted for. It 
can thus be seen that there is no diminution In the 
ordinary race-going population. 

And when one comes to the marked increase in 
mutuel profits it can readily be understood that both 
the French Government and the various race so- 
cieties have cause for self-congratulation. It must 
always be recollected that the profits the race so- 
cieties make do not go into private hands. They 
are all devoted to the advancement of racing, breed- 
ing, etc. 

The mutuels handled about $54,585,000 during the 
year, which shows an increase of about $7,140,000 
on the takings in 1905. The Government and the 
five societies named have the eight per cent de- 
ducted, the Government's share being about $2,185,- 
000, or nearly $225,000 more than in the previous 
year. 

This sum is expended on the poor, irrigation, etc. 
Only last week the Government commissioners 
voted $000,000 for irrigation purposes in 238 dis- 
tricts. 

o 

WINTERING A RACE HORSE. 



Whether or no a horse races better for being win- 
tered in the South or in California in preference to 
the States, where racing is actually held, has been 
discussed for many years, and still the question is 
far from being settled. A trainer has good success 
after having wintered in the North, and is content 
until he strikes a bad season, when he concludes that 
his horses should be wintered in a warmer climate 
If his stable brings home the money the following 
summer, he lays it to the climate. Possibly, how- 
ever, in his Southern quarters, he has had little to 
divert his attention from his horses; maybe he has 
taken the cue from newly formed acquaintances 
among the other trainers and has adopted some of 
their ideas. But, all in all, it is possible that lack 
of proper exercise during the winter is responsible 
for- the poor showing in the following summer. On 
more than one occasion an owner has felt that he 
could not well stand the expense of leaving his horse 
in a trainer's hands all winter. Having a good stable 
ai hand, he takes his horse home, assures the trainer 
that the trotter will be carefully wintered and will 
be returned to his hands in first-class condition for 
another campaign. The trotter has good quarters 
in a comfortable stable, but instead of being driven 
ten or fifteen miles a day, the owner is content to 
see that he is well blanketed and fed and taken out 
once or twice a week. Being afraid that he will in- 
jure the great race horse, he drives him four or five 
miles on these infrequent occasions. The horse looks 
well when he reaches the trainer, generally late in 
the spring. The preparation has to be hurried along. 
Race day comes and the horse fails to finish his miles 
as he did the fall before, and he is condemned as a 
"dog." The truth is, the horse is not physically able 
to carry his speed. Four or five miles a day is just 
about exercise enough to keep a man physically fit. 
Nature made the horse to assist man by carrying 
him faster and longer than ho would be able to walk. 
A good horse can cover from twenty to forty miles 
a day over good roads and keep in good condition. 
If the horse is not capable of more than the four 
or five miles a day, that is too often the limit for the 
race horse horse in winter training, then nature 
would not have made him, for man himself is cap- 
able of that. Perhaps the climate has not so much 
to do with the successful wintering of a race horse 
as the training. — Western Horseman. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 12, 1907. 



REMARKABLE AGED TROTTERS. 



It is somewhat strange, says the Horse Review, 
but thus far no critic appears to have commented 
upon a feature of the racing of 1906, which has seem- 
ed to us striking and unusual. We refer to the num- 
ber of decidedly aged trotters which are among the 
most prominent of the season. 

Sweet Marie 2:02, the champion trotter of the year 
and queen of race mares, is now ten years old. 

Nut Boy 2:07%, the champion stake winner of 
the year, is also ten years of age. 

Mack Mack 2:08, one of the most consistent per- 
formers on the Grand Circuit, is not assigned a 
definate age in the official records, but he has been 
racing in class events for aged horses for seven con- 
secutive seasons, and must be at least ten years of 
age. 

Golddust Maid 2:07 1 / 4, whose winnings approximate 
$10,000, is eleven years of age. 

Bi-Flora 2:09%, winner of seven races on the Great 
Western Circuit — the largest number won by any 
horse, trotter or pacer, campaigned upon it — is eleven 
years of age. 

Solon Grattan 2:09%, who reduced the world's re- 
cord for three consecutive heats over a half-mile 
track to 2:11%. 2:10%, 2:10%, is eleven years of age. 

Roberta 2:09%, one of the new 2:10 trotters of 
the season, is, with one exception, the oldest that 
ever entered the "select list." She has been racing 
for ten consecutive seasons and is now thirteen years 
of age. 

Lastly, there is the extraordinary Van Zandt 2:09, 
winner of the 2:13 trot at Lexington (in which her 
record was made), and a consistent money winner all 
along the line. Her turf debut was made eleven 
years ago and she is now sixteen years of age. 

From a quarter to a half century ago, when the 
generality of trotters were not born, but made — a 
process usually slow and painful — it was the rule, 
rather than the exception, for them to be well past 
their youth before they attained prominence. Lady 
Suffolk 2:29%, was twelve years old when she in- 
augurated the 2:30 list. Flora Temple 2:19%, the 
first 2:20 trotter, was fourteen years old; Goldsmith 
Maid 2:14, the first 2:15 trotter, was seventeen years 
old: Rams 2:13%, the first horse to lower the Maid's 
record, was eleven, and St. Julien 2:11%, who de- 
throned Barus, was ten. But with the event of Maud 
S., who, in 18S0, became champion at the age of six, 
a new era was inaugurated. No champion subse- 
quent to her had been more than seven years old, 
and Lou Dillon 1:58%, whose reign has now lasted 
three years, bids fair to endure for years to come 
was but five when she startled the whole world by 
her unparalleled achivements. 

With the upbuilding of the breed a great change 
has been wrought. Generations of inherited instinct 
and culture has produced a race of trotters which, 
though still far from being perfected, is so immeasur- 
ably improved that in their colthood they often attain 
a rate of speed which was beyond the mature 
attainments of their ancestors. Conditions have 
been reversed; what was formerly the exception has 
become the rule, and what was the rule has become 
the exception. For this reason those trotters which 
we have called atention to above are truly ex- 
ceptional. They have been a "long time in the 
making;" or, rather, it would be more accurate to 
say that their soundness or vitility has enabled them 
to remain before the public and reach their form at 
at ages which finds the average present day race 
horse either permantly retired or hopelessly out- 
classed. 

o 

STOCK SHOW AT DENVER. 



Denver. January 1— The second annual exhibition 
of the Western Stock Show Association will open 
in Denver January 19th and continue to January 
26th. The week beginning January 20th will be 
known as farmers' week in Denver, and in addition 
to the big stock show, conventions are announced as 
follows: 

Colorado Cattle and Horse Growers', January 21st; 
American National Live-stock Association, January 
22-23; National Dry Farming Congress, January 24th; 
National Meeting of Agronomists and Grain Growers 
January 25th. 

In addition to these there will be meetings of 
numerous State agricultural organizations. Secre- 
tary Wilson, Forester Pinchot and Dr. A. D. Melvin 
of the Department of Agriculture will represent the 
Government at the convention and show. 

1 o 

The recent report of Secretary W. H. Knight of 
the American Trotting Association showed a total 
membership of 673, located in thirty-nine different 
States and Territories. 



James Farley of New York, well known as a "strike 
breaker," recently paid $2,700 for the Illinois trotter 
Prince C. 2:15%. Mr. Farley also owns the good 
pacer, Judex 2:08%. 



Up at Medford, Oregon, the enterprising citizens 
of that city have decided to hold a colt show on 
March 1st, when the farmers of the Rogue River 
VaHey are invited to bring in their yearlings and 
two-year-olds and show them for prizes. The own- 
er of Farceur, a draft stallion, has offered $50, $25 
and $15 for first, second and third best colts by his 
horse. The citizens have made up a list of prizes 
for colts of different breeds, and the show will doubt- 
less draw a very large crowd to the town of Medford 
on the day it is held. 



HONOR FOR A HORSE. 

In the basement of the natural history building of 
the University of Kansas, says the Kansas City Star, 
at Lawrence, stands a light bay horse, saddled and 
bridled and looking mildly through his glass eyes. 
It is Comanche, the only living thing— horse or man — 
of Gen. Custer's troops that is positively known to 
have escaped the massacre on the Little Big Horn, 
June 25, 1876. He was ridden by Capt. Keogh, who 
fought so well by the side of his chief and whose 
picture is given prominence in Mulvaney's portrayal 
of the battle. Comanche also appears in the picture, 
and is the only thing that, after the battle, could have 
been drawn from life. 

It is commonly supposed that one of Custer's sol- 
diers, desperately wounded and left for dead on the 
field, survived the battle a few days, but this is de- 
nied by army officers who are familiar with the 
story of the massacre. Even the horses of the troops 
were ruthlessly put to death by the Sioux savages. 
Comanche was probably left for dead, but he es- 
caped and was found after that dreadful day, wan- 
dering on the prairie, near the .battlefield, by a 
trooper of the Seventh, who had been sent to Maj. 
Reno by Gen. Custer the day before the fight. 

He was so badly hurt that it was" thought best to 
kill him to end his misery, but when it was found 
that he was the only living thing that had survived 
the fight, it was resolved to save his life if possible. 
He was cared for by Reno's men as if he were 
human, and wheji he had recovered sufficiently, he 
was sent to Lincoln, Neb., from which place he was 
transferred to Fort Meade. Later he was transferred 
to Fort Riley, Kan., where he passed the remainder 
of his life in idleness at the expense of the Govern- 
ment. He was 15 years old at the time of the battle 
and died at the ripe age of 32. Capt. Keogh was 
the last man who ever rode Comanche. The dignity 
of a Government order was invoked to save the old 
horse from further labor, and at the end of his life, 
by a Government order, L. L. Dyche. propessor of 
systematic zoology of the University of Kansas, 
mounted his skin. 

Comanche was just a plain Texas range horse, 
where he was picked up by a Government agent. 
Long before the battle of the Little Big Horn, he 
saw service in Texas and Indian Territory, and, 
after a battle with the Comanches, was named in 
honor of the event. Being with the army on the 
frontier during all of his active service, he probably 
never knew the luxury of oats until he was put in 
the big box stall at Fort Riley, where he died as a 
pensioner of the United States. But for all that, 
he was a tough beast, as he proved by his recovery 
from wounds that would have settled the fate of a 
whole troop of less hardy horses. When Prof. Dyche 
dissected his carcass, he found where he had been 
shot twice in the hips, once in the lungs, once in 
the shoulder and once in the neck. He carried parts 
of two bullets in his body to the end of his life. 

On Comanche's back, as he stands in the museum, 
is the regulation "7," the insignia of the Seventh 
Cavalry, worked in the cloth. 

o 

TWO WEEKS' GRAND CIRCUIT AT COLUMBUS. 



At the meeting of the board of directors of the 
Columbus, Ohio, Driving Park Company, held a week 
since, E. W. Swisher, a prominent business man of 
that city and for several years past president of 
the Columbus Matinee Club, was elected president, 
while Harry D. Shepard was again chosen secretary 
at an increased salary. 

Daily press reports state that the directors decided 
to give a two weeks' Grand Circuit meeting in 1907, 
and will apply for the dates of September 16th to 
26th, inclusive. Owing to the fact of Oakley Park, 
at Cincinnati, having passed into the hands of a real 
estate firm that intends to cut it up into building 
lots, that track wlil be missed from the Grand Cir- 
cuit and it is the intention of the Columbus associa- 
tion to take over its own date as well as that which 
would be assigned to the Cincinnati meeting. 

It is expected that the Columbus association will 
offer right at $75,000 in stakes and purses, the $10,000 
Hoster-Columbus Stake for trotters and $5,000 Hotel 
Hartman Stake for pacers, to again be the star 
events. It is also likely that the $10,000 Horse Re- 
view Futurity will be decided there. If the two weeks' 
dates are granted by the Grand Circuit stewards, as 
there is every reason to believe that they should be, 
a number of other attractive early closing events 
may also be offered, and the Columbus meeting should 
prove the best and most important trotting meet 
ever held in Ohio. Matthew Spellacy was elected 
vice-president and John G. Dun, treasurer; while the 
following directors were elected: E. W. Swisher. 
Matthew Spellacy, John G. Dun, Carl Hoster, Samuel 
Esswein, Charles Pearce and Jonas Pletsch. Messrs. 
Pletsch and Spellacy are new directors. — American 
Sportsman. 

o 

Billy H. 2:10% by Knight, the horse that W. A. 
Clark Jr. sold at the Old Glory sale last November, 
is making good on the New York speedway, beating 
many of the best of them. 



Members of the New York Driving Club purchased 
about thirty of the horses sold at the Old Glory- 
sale. 



The board of stewards of the Great Western Cir- 
cuit will meet in Milwaukee, Wis., February 18, in 
accordance with a call issued by Secretary W. H. 
Smolllnger. Dates for 1907 will then be arranged. 



FEEDING IDLE HORSES. 



The horse standing in the barn usually gets more 
feed than while at work, for with. his regular feed 
of grain he is generally given an extra allowance 
of hay to keep him from getting lonesome. This is 
a bad practice, as in the absence of exercise he 
has no means of working off this surplus. Without 
an opportunity to move about his digestive tract be- 
comes overloaded and clogged, and general derange- 
ment is apt to follow. 

The difference in the amount of grain and roughage 
that a horse should receive while idle and at work 
has been a subject of much investigation. Scientific 
feeders, experimenters, and large dray and bus com- 
panies, where thousands of horses are used, have 
varied the amount of feed, weighed the horses and 
noted the condition of their health while idle and at 
work. The consensus of opinion is that the horse 
that is idle for a short time, which must stand tied 
in the stall, can use about the same amount of hay 
as when at work, but that the grain ration should 
be cut down at least one-third, and if he must be 
idle a month or longer half of the grain ration will 
answer. The roughage may be slightly increased, 
however, and he must have a chance to exercise. 

The investigators find that a horse at ordinary 
labor demands from 30 to 50 per cent more grain, ac- 
cording to the kind of work he is performing, than 
when idle, to hold a uniform weight. The farmers 
find with ordinary farm horses that have the run of 
the fields and winter pasture during the idle season 
that they require from a quarter to a third as much 
grain to keep them in good condition as they do while 
at heavy farm work. Often then they even gain in 
weight providing the roughage is plentiful and of 
sufficient variety if they are protected from inclement 
weather. 

Although heavy feeding is permissible with ani- 
male of sluggish temperament, whose mission is to 
lay on flesh, like the swine or fattening steer, it is 
altogether different with the horse that is full of 
nervous energy and muscular force. Like the hard 
working man, he cannot take his recreation in idle- 
ness. He must get relief from weariness in change. 
He cannot retire from hard work to recuperate on 
heavy rations while tied in a narrow stall any more 
than could the active man recuperate in bed on three 
hearty meals a day. Like his master, he cannot get 
recuperation from absolute idleness. The hard work- 
ing man takes a rest by going off hunting, fishing 
or to the fair; and if the work horse had his choice 
he would take his vacation in the pasture, where he 
could exercise to suit himself. With shade and an 
opportunity to get away from the flies in summer 
and in winter a chance to run about the straw piles 
or to get at the green field, with shelter from storms, 
he has the needed exercise. This is the most eco- 
nomical means of keeping him while idle and is con- 
ducive to good health and enjoyment. — Farmer. 

o 

IOWA PRIZES FOR CARRIAGE HORSES. 



The Iowa State Board of Agriculture has adopted 
a classification for American carriage horses, which 
is incorporated in the premium list of the Iowa 
State Fair. It is said to be the first classification 
of the kind that has ever been offered by any of 
the American shows, and it is hoped it will have 
the effect of stimulating the trotting horse breeding 
interests in the production of high class horses of 
this type. The new classification is as follows: 

American Carriage Horses. — American trotting 
bred horses of suitable size, conformation, style, 
quality and action for heavy harness service. Size, 
15 hands and over, 15.1 to 15.3 preferred. Entries 
In this class that do not measure up to a high stand- 
ard of excellence will not be awarded a premium. 
For competition in this class, horses must be stand- 
ard bred or registered non-standard. All entries in 
Sections 15, 16, 22 and 23 to be shown in proper har- 
ness and hitched to appropriate vehicle. Conforma- 
tion and action to count 70 per cent, manners 20 per 
cent and appointments 10 per cent. The classes are: 
Stallion, four years old and over; stallion, three years 
old and over; mare, three years old and under four; 
mare, two years old and under three; mare, one year 
old and under two; mare or stallion foal; stallion 
and four of his colts, any age; mare and two of her 
colts, any age; pair of mares or geldings; single mare 
or gelding. The prizes in each class will be $25 for 
first, $15 for second and $10 for third, save in year- 
lings, two and three-year-olds, where the prizes are 
$15, $10, and $5. 

o 

GOOD SUGGESTION. 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Dear Sir: There 
is ■ no doubt but many of our progressive breeders 
would send their mares to some of the best of the 
trotting and pacing stallions owned in the East were 
it not for the tremendous expense of shipping mares 
across the continent. I would suggest that a num- 
ber of California breeders pool their issues and 
send a carload of young mares to some central point 
like Chicago, whence they could be sent to different 
points at small expense. In the summer, after the 
close of the season they could be all shipped back 
together. It would not be advisable to send mares 
that were in foal or had foals at foot as the risk 
would be too great. We need some of the best blood 
of the Eastern stock farms and I do not know a 
better or less expensive way to get it than bv this 
proposed method. PROGRESS. 
o 

California's favorite hot w«ather drink is Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 12, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



A SPIKED GAITING POLE AND A GUIDLESS 
ORATOR. 



[Two good stories by Henry Ten Eyck White.] 
"I'm out in Iowy, back in '98," said the bald- 
headed driver, ' taking away the pumpkin money 
from the natives with a hobbled pacer and one of 
those slide for second trotters that wing in front 
and scramble behind when you shuffle them up for 
a battle on the homestretch. He's a fair thing if 
the heats ain't better'n 2:27 over the cornfield bull 
rings, but in one of them roustabout finishes, where 
you have to hang out spinnakers and balloon jibs to 
round the buoy in the lead, he seems to get aches in 
his heart, and begins to drift toward the outside 
fence. 

"Now, I'm a sailor, all right, because I was raised 
up at Sheboygan, not so far from where Texas Foote 
was born, an' I see right away that unless this racer 
is provided with some sort of a centerboard effect for 
his harness, he's going to land me an' the gig up 
against the outside fence some pleasant autumn day, 
and comb the outfit with sharp pickets, besides toss- 
ing off my piece of the purse and the entrance 
money. Of course, I try a gaiting pole first, but he 
climbs up on that at the three-quarters, and is so 
long getting to the wire my head gets freckled on 
account of my cap going overboard the minute we 
struck a head wind in the back-stretch. It was 
one of those peanut shell dicers the country program- 
mers provide for the home-grown jocks, an' you 
know what chance a skillet like that would have to 
go over my bulging brow and then take care of the 
nut college hump on the back of my head unless it 
had a chin strap and a safety girth attachment to 
boot. 

"Me and the gelding lose out twice with that gait- 
ing pole that he takes for a roosting place, an' then 
I puts it in the bottom of the trunk an' deals again. 
This time it is a head stick, but I don't fall for one 
of those fancy things disguised under the name 
of a guiding rod. No, I just strap one end of a 
plain timber to the harness saddle, and lash the 
other end to the first piece of the headgear that 
comes handy. This keeps his neck from getting 
limber on the wrong side, but the first time I start 
to make a Robert McGregor finish with him he near 
ties himself into a knot reaching for the gaiting pole 
with one end of himself, while the head stick keeps 
him peeking over the fence into the infield with 
the other. He breaks an' smashes his quarter so 
it looks like a cheese with a two-pound wedge cut 
out of it, and once more me and the secretary don't 
do any business at the close of the meeting. 

"On my way, by special gravel train, to the next 
town where I'm entered, I do some deep thinking, 
and when we land I go to the general store and buy 
one of them straps full of spikes to wean calves 
with. I straighten this one out an' nail it to my off 
shaft, where the gaiting pole used to be. Say, it was 
worth the money to see Exhausted Ethelbert the 
next time he tried to pick my pocket in the home 
stretch. He first samples the head stick, but the 
sapling don't even bend, and then he makes his center 
of the stage play for the gaiting pole. He sits down 
hard on them spikes an' discovers right away that 
all is lost. 

"Talk about your whirlwind finishes! Say, when 
that platter-footed Holstein pushed them calf-wean- 
ers into his sirloin steaks he jumped so high that he 
came near hamstringing himself on them as he came 
down. But it was headed straight when he lit — my 
hand finished head stick took care of that — and he 
had resumed trotting when he was up in the air, so 
there was no time lost. I have heard tell about 
Cresceus an' a few others coming under the wire 
like a steam engine, but now I know how it feels to 
sit behind one of that sort. I won eight straight 
free-for-alls that fall in Ioway an' Kansas. 

"No, the horse never felt around any more to find 
out if the calf-weaner was there. I guess mebbe 
he saw it when we brought him out to hitch up." 
* * * * * * i 

"Funny things certainly come off at them Western 
meetings," said a swii>e sitting back of the stove, 
"an' it ain't no bad move for a driver to make a 
bluff when things don't go his way, because a good 
talker gets a standing right away, especially in Ne- 
braska. Now, Dick McMahon is one of the best 
guideless conversationalists I ever met, an' I seen 
him talk himself into first money at a pumpkin 
show after being distanced. 

"Dick was driving a hobbled pacer that went into 
the straps so hard it bumped its lungs up against 
its chest every step it took. He's in a race one 
day, an' Dick has the money down on him over a 
half-mile ring where the association had just been 
organized. They had a copy of the rules in the stand, 
an' the judges had studied them a little, but you know 
what chance a plain farmer man would have to turn 
over the thin leaves of that little book after husking 
corn all day until his thumb looked like a sausage, 
let alone understanding what the talk was about afi »r 
he had glued his glims to it for a couple of hours by 
the light of one of those lamps you get for 300 plug 
of tobacco coupons. 

"Well, going up the back stretch, Dick's pacer 
thumps the straps a shade too hard and one of them 
busts. Of course, he is distanced by 40 rods, but 
Dick never bats his eye. He gariops to the stand 
under the whip so's to arrive before the decision is 
rendered, because Dick was raised out in that country 
an' he knows that after a rube says anything he 
never takes it back except at the end of a fight, an' 
it's a well known fact that all our famous scrappers 
have a cornhusking strain or two in their pedigrees. 
Dick tears up into the judges' stand. 



" 'I hope you gentlemen wasn't thinking of distanc- 
ing my horse,' he says, real polite. 

" 'We certainly was,' says the presiding Judge. 

" 'In that case,' says Dick, 'I would like to explain 
the matter. The rules say that in case of an unavoid- 
able accident the judges have power to place a horse 
finishing back of the flag.' 

" 'That's all right, young feller,' says one of the 
judges, 'but bustin' hobbles ain't no unavoidable 
thing. Unavoidable is something that, can't be 
helped.' 

" 'Well,' says Dick, 'you can't help that horse being 
a hobbled pacer, can you, an' if he wasn't one there 
wouldn't be any occasion for him to wear the straps, 
would there? Remember, gentlemen, that you are 
here to deal out equal and exact justice to all. It 
is the proud boast of every denizen of this fair land 
that the constitution is the palladium of our liber- 
ties. What does the constitution say?' says Dick, 
peeling off his jacket an' beginning to warm up. 
What does it say? It says that every man shall be 
protected in the pursuit of life, liberty an' happiness 
— that's what it says! Ain't I pursuing happiness — 
and a darn long ways behind it, at that — when I drive 
a hobbled pacer. Ain't I taking a chance for my life 
the minute I get the word on a half-mile track in a 
field of fifteen pacers, all trying to grab the pole at 
the first turn? Do not let it be said, gentlemen, that 
in the grand old State of Nebraska, whose waving 
fields of corn blazon to the world the energy and 
opulence of its noble people, an injustice was done 
to a stranger — to one who comes among you from 
afar on a peaceful mission, having for its object the 
entertainment of the intelligent spectators I see here 
to-day. The sport of harness racing is by and for the 
common people, the toiling masses whose few days 
of pleasure are snatched from the maw of hungry 
capitalists, who would deny them even the little joys 
that tend to make out lives less bleak and forbidding 
than they otherwise would be. 

" 'Shall it be trumpeted forth in the public prints 
that in the State of Nebraska judges could be found 
who did not give that compendium of enactments I 
see in the hands of your president a calm, dispassion- 
ate and illuminating exposition? I trust not.' 

"Then Dick makes his getaway. 

"The judges begin to think it over, and then, of 
course, they're lost. That free silver oratory gets 
them. 

" 'I dunno what a palladium is,' says one, 'but 
that young man from Chicago certainly talked awful 
sassy about it. Mebbe it's a rule we overlooked.' 

" 'He said he was a denizen of this proud land,' 
says No. 2 on the bench. 'I ain't never met any deni- 
zens, an' I bin right here in Corntassel county bet- 
ter'n forty year, but I bet any man that says he's 
a denizen means it' 

"That was all. Dick got the decision, an' between 
his speech an' the time the judges took to think it 
over his pacer got such a rest that he came out an' 
won the deciding heat too easy. Yes, sir, he did; an' 
right now, if there was a free-for-all speech-making 
tournament, no holts barred, an' Bryan, an' Cicero 
an' a few more like that was entered, them Nebraska 
boys would name McMahon at the post and expect 
to get all the money." 

o 

HORSE BREEDING EXPERIMENTS. 



At a dinner given by Arthur G. Leonard in honor 
of the British judge at the International, the Live 
Stock World says, some highly interesting facts 
were brought out in connection with what is being 
done by foreign governments and our own in build- 
ing up the best types of horses. Professor W. L. 
Carlyle, who is in charge of the Government stud of 
American coach horses, being established in Colorado, 
has recently spent several months investigating 
horse breeding conditions in other countries. It is 
well known that Germany and Belgium pay out large 
sums of money for the encouragement of breeding 
proper types of horses, and that the Government 
supervision of studs is very exacting. It is not gen- 
erally understood, however, to what extent help is 
given horse breeding, especially in France. Some- 
thing like $350,000 to $400,000 per year is devoted bj 
the Government to the purpose. It is true that prac- 
tically all of this great amount is raised by the Gov- 
ernment's share in gambling on horse racing. As Pro- 
fessor Carlyle says, it is about the best example he 
knows of for a good use for bad money. At any rate, 
it makes the $3,500 a year that we are devoting to 
the development of an American coach horse type 
seen very insignificant by comparison. As Professor 
Davenport pointed out, such a meager expenditure 
for such a worthy purpose is calculated to prolong 
the day of improvement very needlessly. If one 
can spend money for water storage canals and bat- 
tleships by the millions, one surely ought to be 
ashamed of putting out a paltry $3,500 a year, when 
a little country like France finds it profitable to 
spend one hundred times as much. 

o 

The latest news from Minneapolis is to the effect 
that M. W. Savage has purchased one of Gentry 
Pros.' dog and pony shows. The plans for the show 
have not yet been given to the public, but it is under- 
stood that Mr. Savage has some novel scheme in 
view in connection with this venture. One of the 
features that will appeal to the horse fraternity is 
moving pictures of Dan Patch 1:55 doing a mile 
in 2:00. The picture machine was placed on the 
rear of an automobile, the machine being run on the 
outside of the track, almost at right angles with the 
pacer. The films have caught every stride of the 
horse during the entire mile, and are said to be 
very clear. — Horse Review. 



CHARIOT RACING AT PASADENA. 



Ten thousand people were at Tournament. Park, 
Pasadena, on New Years day to see the chariot rac- 
ing, broncho busting and other sports that had been 
arranged for the day at the half mile track. 

Excitement reached fever heat when P. Michel of 
Los Angeles led "Mac" Wiggins of Pasadena across 
the starting line in the final heat of the chariot races. 
Michel had a little the better of the start, but by the 
time the charioteers had made the circuit of the 
track both teams were racing madly neck and neck. 

With a roar and rattle the chariots rushed by the 
stand. Michel had a little the advantage by being 
on the pole, and during the first half of the second 
and last round gained a small lead. This was nearly 
eaten up on the last turn by Wiggins, and coming 
down the stretch the two teams ran almost neck and 
neck, with Michel's four slightly in the lead. He 
won the race with not more than three feet to spare. 

Much rivalry has existed between these two driv- 
ers for a long time, and the feeling was taken up 
by thousands of the spectators who jumped to their 
feet excitedly and cheered for their favorites. The 
sentiment ran mostly to Wiggins, although Michel 
had many followers, because they knew his prowess. 
The latter is a powerful man who has handled horses 
all his life and is an adept in piloting "fours" as 
well as a single racer. 

Every one of his horses is a thoroughbred and a 
racer. In making the turns Michel would cling so 
close to the fence that the people in the grandstand 
would heave a sigh of relief when the maddened 
horses reached the straightaway. The animals were 
all large and powerful and only a man of herculean 
strength could keep them in check at all. At the 
end of the first heat in which Michel raced, his team 
got the best of him for a quarter of a mile, but un- 
aided he pulled them in from their runaway pace. 

In the Roman chariot races four chariots were en- 
tered — Neil McGirk of Hemet, E. J. Levengood of 
Santa Ana, P. B. Michel of Pasadena and "Mac" 
Wiggins of Pasadena. Two chariots ran in each heat, 
going twice around the track. The winners of the 
first and second matches ran the final heat and the 
winner of this received the first prize. $750, and the 
loser the second prize of $500. The losers of the 
first and second heats ran a heat, the winner re- 
ceiving the third prize of $400 and the loser the 
fourth prize of $300. 

Michel and Levengood ran in the second heat, but 
the former outclassed the Santa Ana entry from the 
start, winning by twenty-five yards. Wiggins and 
McGirk tried for place in the finals in the first heat, 
and for a time the race was close and exciting. After 
the circuit of the track had been made once, Wig- 
gins began to draw away from the Hemet man and 
crossed the line many yards to the good. 

The two losers tried out for third place in the 
third heat, but McGirk was so much speedier than 
his opponent that he had crossed the tape before 
Levengood had made the last turn. Some excuses 
may be offered for the poor showing that the Santa 
Ana man made. Before the start his horses became 
wild and dashed madly around the track twice be- 
fore they could be brought to a standstill. The mad 
dash somewhat winded the animals and in the second 
round they lagged considerably. 

A number of Arizona cowboys tried their hand 
in bronco busting and the antics they were compelled 
to cut up kept the spectators in a roar for more than 
twenty minutes. 

One lonely, fiery-eyed plains bronco was brought 
into the space before the grandstand, and then the 
fun began. It was no small job to get the saddle on 
the animal, but this was nothing to what was to 
come. 

With an agile jump one of the cowboys landed on 
the animal's back, and quick as a flash the bronco 
was off. The horse suddenly braced itself and slid 
twenty feet. Then came the antics. Every thing 
that a horse could have a copyright on was tried, 
bucking, seesawing, falling, jumping in every direc- 
tion, standing all but on its head, and on its hind 
legs and at times resembling more a doubled-up 
jackknife than anything else. 

The Asellus race, consisting of a chariot race with 
burros instead of horses, amused the crowd for the 
space of about four minutes while the little animals 
made the circuit of the half-mile track once. Kings- 
ley N. Stevens won the race, after considerable 1 hard 
work in getting his stubborn brutes going in the 
right direction. E. F. Kohler trotted in in fine style 
about ten yards behind the winner. The winner was 
given a cash prize of $100. 

Four young men entered for the two-mile relay 
race on horseback. Dr. A. .1. Ellis of Pasadena won, 
with Dr. F. It. Emery a close second. Dr. A. H. Sav- 
age came in third. Dr. L. ('. Deming dropped out 
when he lost his saddle and got so far behind that 
there was no chance of catching up. At the conclu- 
sion of each circuit of the track the riders would 
jump off their horses and jump on one that was 
waiting. Three prizes of $50, $25 and $15 were 
awarded the winners. 



While we will have to wait until the Year Hook 
is printed before official figures can be given, the 
best records obtainable show that Chimes 2:30%, 
Hobby Hums 2:19% and Parole 2:16 are tied for first 
place as sires of new standard trotters and pacers in 
1906. They have thirteen each. Allerton 2:09%. 
Boreal 2:15% and Walnut Boy 2:1\% are equal in 
the list with eleven each. Then comes the dead On- 
ward 2: 25 % with ten. Last year Gambetta Wilkes 
was first with nineteen and Prodigal second with six- 
teen. Ashland Wilkes 2:17*4 was third with fifteen 
and Axworthy 2:15% fourth last year with twelve. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 12, 1907. 



$ 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

Conducted by J. X. DeWitt 



O 
+ 



AN APPEAL TO STRIPED BASS ANGLERS. 



DECREASE OF WILD WATERFOWL. 



Mr. Wells W. Cooke of the Biological Survey, of 
the United States Agricultural Department, in a re- 
cent bulletin gives some interesting comment and 
data on the subject of the threatened extinction of 
several species of wild water fowl. 

Our coast sportsemn can readily see the fallacy 
of recent statements emanating from the malcontent 
sportsmen ( ?) of certain interior sections, who claim 
that "there are just as many ducks as ever" and 
that "a reduction of the bag-limit" and a "non-sale 
law" are not necessary. Never was a more selfish, 
or reactionary idea uttered. No matter how plenti- 
ful the birds are; modern firearms and methods, 
and the incessent draft on the visible supply will 
have a depleting effect in a far shorter time than 
the ordinary observer realizes. 

Another matter that by some means or other 
should be attended to, and that as soon as practic- 
able, is the gathering of wild fowl eggs on the north- 
ern breeding grounds. The breeding places are 
despoiled of the eggs for a growing commercial 
purpose — that is, securing the albumen, for use in 
photography. 

The following circular letter issued by four of the 
leading northern sporting goods dealers will give an 
insight into what will eventually develop into a 
serious evil: 

"We are advised by well informed sportsmen 
that the eggs of wild duck, geese and other migra- 
tory game birds are taken in large quantities from 
the nests in the great breeding places of Alaska, 
Hritisb Columbia, and Alberta, thus insuring speedy 
extinction of these birds to our mutual loss." 

"We wish to enlist your help in correcting this 
state of affairs, knowing that you have the neces- 
sary facilities for investigating the facts and in- 
forming yourselves and us in regard to the law and 
getting same enforced, and of obtaining necessarv 
legislation to control this practice, which if continu- 
ed will end in a large loss of business to you and 
the dealers on the Pacific Coast." 

"We think the British sportsmen and authorities 
can be aroused to cooperate with all of us in the 
matter, and if we have laws governing this matter, 
on which the writer is not at present fully informed! 
we certainly can get them enforced in Alaska." 

"Kindly give us an expression of opinion as to 
what you think can be done. This certainlv is of 
importance to you." 

There is a law against the despoiling of wild 
birds' nests in this State, and we believe such a 
law is also in force in Oregon and Washington. 
We do not now recall whether the Alaskan game 
laws cover the subject or not, the remedv is com- 
paratively an easy one. 

The bulletin above referred to is the following: 

"As a result of present conditions the once num- 
erous wood duck, it may be cited as an example, is 
likely soon to be known only from books or by tra- 
dition: the regal canvasback and the lordly redhead, 
formerly so common along the Alantic coast, are 
now exceedingly scarce. The great flocks that form- 
erly covered Chesapeake bay are of the past; a few 
still winter on the coast of the Carolinas. 

"Other species are fast disappearing and in time 
it is feared that most of the splendid water fowl of 
America will have joined the buffalo in the realm 
of tradition. 

"So rapidly are the species diminishing in num- 
bers in certain states, that the market supply is 
already threatened and Minnesota has found it 
necessary to pass laws prohibiting not only the export 
of ducks, but even their sale within the state limits. 
Such radical legislation in a state where only a 
few years since the water fowl abounded on every 
lake and waterway reveals how pressing the value 
and importance of prohibitive laws. 

"The prairie districts of central Canada, compris- 
ing large portions of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta are the ducks' paradise. Within the United 
States, this favored region extends to the north- 
eastern part of Montana, the northen part of North 
Dakota and the northeastern half of Minnesota. The 
whole vast region is crowded with lakes, ponds, 
sloughs and marshes that furnish ideal nesting con- 
ditions and unlimited food. 

"Forty years ago every available nook was crowded 
with water fowl and the whole region, 200 miles 
wide by 400 miles long, was a great breeding colonv 
and numbered its inhabitants by the hundreds of 
thousands. In southern Wisconsin, for example, in 
1864, every ]>ond hole and every damp depression 
had its brood of young ducks. During the next fif- 
teen years the farming of the region changed from 
grain raising to dairying, the former duck nurseries 
became grazing grounds and the duck hunting there 
was a thing of tl.e past. 

"And so the story goes of the breaking up of the 
ducks' western home. In 1877 there were twelve 
species of ducks breeding commonly in northwestern 
Illinois; a brood of young ducks there now is very 
rare. In 1885 fourteen species bred near Clear Lake, 
Iowa, and sixteen species at Heron Lake, Minnesota. 
Scarcely any may be found at those places now. 
Thicker settlement of the country and more de- 
termined onslaughts on the birds have driven them 
away. 



"Time was, within the memory of comparatively 
young hunters, when the various indentations along 
the Atlantic coast were crowded with ducks, geese 
and swan in season. The Chesapeake bay, in par- 
ticular, was a hunter's paradise, and royal sport 
could always be expected there each fall and winter. 

"The Atlantic coast from the Chesapeake bay to 
South Carolina, is especially favorable as a winter 
home for ducks, and until recent years countless 
flocks swarmed this district. Northeastern North 
America, east of Hudson bay, harbors only a small 
number of ducks in summer. They prefer the mar- 
shes, lakes and streams -of the districts west of 
Hudson bay, and the great bulk of North American 
ducks breed there. 

"Thus there are two great districts, one suitable 
for a summer home and the other for winter, and 
the migration route between them is nearly north- 
west and southeast, between Cheasapeake bay and 
Great Slave lake. 

"There have been many illustrations to prove that 
if protected a number of species that formerly reared 
their young in the United Staes, but were driven 
away by persecution, would return and re-occupy 
old breeding ground. The constant harassing and 
attacking of the migratory birds, however, is no 
worse than organized raids that are made on their 
nests in the far north for the capture of eggs. 

"The fall slaughter of canvasbacks, redheads and 
other fine varieties of ducks, as well as geese and 
swans, along the Atlantic coast and along the streams 
of the middle west has been teriffic during recent 
years. Then, when the birds are leisurely journing 
north again in the spring to set up their summer 
housekeping, the same murderous onslaughts have 
been made. 

"No wonder that the discouraged fowls, sadly re- 
duced in numbers and fearful of every appearance 
of man, are now steering clear of their former haunts 
and are seeking the remote localities that are left 
to them. 

o 

SAN FRANCISCO STRIPED BASS CLUB. 



Members of the San Francisco Striped Bass Club 
and invited guests met at the club's annual banquet 
last Wednesday evening. The evening was enlivened 
by speeches and stories of different jolly anglers and 
was throughout a very enjoyable affair. Among 
those who spoke on fish and fish protection topics 
were .lames M. Thomson (who holds the record for 
the largest striped bass taken in local waters with 
rod and line, a 32-pounder). S. A. Wells, James 
Lynch, M. J. Geary, J. X. De Witt, Chas. P. Landresse, 
H. Copeland, H. Franzen and others. 

Mr. Thomson was presented by President Lynch 
with the high-hook medal for his record catch. Judg- 
ing from recent experiences of the salt water rod 
men, he will wear the token a long time before it is 
surrendered to the angler who will show a better 
record. In response to unanimous request Mr. 
Thomson told the story of the catch at Wingo, a 
capture made under adverse circumstances of 
weather and water. 

The election of officers for the ensuing year re- 
sulted in the unanimous selection of the old board, 
viz: James Lynch, president; Henry Franzen, vice- 
president; Jas. S. Turner, secretary; Chas. H. 
Kewell, treasurer. 

The chair appointed the following gentlemen as 
a committee on prizes: Messrs. J. M. Thomson, H. 
Franzen, Landresse and Copeland. 

Among those present were J. G. Miss, H. Copeland, 
F. Franzen, H. Franzen, Chas. H. Kewell. Odin Kelso, 
Chas. P. Landresse, N. E. Linfield, Jas. Lynch, 
Timothy Lynch, Nat E. Mead, H. A. Lengstack, F. 
H. Smith, Jas. M. Thomson, Carl Thomson, Wm. S. 
Turner, Jas. S. Turner, Jules Weil. M. J. Geary, R. 
C. Miller, Sam Wells, C. Kemper, J. X. De Witt, S. 
Colin, II. A. Thomson, Amile Aceret. 



A meeting of the California Anglers' Association 
will be held on Wednesday evening next at the resi- 
dence of Mr. J. Uri, 1849 O'Farrell street, this city. 

The meeting will be open to all anglers and sports- 
men, and is called in the interest of fish protection 
and the necessary legislation for that purpose which 
can be secured during the present session of the 
Legislature. 



The San Francisco Fly-Casting Club will hold the 
annual meeting and election of officers on the first 
Tuesday in February, the 5th. 



The closed season on steelhead in tidewater will 
begin February 1st and ensue until April 1st this 
year. 



The recent rains have effectually put the much 
anticipated and longed for steelhead fishing in Rus- 
sian river out of the question for this season. 



The following pertinent remarks by Mr. Al M. 
dimming, a well known local sportsman, should 
appeal strongly not only to anglers and other sports- 
men, but to the people at large, whose interest is 
more at stake than that of the angling fraternity: 

At the present session of the Legislature of Cali- 
fornia an effort will be made to get protection for 
striped bass, a fish which was at one time plentiful 
in these waters, but which is now so scarce that the 
species is in danger of becoming extinct. 

I want to appeal to every sportsman, every angler. 
and indeed to every citizen to lend his aid in getting 
a law passed that will give the striped bass a chance 
to propagate; and if the law is made stringent 
enough and properly enforced I think that the rem- 
nant of the great multitude of striped bass which 
formerly made its home in San Francisco bay and the 
tributaries thereof will again multiply and increase 
to such an extent that the fish will once more come 
within the reach of people who cannot afford to pay 
a fancy price for their food. 

The present law, which allows striped bass to be 
caught at all seasons of the year — the only restriction 
being that the fish must weigh over three pounds — 
does very little good in the way of protection. The 
fish which conies into the bay and makes its way 
to the sloughs and shallow bays to spawn is an easy 
prey for the net fishermen, who know the habits of 
the striped bass, and stretch their nets across the 
mouths of the sloughs which the fish frequents dur- 
ing the spawning season and, capturing nearly an 
entire school at each haul, not only destroys the 
fish itself but thousands of its eggs, which if it 
were given a chance to spawn would result in the 
propagation of many more striped bass. 

The angler who goes out with rod and line for 
a day's sport takes only a few fish, and the number 
which falls to the lot of the pleasure seeker is a 
small matter compared to the immense hauls made 
by the men who fish for the markets. The fish are 
now so scarce that the kind of a law that is required 
is one that will give the striped bass absolute pro- 
tection for at least six months in each year — protec- 
tion from all fishermen, amateur as well as profes- 
sional. It would would be a good thing if the law- 
makers would pass a bill making it illegal to take 
a striped bass at any time for two or three years. 

The striped bass is such a favorite with fish 
catchers that they have been made a special mark 
by the fishermen. 

As the striped bass feeds mostly in the shallow 
waters they are easily located by the fishermen and 
easily taken. 

Another thing which is helping to destroy the 
bass is the amount of oil which floats on the sur- 
face of the waters since oil has become so common 
for fuel. Steamers, mills and other oil-burning plants, 
in disregard of the law, allow oil to run into the 
water. When this occurs in a shallow place the ebb 
of the tides leaves the oil on the mud flats and the 
small crustaceans and other marine life which exist 
there are killed. Fish which feed on these are de- 
prived of a source of food and the striped bass is 
one of the sufferers. 

It has been claimed that the striped bass is still 
plentiful in the waters of the bay and its tributary 
bays and sloughs. This I emphatically deny, and 
I can point to the places where striped bass were 
plentiful only four or five years ago and where it 
is almost impossible to get a fish now. San An tone 
slough, which is a branch of Petaluma creek, was 
at one time the best striped bass fishing ground 
hereabouts. During the season an angler could, with 
rod and line, take forty or fifty pounds of fish in an 
afternoon. Now if half a dozen boats catch an aver- 
age of one fish to the boat it is considered good fish- 
ing. San Leandro bay and the flats- off the south 
shore of Alameda were also good fishing grounds, and 
on Sundays and holidays many people from the cities 
of Oakland and Alameda went out and enjoyed a good 
day's sport and came back with enough fish to give 
their own and their neighbors' families a fish din- 
ner. Now the fish are not there. Except for an oc- 
casional bass the man who trolls on the Alameda 
shore gets nothing for his pains. San Pablo bay. Rac- 
coon straits and other former haunts are the same. 

The size of the fish has also decreased. In former 
years the bass ran to a good weight and catches 
of fish weighing thirty pounds or more were fre- 
quent. Now the fish run small, a ten-pound 
fish is a big one, and fish of that size are taken in- 
frequently. 

Let us all get together and try to save what is left 
of this splendid fish. Don't let them disappear as 
the shad and the sturgeon have from our waters. Let 
everybody who likes a striped bass, either as a game 
fish or as a table delicacy, do what he can to further 
protective legislation. Get up petitions to the Legis- 
lators and endeavor to have a law passed that will 
really protect the fish. 



A few steelhead have been taken recently in the 
white house" i>ool near Point Reyes. 



Anglers have found excellent accommodation at 
I '.rooks dairy, near the "white house" pool. This 
arrangement is a long sought for advantage to many 
fishermen and hunters. 



A recent report from Vallejo states that duck 
hunting on the sloughs near Cordelia and west of 
Suisun is bringing so little reward that nearly every 
club plans to close the season next Sunday. The 
cold weather is said to be responsible for driving 
the ducks to the lowlands about Tulare and further 
south. 



Saturday, January 12, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



GAME LAWS WILL BE FOUGHT. 



IRISH WATER SPANIEL NOTES. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



• The game law situation in Sacramento and an 
outline of the coming campign is hinted in the 
Sacramento Bee as follows: 

Torrents and tempests of eloquence are destined 
to be turned loose at the present session of the 
Legislature, when work of revising the game laws 
is undertaken. Many interests are at stake. Organ- 
izations of sportsmen are nowhere stronger than 
they are in California, and their influence on game 
legislation has been great in the past — great enough 
to secure the passage of laws prohibiting the sale 
of birds that were once common articles of food. 
The legislation reserving doves and quail for the 
sportmen was hard fought before the Senate and 
Assembly, and later before the Supreme Court. But 
the law stood, and it drove a large class out of the 
business of market hunting, and cut off the majority 
of the people of the State from dove pot-pies and 
broiled quail on toast. The only wild game bird left 
that is extensively marketed, and can be enjoyed by 
all classes, is the duck. A determined fight will be 
made to add to the list of gamest aside exclusively 
for the sportsman. There will likewise be a power- 
ful opposition to the movement. 

Voluminous arguments and vociferous logic are 
advanced by both sides. The sportsmen conventions 
of Monterey and Sacramento adopted resolutions 
conflicting in almost every particular. The Monterey 
Convention advocated radical restrictions, the pro- 
hibition of the sale of ducks and the reduction of the 
bag limit from fifty to twenty-five. The Sacramento 
Convention favored the existing legislation, recom- 
mending, however, that the bag limit be reduced to 
thirty-five. The people who like to eat ducks, but 
belong to no shooting club and are not sportsmen 
are universally opposed to any legislation that would 
either abridge their priviliges of buying ducks in 
the market or would cause an advance in the price 
of the birds. 

It is argued by those who advocate the non-sale 
of ducks that the only way of keeping market hunters 
from exceeding the bag limit and from slaughtering 
and netting the birds by the hundreds is to remove 
the temptation by keeping ducks out of the market. 
A county employing a single game warden cannot 
expect him, lone handed, to patrol a territory of 
hundreds of square miles, where much hunting is 
done in places widely distant. 

It recently came to light that one San Francisco 
market received more than 2100 ducks, sent in separ- 
ate bags, many coming from Sacramento County. 
The unbounded slaughter of ducks cannot be wholly 
checked, as a single arrest and conviction, here and 
there, is not sufficient to restrain numbers of hunters 
to observing the bag limit, when disregard for it is 
so profitable and detection so unlikely. 

Sportsmen and others who will oppose the attempt 
to prohibit the sale of ducks will also advocate more 
thorough and systematic means of enforcing the 
present game laws. More money is needed to assist 
in the detection and prosecution of market hunters 
and others who persist in killing birds in excess of 
the limit of fifty. There is only a single man to 
the whole of Sacramento County. However vigilant 
he may be, he cannot begin to patrol the territory 
under him. 



The present Legislature will have no little trouble 
in revising the fish and game laws to give satisfac- 
tion to the sportsmen and at the same time to secure 
justice for the fishermen and market hunters. The 
interests of these classes directly conflict in nearly 
every particular. The class that makes its living 
fishing and hunting is opposed to any changes in 
the existing game laws, while the sportsmen have 
a budget of revisions to submit to the Legislature 
as soon as the time for action comes. 

Sportsmen are clamoring for revision of the bass 
fishing laws, especially those referring to striped 
bass, a fish believed to be fast decreasing. There is 
no closed -season for the taking of striped bass at 
present. Seining is not prohibited and fish less than 
three pounds in weight are not allowed to be caught. 
At all times of the year the fish are caught, and 
but little attention has been paid to the laws against 
the taking of fish under three pounds in weight. As 
a result, the fish have diminished in no inconsider- 
able degree. 

To offset the speedy decrease in the supply, the 
anglers of the bay cities now want to protect the 
fish for six months out of the year. Sportsmen be- 
lieve this heroic remedy to be necessary for the pro- 
tection of one of the greatest food fishes in existance, 
and they will try to demonstrate it to the Legislature. 

The greatest defect in the present system of game 
protection is not the lack of sufficiet law on tne sub- 
ject, but the languid and ineffectual enforcement of 
it. Most counties make but little pretense to detect 
or to punish offenders against the game laws. Many 
other counties like Sacramento, employ a single game 
warden to perform the immense task of patroling a 
large territory with a multitude of hunters breaking 
the law in widely-scatered sections of it. 

When ducks are slaughtered by the hundreds 
and bass taken in centals, they are likely to decrease 
speedily. If the law was observed or enforced, the 
protection would be sufficient to keep both from de- 
clining in any great degree. Sportsmen, however 
seem to think that the way to make the game laws 
more effective is to keep on enacting more law. 
There has been no attempt to better the warden 
service by appropriations to support a larger force. 
Instead of trying harder to punish violations of the 
bag-limit law on ducks, many sportsmen wish to 
take the birds out of the market entirely, so as to 
remove the incentive for exceeding the limit. 



We are pleased to note that there is a growing 
demand among Coast sportsmen for good Irish 
Water Spaniels. The breed is a favorite with our 
duck and goose hunters and many so-called "rat- 
tailed" Irish Water Spaniels are in use, among them , 
we have frequently seen the white and brown pied 
variety familiar in the north of Ireland. Others 
again are apparently crossbreds between the Irish 
Setter and poor specimens of the Irish Water Span- 
iels—the main essential to the thoroughbred hall 
mark being the "rat tail." However, popular edu- 
cation in what is desirable and correct in the breed 
is rapidly spreading and in consequence there is 
now a noticeable and growing improvement in the 
breed. 

Those good ones, Ch. Dennis C, Ch. Dan Maloney, 
Belle Marsh, Biddy Maloney et al., have produced 
a progeny of quality— bred on good blood lines, a 
number of these dogs and bitches have been mated 
with new blood much, apparently, to improvement 
and maintenance of stamina and vitality. 

Much is due to the efforts of Mr. Wm. Bay in 
encouraging a wider recognition and keeping up the 
standard of the breed here. 

A recent litter of puppies by The Gossoon (a grand 
looking and winning son of Ch. Dennis C. out of 
Belle Marsh) out of Dublin (an equally good looking 
young bitch by Ch. Our Chance out of imp. Rowdy 
Girl) have been so well thought of by different fan- 
ciers who have seen them that Mr. Bay could have 
disposed of thrice the number. Among the pur- 
chasers are the Rev. Moore-Smith, who bought two 
puppies before the litter was whelped. Mr. Guy T. 
Wayman recently bought his second one and Dr. 
Leonard, the former owner of Ch. Dennis C, was 
so pleased with what he saw that he also bought 
a dog puppy. Mr. Lyndon Gray of Burlingame has 
another of the youngsters. All in all, it looks very 
encouraging for bringing prominently to the front 
ere long a very useful and heretofore surprisingly 
neglected breed. 

o 

Good Angling in Prospect. 

The Brookdale Hatchery, which is fostered by the 
the joint interests of Santa Cruz county and the 
Southern Pacific Railroad is considered to be the 
equal in equipment and working facilities to any in 
this State. The output of young fry for this coming 
season will be a record breaker. Superintendent 
Shebley by experience has found that the streams 
of Santa Cruz county are particularly adapted for 
the propagation of trout in all varieties. He has 
just received a consignment of 1,100,000 salmon eggs, 
70,000 lake trout, 50,000 brook trout. The latter 
were releived from Mackinaw, on Lake Michigan. 

The Brookdale Hatchery, which has been especial- 
ly successful in the propagation of steelhead trout 
since it was established, will also be able to hatch 
several million eggs during the coming season. The 
spawn for the latter come from the steelheads that 
ascend the San Lorenzo river and Soquel creek. 

Santa Cruz county has thirty-two fine trout streams 
available for anglers, and the institution of the 
hatchery will in course of time repay the outlay 
many times over. 

Pompano Fishing. 

Nearly a hundred San Luis Obispo disciples of 
Isaak Walton were attracted to. Port Harford one 
day last week on hearing that a school of pompanos 
were frisking in the waters of the Pacific. It was 
the biggest fishing day for a year and the long wharf 
was lined with fishermen, all of whom enjoyed ex- 
cellent sport. 

The pompanos are the same or similar to the 
pomfret, one of the rarest and most expensive fishes 
in the country, and sought after by epicures the 
world over. The price in San Francisco is now 
$1 a pound, and sometimes reaches $1.25. 

They are found in the Mediterranean Sea, Indian 
Ocean, in Japanese waters, where the fish is known 
as the "butter fish," and on the Pacific Coast of 
the United States. Among those who had good sport 
and made good catches were E. A. Swart bout, "Doc." 
Hovis and Tom Pruitt. Mr. Swart hout is the most 
ardent fisherman in the county, and can be seen al- 
most every Sunday at Port Harford. Besides the 
pompanos there was an abundance of smelt and 
flounders. 



A Sailor Hunted Buffalo. 

A rather funny story comes from Seattle in a re- 
cent press dispatch. A French ship made port one 
day and laid off the city at a point opposite a well 
wooded section. The chief mate being something of 
a sportsman dug up his old-fashioned pin-fire gun 
from his sea chest, oiled it up and made ready for 
a hunting expedition on shore as soon as opportunity 
allowed. One morning he was rowed ashore by a 
boat's crew and started off on a hunt. The district 
he prospected struck him as being a hunters' para- 
dise, plenty of birds, good traveling over walks, etc. 
He made a fair bag of small feathered game, and 
when rounded up by a policeman, who was paralyzed 
with astonishment, he was stalking a buffalo and 
just about to fill the animal's hide with bird shot. 

The unsophisticated sailor was enjoying his hunt 
in the public park of Seattle. He was detained in 
the calaboose until his captain was notified and came 
to the rescue with $20, the amount of One which 
a judge quickly imposed on Johnny Crapaud. 



Chas. II. Babcock was at the Texas Field Trial 
Club's meeting at Stoneham, Texas, beginning Tues- 
day, December 18th. His string was composed of 
dogs owned by W. W. Van Arsdale of San Francisco 
and Thos. Johnson of Winnipeg. Manitoba. The 
Derby dogs were in bad shape. Colton and Huldah 
had distemper and Sonoma was down with pneu- 
monia. 

Mr. Robert W. Shaw, president of the club, judged 
the running of the two Members' Stakes and Mr. 
Babcock and E. E. Taylor the open Derby. The 
decisions of the judges were popular. 

Avalon, owned by W. W. Van Arsdale, won the 
All-Age Stake, and in doing so made a splendid show- 
ing as a high class field trial dog. He went fast 
and wide, through heavy going full of cockle-burrs. 
He made a neat bevy find and bandied his birds in 
a stylish manner. On scattered birds he did not do 
quite so well. 

Manitoba Mike, owned by Thos. Johnson, won sec- 
ond place in the All-Age. Mike was put down on 
ground unfavorable to show his best speed and 
range. His work was clean and he made the best 
of his opportunities. 

Avalon's win over Ch. Mike is quite a victory. 
Avalon was third in the last Pacific Coast All-Age, 
January, 1906. 

The United States trials at Grand Junction, Tenn., 
beginning next Monday, will bring together the best 
in the United States and will be worth the time and 
expense for any lover of field trials to attend. 

The Derby entries number forty-seven English 
Setters and twelve Pointers. 

The All-Age entries number twenty-five English 
Setters, one Irish Setter and eight Pointers. W. W. 
Van Arsdale's Policy Girl and T. J. Pace's Prince 
Whitestone are in this stake. 

The Championship Stake entries number thirteen 
English Setters and three Pointers. If the draw 
happens to bring Jesse Rodfield's Count Gladstone 
and Prince Whitestone together this heat will be the 
most intensely watched one in the stake, providing 
conditions enable the dogs to do any work. Policy 
Girl is also entered in this stake. 

In reading over the entries it looks as if the class 
and quality was ahead of any previous meeting of 
the club. 

It is the intention of the management ol the West- 
minster Kennel Club to show, if possible, in New 
York next month, all the prominent field trial win- 
ning Pointers and English Setters. Two classes, 
one for each sex, for both Setters and Pointers, have 
been opened for dogs placed in any of the open field 
trials of the United States and Canada. A number 
of cup specials are also offered for field trial dogs. 

Stilleto Kennels have sold their good Bull Terrier 
dog, Woodlawn Baron, to Mr. Geo. E. Hoppe of Mem- 
phis, Tenn. He was sent East last week in fine fettle 
and will make his Eastern debut at the Memphis 
bench show next week. Notwithstanding a six-day 
trip in charge of an express messenger, we believe 
Baron will make good. 

Stilleto Kennels' Ch. Meg. Merrilies II. began the 
new year auspiciously with a litter of eight fine, 
healthy puppies whelped on the 2d Inst. Woodlawn 
Baron is the sire of the litter. 

Stilleto Madge (a daughter of Meg's), first puppy 
and novice and reserve winners bitches at Stockton 
last October will be sent East to be served by either 
Bloomsbury Bo'swain or Edgewood Battle. Madge 
is a bitch of much merit and will be given the best 
possible chance to ascertain what she can do as a 
producing matron. 

P L. Harlev of Redlands has sold his Airedale 
bitch Bonnie Briar (Ch. New King-Brighton Park 
Virginia) to a fancier at Hilo, island of Hawaii. Bon- 
nie won first puppy and novice bitches at the Venice 
show last September and was, we believed, a very 
promising one. She will be bred to Endcliffe Royalty 
unless we miss our guess before being sent to the 
islands. 

From Wilson Kennels, Morristown, N. J., a bitch 
puppy by Moorestown Mike-Ainsflyer Judy is now on 
the way to the same fancier via steamer around Cape 
Horn. A dog puppy from Gregmoore Farm Kennels. 
Mo., by Colne Master Royal-Colne Lowland Lass has 
been ordered. 

This looks as if a very ambitious Airedale kennel 
is now established at Hilo. The breed has not been 
represented in the Hawaiian Islands. 

The fancier here referred to has also some very 
good Bull Terrier stock, a bitch puppy by Blooms- 
bury Blazor-Wyancote Magnet Is al present en voy- 
age via New York. 

The field, as yet, in the islands, is rather a small 
one, hut there is a growing interest and the gentle- 
man above referred to will, no doubt, find much 
recreation and sport in the maintainance of his 
kennels and also, we trust sincerely, enough profit 
and support to make the progeny of the Hilo kennels 
much sought for by the dog lovers of the far away 
ocean islands. 

o 

The case of the market hunters who are tempor- 
arily restrained from shooting on the Miller & Lux 
hinds in Merced county and which is now pending in 
the Superior Court is one resulting from the natural 
antagonism between the market hunter and the city 
sportsman. It seems that the professionals were 
allowed to hunt on the corporation's lands, but were 
ordered not to trespass on two preserves. The com- 
mand was so frequently violated that at last it was 
decided to restrain the men from hunting on any 
of the lands. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 12, 1907. 



OLD TIME GUN-FITTING AND TESTING. 



We live in an age when scientifis gun-fitting is prop- 
erly recognized as being an essential part of the ed- 
ucation of a man wishing to shoot at his best. The 
system of gun-fitting as we know it to-day is of course 
an introduction of quite recent years, but the try-gun 
is simply an evolution by natural means of certain 
methods employed years and years ago by our fore- 
fathers and based upon observations which they were 
almost as well able to make in those days as we are 
at the present time, with all our advantages of mod- 
ern science. 

It is an example, one may quote the remarks of 
a writer on the subject of choosing a gun, the arti- 
cle in question having been written about the latter 
end of the eighteenth century. This old-fashioned 
scribe prefaces what he has to say by observing that 
the adapting of guns to persons of different size and 
makes is a thing of no small importance, and as such, 
deserves to be specially considered. He then pro- 
ceeds: "In the choice of a gun there is certain! v 
much more to be attended to than the size and the 
more of it. For instance, in a gun for a broad- 
shouldered man the stock is bent sideways, as if you 
would lay the lock upon your knee and could bend 
it with your hands. The point or toe of the butt turns 
out a little to the right, so as to bring the breech of 
the barrel to his eye in a direct line with the muzzle 
without constraint or bending his head much, which 
a short-necked man cannot do without danger of 
hurting his face." It will be noticed from the fore- 
going that the writer uses exactly the same terms 
and expressions as are in common usage to-day 
■ini'um ihe trade, and those versed in the technical 
language of gun-making. There was, however, in 
those days, so it seems, no equivalent for our present 
expressions 'cast-off" or "cast-on," as applied to the 
bending of the stock to the right or left respectively. 

We next come to a word or two of advice to 
slender men, as follows: "A gun whose stock is of a 
middling bend and length, and quite straight side- 
ways (i. e., neither 'cast-off' nor 'cast-on') best suits 
a slender man with a longish neck. Suppose the 
length of the butt from the breach (six) about 15V6 
inches, and if a straight line is laid to the barrel, so 
as to touch the muzzle and breach, and continued to 
the butt, you will find that the butt drops about 3 
inches from the line (and for a man who has a short 
neck it ought to drop a quarter of an inch more) 
and at about 3 inches from the butt, where the face 
touches, about 2% inches; and if he is broad and 
stout and his arms cannot reach so far forward, 14 
inches or 14* in length from the breach to butt 
may be sufficient." 

The most remarkable thing about these observa- 
tions is the excessive amount of bend recommended. 
"A man of slender build with a longish neck" would 
not be advised by his gun-maker nowadavs to adopt 
a gun with a bend of 2V 2 — 3, but would be more like- 
ly to be suited with a weapon measuring about 1% — 
2. or a trifle more. Again, the man with the shorter 
neck would hardly require a bend of 3% inches at 
the heel of the butt. These measurements seem all 
the more excessive when one remembers that the 
guns of that day were of great length in barrel- 
something like 3 feet, and occasionally 3 feet 6 
inches. Every one knows that the tendency of exces- 
sive bend is to depress the muzzle, which fault would 
be all the more aggravated by the weight and length 
of the barrel. Many of the old guns made a hundred 
or a hundred and fifty years ago, examples of which 
are still to be met with, were very badly balanced, 
quite apart from their clumsiness. Balance, as we 
now understand it, was, in fact, an almost impossible 
thing with a gun whose barrel was of such a length 
and thickness that its weight was often half as much 
again as the rest of the gun, and the sling which 
was frequently fitted to guns in those days must have 
destroyed the balance of the weapon still more ef- 
fectually. 

Talking of balance, it may be interesting to quote 
what the writer has to say on this subject, and on 
the matter of "fit." "Balance the gun," says he, "upon 
the fore finger of your left hand (which is a proper 
situation for your left hand) then join your right 
hand with your fore finger, and throwing it off a lit- 
tle space from you in a horizontal direction, to pre- 
vent it rubbing against your shoulder. In taking up 
the gun, slip your finger off the cock, and draw the 
butt to your shoulder, so as to feel it gently, and 
point the muzzle to any object, without any con- 
straint, it then lies very well to suit you."' It is 
fairly evident from the foregoing remarks that the 
writer, if when he says "balance your gun," he really 
means it, expected the left hand to be pushed for- 
ward until it was so far advanced as to take up 
sufficient of the weight of the barrel to balance the 
gun. This mode of procedure is a way out of a diffi- 
culty in the case of an ill-balanced weapon, but it is 
not at all in accordance with present day improved 
ideas of gun balance, and must have thrown a very 
severe strain upon the arm of the shooter during a 
long day's sport. Otherwise, the directions here given 
are useful enough, and much the same as we should 
recommend to-day to the would-be gunner anxious to 
know whether the gun he proposed purchasing fitted 
him or not. 

At this point in his article the writer goes into an 
elaborate and somewhat abstruse dissertation upon 
triggers and trigger-guards, which, according to his 
way of thinking, were not usually constructed in the 
most convenient fashion. He is speaking, of course, 
of the straight trigger, such as one finds in most 
guns of the period, and his chief objection to the way 
in which it was fitted appears to be that its angle 
caused one's finger to slip up close to the stock, and 
so make the pull very hard. He therefore advocates 



the setting back of the end of the trigger nearer to 
the guard, as well as greater length of trigger, in 
order that the finger might obtain greater leverage 
and be able to regulate the pull to a nicety. Our 
author was evidently a man of thought and observ- 
ance, but he failed to see what gunmakers have 
discovered since, viz: that the curved trigger would 
obviate the chance of the finger slipping in the act 
of pulling. Nowadays, too, triggers are arranged to 
pull off at a resistance of so many pounds, and can 
be regulated so as to suit the peculiarities of any 
individual — an obvious advantage in the case of ex- 
citable or nervous persons. 

There now follows what is, perhaps, the most 
curious of all the remarks contained in this old 
writer's dissertation upon shooting matters. Talking 
of accidents, he says: "We cannot be too minute in 
giving directions which may prevent any accidents 
attending this sport, and on that account cannot cau- 
tion gentlemen too much against a fondness for 
short guns. If short guns go off by accident while 
loading they (i. e., the gentlemen aforesaid) are the 
more exposed to danger, as they more naturally lean 
over the muzzle, which, however, ought to be avoided 
either in long or short guns. We have had an in- 
stance of a gentleman, who, being out a-shooting by 
himself, had his skull laid bare by his gun going 
off, though he knew of no defect in the lock till 
it was afterward examined. He had, no doubt, leaned 
over his gun, and many other like cases might 
prove that no person is so much exposed to accidents 
of this kind from long guns as short ones." One 
would hardly have thought that it were necessary to 
warn sportsmen against the danger of looking down 
their gun barrels in the act of charging a muzzle- 
loader, but no doubt that strange section of hu- 
manity which so often figures nowadays in reports 




of shooting accidents was not unknown in the days 
of our forebears. Muzzleloads are very rarely used 
nowadays, and so accidents of the kind referred to 
by our old-time writer are not common; but we have 
quite as many, and probably more, of that irre- 
sponsible class of human idiots that, having shot 
some one, tries to save its face by remarking that 
it "didn't know it was loaded." 

The following description of what was considered 
in the year 1792 a really good gun is given in this 
interesting article: "First, the barrel should be a 
tolerable large bore, and very smooth, with a hand- 
some outside; the length from 3 feet 6 inches; the 
lock rather small, with good and strong springs; the 
stock neat, not too much burnt (?) in the butt; and 
upon the whole the piece to rise light and handy 
to the shoulder. The mounting may be according to 
fancy; however, brass, for weather convenience, is 
certainly preferable to steel. As for the intrinsic 
value of a piece, that can only be known by trial, 
without which no new one should be purchased." 

Then follows an elaborate and, as we should con- 
sider, a somewhat severe test for proving the capabili- 
ties of the "fowling piece." Our author says: "For 
the purpose of trial, we would advise a young sports- 
man to stand at a distance of 70 yards from a clear 
barn door or any such place, so that the degree of 
scattering the shot will be better observed. At his 
first charge let him try the common charge of a 
piece of powder, and a pipe and a half of shot; and 
to do the gun justice, let him be as steady as pos- 
sible in his aim. If you find that you have thrown 
any at this distance into the card, you may safely 
conclude the piece is a good one; if you have missed 
the card, perhaps through unsteadiness, and thrown 
a tolerable sprinkling into the sheet, you may have 
the same good opinion of the gun; but if you find 
none in the sheet and are sensible of having shot 
steady try then an equal quantity of powder and 
shot (which some barrels are found to carry best) 
at the same distance, and if you then miss giving the 



sheet a tolerable sprinkling, refuse the piece as being 
but an indifferent one, if you are determined to have 
one of the best sort, which certainly is most ad- 
visable; and this trial may be considered altogether 
sufficient for a gun that is recommended by any 
gunsmith as a first-rate one." It is a pity that no 
statement is made as to the size of the "card" re- 
ferred to in these instructions for gun-testing, but we 
may note that this rough-and-ready method of "plat- 
ing" a gun was universally adopted until quite re- 
cently, and doubtless is still practiced in some out- 
of-the-way places, for one can hardly find a barn 
door in any part of the country which has not been 
peppered with shot pellets at one time or another. 

Inferior guns were not expected to stand so search- 
ing a test as the foregoing, although the ordeal 
through which they were supposed to go was severe 
enough to please the most fastidious. The advice 
given is as follows: "For the second, or more in- 
different sort (of a gun) let 55 or 60 yards be the 
distance of trial, and a judgment formed according 
to the above rule; but it must be observed that as 
some pieces carry a larger quantity of powder and 
shot than others, so it will be advisable to try three 
or four different quantities; but never to exceed a 
pipe and a half of powder, and the proportionable 
quantity of shot as before mentioned." What de- 
lightfully haphazard methods our forefathers adopt- 
ed. And yet, who shall say, taking all the disad- 
vantages of those days into consideration, that they 
were any worse shots than ourselves, with all our 
smokeless powders and generally improved ammuni- 
tion, our ejectors and our single triggers? — East Sus- 
sex in Shooting Times. 

o 

A PRACTICAL FLY-BOOK. 



Mr. Carlos G. Young, prominent local angler and 
ex-president of the San Francisco Fly-Casting Club, 
has patented recently a fly-book that for conveni- 
ence, simplicity of arrangement and general utility 
is bound to meet with the approbation of the ang- 
ling fraternity. In another column on this page is 
given a cut of the "Mansfield" fiy-book, open and 
showing the pockets. The book can be carried 
handily in a pocket, opens in a way that an angler 
will understand and appreciate, and carries ]>ockets 
to hold twelve dozen flies and also a separate 
leather and water-proof compartment pocket for 
leaders. The fly-book is neatly and strongly made 
of calf skin and will last a lifetime. This most ex- 
cellent fly-book has been named the "Mansfield" in 
honor of that skillful angler and most congenial 
sportsman. These books are on sale at J. W. Brit- 
tain Company, Van Ness avenue and Turk street; 
Golcher Bros., 513 Market street, and the Palace 
Hardware Company, 63S Market street, San Fran- 
cisco. o 

TRADE NOTES. 



Averages Reported. 

At Massillon, Ohio, recently R. Taylor won first 
general average, 150 out of 160, shooting "New E. 
C." (Improved). C. O. LeCompte won second gen- 
eral average, 149 out of 160, shooting "Infallible." 
L. R. Reid won third general average, 148 out of 
160, shooting "New E. C." ( Improved ». Ralph Po- 
cock won first amateur average, 143 out of 160, shoot- 
ing "New E. C." (Improved). C. J. Schlitz won sec- 
ond amateur average, 135 out of 160, shooting "Du 
Pont." Frank C. Becker won third amateur average, 
128 out of 160, shooting "New E. C." (Improved). 



U. M. C. Record for 1906. 

National Yearly Average, championship of 1906, 
won by W. H. Heer and U. M. C. Shells. He scored 
96.3 per cent of the 14,055 targets shot at during the 
year. This is the greatest honor in the trap shoot- 
ing world as well as the severest test which can 
be applied to shot shells. U. M. C. quality, there- 
fore, stands to-day supreme, for it is the highest 
year's percentage ever made by any shooter as 
proven by "Sporting Life's Annual Trapshooting Re- 
view. Mr. Heer's U. M. C. shells are always uni- 
form in velocity, pattern and penetration, thus enab- 
ling this wonderful shot to go through a whole year 
with less than four targets missed out of every 
hundred shot at. 

Two of the four highest amateurs used U. M. C. 
shells exclusively. Harry Taylor scored 93.8 per 
cent out of 9,950 targets, and O. N. Ford scored 
93.3 per cent out of 13,770 targets. 

This present brilliant showing for U. M. C. shells 
during 1906 is backed by many past records, among 
which may be mentioned the winning of ten out of 
seventeen Grand American Handicaps — a bigger per- 
centage of winnings than those of any gun, shell 
or powder concern — shot II. M. C. shells at the Chi- 
cago Grand American Handicap. The Union Metallic 
Cartridge Company, Bridgeport, Conn. (From 
Sporting Life, Philadelphia.) 

The Open Amateur Championship and the Dick- 
erson Trophy, valued at $300, were won at the New 
York Athletic Club by William M. Foord of Wilming- 
ton, Del., score 94 out of 100 and 23 out of 25 on 
shoot-off, with U. M. C. shells, John Martin winning 
third prize trophy with "Amateur's Choice" U. M. 
C. shells. 

First three professional vaerages were won with 
IT. M. C. shells — S. Glover 96 per cent, H. Welles 
94 per cent, W. ri. Heer 93 per cent. Considerably 
more U. M C. shells were shot than all other makes 
put together in this shoot. As usual, the amateurs 
(those who are influenced by quality only) chose 
U. M. C. shells. 

Pacific Coast sales office, 925 Golden Gate Avenue, 
San Francisco, Cal. H. Justins, Pacific Coast Sales 
Manager. 



Saturday, January 12, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



| THE FARM f 

♦'I ' > i > 4> < t > » | « » ! ■ i| i < l > iff j> > t > > l >l»l > i | i i|u| i i fr i | i ■ ! « 
GOOD MANAGEMENT. 



A professor in dairying at one of the 
New York experiment stations visited 
a large number of farms in the neigh- 
borhood. He took notice in particular 
of one of the farms on which there 
were thirty head of cattle, and asked 
the owner if he would have any ob- 
jection to allow a man to come and 
take samples. The farmer agreed and 
for one year an exact record of the 
feed and of the milk was kept. At 
the end of the year it was found that 
the cattle had consumed $28.50 worth 
of feed and produced $25 worth of 
milk. The farmer had lost $3.50 on 
each cow in his herd, or something 
like $100. In other words, he was not 
even getting full market price for all 
the feed he was giving his cattle. In 
return for all his work he had received 
rather low price for his feed and had 
a large amount of manure, but had 
not really received any pay for his 
work. An interesting sequel to this 
incident is related: The same herd 
was bought by the experiment station 
and fed under the control of the man- 
agement. At the end of the next 
year it was found that the cows had 
eaten $28 worth of feed and had pro- 
duced each about $38 worth of milk. 
A result which shows there is much 
in good management and a study of 
the feed market. 

Later the French government took 
up the matter of breeding or creating 
a heavy road horse. They too resorted 
to English Thoroughbred sires and 
crossing them on native mares hon- 
estly called them Demi Sangs, liter- 
ally meaning half-bloods. But the 
foundation dams were of a finer type 
than the Germans had used owing to 
those originally blacks having drifted 
south in France and mixed with the 
Moorish horses coming across from 
Africa; the latter descending from 
the oldest established breed of horses 
in the world, the Arabian. The Eng- 
lish Thoroughbreds having come orig- 
inally from the Arabians many gener- 
ations before, these Demi Sangs or 
now imported as French Coachers 
drank in the Arabian blood from both 
dam and sire and also had a line from 
the big blacks formerly in Germany, 
Belgium, Normandy, Flanders and 
Holland. The French claim also to 
have rebeautified their Coachers by 
reinfusions in later years of Arabian 
blood. Hense, being of the most re- 
cent origin of these three breeds and 
from violent outcrossing the French 
Coachers have not yet a fixed type so 
capable of reproducing or stamping 
themselves as the older breeds have. 
Technically they are not very prepot- 
ent. If not interbred they require 
crossing on dams of finer mold or as 
the Englishman expresses it, "a dam 
with a bit o' blood" or the product 
shows coarse and loses the roadster 
question. — Neb. Farmer. 



ORIGIN OF THE COACH HORSE. 



There are four breeds proper, as 
each has a registry, of coach or carri- 
age, or large size road horses. In the 
order of their establishments or breed- 
ing up they are the Cleveland Bay, the 
German Coach and the American trot- 
ter of Coacher size. 

The Cleveland Bays were originat- 
ed in England. The desire for a larger 
road horse than the Hackney led the 
English to select from among their 
Thoroughbreds or running horses the 
largest and very wisely, by selecting 
at all times only bays with a star, and 
no other markings, they built up a 
breed that could reproduce uninformly 
the most beautiful color of any breed 
of horses yet originated. They were 
uniformly, too, always rangy. They 
are showy, easily mated and of a 
proud, obliging disposition. Coming 
by selection mainly from the Through- 
bred, they were necessarily of light, 
conformation in body, bone and muscle 
When taken from their native maca- 
damized roads and put to use on dirt 
roads they necessarily proved unable 
to pull the weight of heavy carriages 
and were termed too light waisted, and 
became generally unpopular, especi- 
ally when farmers required them to 
perform general farm labor also. 

Then in Germany there was origin- 



ally, generally over the empire and 
northern France a large, lubberly, 
black breed of horse generations ago. 
The Germans longed for a more appro- 
priate coach or carriage puller, and 
they resorted to selections and impor- 
tations of the English Hunter branch 
of the Thoroughbred. This English 
breed has more bone and muscle than 
the Thoroughbreds selected to found 
the Cleveland Bays. From many gen- 
erations of selections and crossings 
and reinfusions of this Hunter blood 
there came the Oldenburg and Han- 
overian Coach breed now imported to 
America as German Coach horses. 

Get rid of grade sires of all kinds. 
They are holding back the develop- 
ment of the live stock industry more 
than any other one element. Breeding 
to grades is very uncertain, for, being 
of mixed lineage, the offspring may 
show characteristics of any one of a 
number of widely differing ancesters. 
This tends to uncertain types, and 
ui ■Aimuoimn jo 5|ob[ p.iaq atn sf»|iuu 
pure-breds there is a concentration of 
the blood of animals of like charac- 
ters, which will be transmitted to the 
offspring, giving uniformity and cer- 
tainty to breeding work. Castrate 
grade stallions, bulls and other sires 
at once. The gelding and stags thus 
produced will sell fairly well and pure- 
bred sires can be bought at reasonable 
prices. The sire is half the herd in 
breeding work and no other way of 
improving is so cheap as the using 
of good, pure-bred sires. 

o 1 

BE REGULAR. 



Cows are creatures of habit to a sur- 
prising degree, and as a rule, the more 
methodical we are in our treatment 
of them the better will they respond. 
In fact, we believe a good dairy cow 
will always respond to any extra care 
or attention that may be given her, 
in almost any way that will add to 
make a direct return in dollars and 
cents for all such extra care. Regu- 
larity in milkings an essential that 
must be observed if the best results 
are to be secured. Each milker 
should have his or her own coVs. to 
milk and always milk them in regular 
order as far as possible. 

Of equal and perhaps even greater 
importance is regularity in feeding. 
Always feed at the same hour each 
time. Something tells a cow just when 
to expect her feed, almost to the 
minute, and any disappointment causes 
unrest and annoyance to a very no- 
ticable extent in many animals. 

o 

NERVOUS COWS. 



If you have a nervous cow that holds 
up her milk, or does so from any other 
cause, feed her while milking her. 
This quiets her and she lets down 
freely. It is very little, if any more 
other time, and by so doing you get 
the worth of your cow. 

o — 

The cheapest way to feed is to feed 
well from the beginning and never 
allow the animal to get a set back. 
A set back means that the animal will 
not get back to its former condition 
without the consumption of much 
feed. 



The farmers' standard of living is 
rising higher and higher. He sends 
the common things of his farm to the 



cities to become luxuries. He is be- 
coming a traveler; and he has his 
telephone and his daily mail and his 
newspaper. His life is healthful to 
body and sane to mind, and the 
noise and the fever of the city have 
not become the craving of his nerves, 
nor his ideal of the every-day pleas- 
ures of life. A new dignity has come 
to agriculture, along with its econom- 
ic strength; and the farmer has a 
new horizen far back of that of his 
prairie and his mountains, which is 
more promising than the sky-line of 
the city. — Secretary Jas. Wilson. 



Pure water for live stock is a good 
insurance against disease. Surface 
water oftens contains germs, unseen 
by the naked eye, which cause dis- 
ease. Spring water and artesian wa- 
ter are pure and healthful. Well 
water is good — if it is good. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gomhault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 
As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., it is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to give satisfaction. Price $1,50 
per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent by 'ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for 
its use. CW"Send for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 0, 




POULTRY SUPPLIES 
STOCK FOODS 
BEE SUPPLIES 



Catalotues 




141 Spear* St. San Francisco 



PETER SAXE & SON. 513 32d street, 
Oakland. Cal., Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers for past thirty years. All varie- 
ties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence R«v 
licited. 

JERSEYS. HOL.STEINS AND DUR- 
IIAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs, 
Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Niles 
& Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"BAG LI/HIT"' 

HAND LOADED SHELLS 

Our own make, and we're proud of them. 

I land-loaded by our own experts. 

All the leading brands of powder used. 

If you want to strike the "bag limit" use our "liag Limit" Hand 
loaded Shells. 

BRITTAIN & CO. Inc. 

Everything in Hardware 

Van Ness Ave. and Turk St. 



A Guide to Horse Boot 
Buying— Free 



The latest and greatest improve- 
ments in norse Boots — the re- 
sult of two years' planning, as- 
sisted by the advice and ideas 
of the master reinsmen of the 
country — will be found in our 
new catalogue. It shows more 
new patterns and improvements 
than any catalogue ever pub- 
lished. We are making the only 
absolutely new and up-to-date 
line of horse boots on the mar- 
ket this year. Old styles and 
finish left far behind. Don't buy 
a dollar's worth until you see 
our new book. It's free. Write 
to-day. 




NOTICE THE SHAPE 

THE NEW "SELL" 

WIDE HEEL 
QUARTER BOOT 

An improvement in construction 
that you have waited for a long 
time — originated and perfected 
by us. This boot follows the 
natural lines of the hoof, fits 
closely and comfortably, and 
positively will not rub, pinch, 
chafe, bruise or injure the quar- 
ters or heels in any way. Our 
improved method of pressing 
makes the shape permanent, and 
it will outwear any other quar- 
ter boot on the market. Beware 
of imitations of this boot. 

EXAMINE THE CUT 

and consider the following points: 

AT A A the curves are made 
correctly, permitting the 
straps to be drawn tightly 
without pinching or chafing 
the quarters. 

AT B B the curves prevent all 
danger of bruising the heels. 

AT C we have cut away part of 
the boot to show our Improv- 
ed Metal Gore Support. It 
holds the boot in position and 
prevents the stitching from 
ripping at the gore, and posi- 
tively will not injure the 
horse's heels. 




0URNEWWAY 
OFSEWING 
TNT STRAPS 
ON THE WRAP 
PERS TO PRE- 
VENT CHAFING 



ANOTHER IMPROVEMENT 

See how the straps are sewed 
to the wrapper of the leg boots. 
All straps are sewed to a sep- 
arate piece of leather which is" 
securely stitched to the wrapper. 
This prevents chafing and the 
straps will not pull off. Es- 
pecially goo.t for boots with 
kersey wrappers. 

SELL BRAND 

Boots (formerly known as the 
Ciilliam) are now carried In 
stock by the leading dealers in 
the West. For free catalogue 
address 

THE SELL HORSE GOODS CO. 
CANTON, OHIO. 



1 1 



T HE B RBBDBB AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 12, 1907 



THE CONEY ISLAND 
JOCKEY CLUB 

Race Course: Sheepshead Bay, 
Now York. Office: Windsor 
Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave., 
New York. 

THE CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY 
...CLUB STAKES... 

$25,000 
For the June Meeting, 1907 
To Close 

Tuesday. January 15, 1907 

For THRICE YEARS OLD— By sub- 
scription of $25 each, to accompany 
the nomination; $250 additional to 
start. Guaranteed Cash Value $25,000. 
of which $3000 to the second and 
$2000 to the third. Should the winner 
of this stake also win The Tidal and 
The Lawrence Realization Stakes. The 
Coney Island Jockey Club will give an 
additional $10,000 to such horse win- 
ning the three events. Weights: Colts 
126 lbs.. Geldings 123 lbs., Fillies 121 
lbs.; winners of three races exclusively 
for three years old of the value of 
$5000 each, or of one of the value of 
$15,000, to carry 3 lbs. extra. Non- 
winners of a race exclusively for three 
years old of the value of $5000 allowed 
7 lbs.; of $3000 allowed 10 lbs. ONE 
MILE AND A HALF. 

Entries to be addressed to the Clerk 
of the Course. 

The Coney Island Jockey Club 
Windsor Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave. 
NEW YORK. 



RACING! 



New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Racetrack 



Six or more races each week day, rain 
or shine. 



Opening' Saturday, November 17. 

Races commence at 1:40 P. M.. sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12 o'clock, thereafter 
every twenty minutes until 1:40 P. It. 
No smoking in last two cars, which are 
reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after 
fifth ami last races. 




THOS. H. WILLIAMS. President. 
FEBCY W. TREAT. Secretary. 



^IJSORBINE 



will reduce inflamed. tnvnllen Joints- 
Bruises, Soft Hunches, Cure Boils. 
Fistula, or any unhealthy sore quick- 
ly; pleasant to use: does not 
blister uuder bandage or remove 
the hair, and you can work the 
borse. 82.00 per bottle, express 
prepaid. Book 7-C free. 
ABSORBING, JR., for mankind, 
'^jjS'- (| per bottle. Cures Varicose 
jZ/VelllBi Varicocele Hydroce't. 
strains, Bruises, stops Pain and Inflammation 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 
54 Monmouth Street Springfield, Mass 

For Sale by — 

I^angley Michaels, San Francisco. 
Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.", F. W. Union Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Western Wholesale Drug Co., Los 
Affgeles, Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sac- 
ramento, Cal.; l'acitic Drug Co., beattle, 
Wash.; Spokane Drug Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers In PAPER. 
No. 403 Twelfth St., Oakland 
Blake. Moffit & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall & Co., Portland. Oregon. 



SOME GOOD ONES FOB SALE. 

RAMONA S., bright bay 'filly, four 
years old, 15% hands, weighs about 
1050 pounds. By Zombro, dam Auntie 
l.v Anli-vnlo; second dam by Major 
Turtlelock. Sound, handsome, gentle, 
and has trotted miles in 2:17%. A good 
racing prospect; goes without boots; 
stylish roadster. 

SURREY HORSE, sorrel, five years 
old, 16.1 hands, weighs 1200 pounds, 
good high-headed, stylish surrey horse. 
Sound, gentle and pleasant driver; 
afriad of nothing. 

ANITA, brown mare, six years old, 
15.1 hands, weighs about 1050 pounds. 
By Terric by Guy Wilkes, dam by Ante- 
volo. This mare is in foal to Prince 
Ansel and nominated in the Breeders' 
Futurity Stake, $7000 guaranteed. She 
is sound and gentle and anyone can 
drive her. 

The above stock will be sold reason- 
able. For further particulars address 

E. A. SWABT, Dixon, Cal. 

MARE WANTED. 

By McKinney. Zombro. Kinney Lou. 
Greco, Searchlight or Nutwood Wilkes, 
not to exceed seven years old. brown, 
bay or black; sound, good size and 
handsome; trotter with or without rec- 
ord; standard and registered. Answer 
giving full particulars and lowest cash 
price. 

p. w. kellEy. 

Breeder and Sportsman, 616 Golden 
Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

KINNEY LOU COLT FOR SALE. 

Foaled 1905. Dam by Boodle 2:12%, 
2nd dam by Antevolo 7648, 3rd dam by 
Altamont 3600. For price and further par- 
ticulars call on 

(i. B. Blanchard, San Jose, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

ALIX B. bay mare (record 2:24%) by 
Nutwood Wilkes (2:16%) and out of 
Alberta (by Albert W. 2:20). 

CARLTON W. GREENE, 
873 Eddy Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION FOR 
SALE. 

I have six thoroughbred stallions for 
sale at prices to suit purchasers of 
limited means. No breeder of harness 
horses can afford to go without a thor- 
oughbred horse on his farm for a brood- 
mare sire for getting fine mares for 
dams of high class roadsters. Address 
CAFT. T. B. MERRY, 

549 Grand Ave, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

The well known stallion Milbrae 
2:16% and his two brothers, Portola 
and Menlo Boy. Milbrae is a handsome 
seal brown. 16 hands high and weighs 
1,190 lbs., a horse of excellent disposi- 
tion, splendid conformation and pos- 
sessed of great power and beauty. Mil- 
brae is sired by Prince Airlie, he by 
Guy Wilkes 2:1514, great grand sire 
Geo. Wiles 2:22, first dam Fearless by 
Fallis 2:23, second dam Jean Perault 
by Signal. For further information ap- 
ply to P. H. McEvoy, Menlo Park, Cal. 



BUZZ SAW 43455 FOR SALE. 



BUZZ SAW 13455 Is a handsome, jet 
black colt, foaled April 10th, 1904. Solid 
color, 15 hands, and weighed 950 pounds 
December 10th, as a two-year-old. He 
is perfectly sound, and while just broken 
to drive is a remarkably pure-gaited trot- 
ter, with a snappy quick action and fine 
style. Buzz Saw is by Strathway 13214, 
first dam Idleweiss by Gen. Logan 17604; 
second dam Hazel by Capoul 1037; third 
dam by Romulus; fourth dam by Simp- 
son's Black Bird. He is entered In the 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes ($7000) 
and the Occident Stake. A great pros- 
pect for anyone wanting a good colt. 
Would not sell him. but am going out 
of the horse business. For further par- 
ticulars address 

R. G. WHITE, Hanford, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 



Bay mare Castella, dam Daisy (dam 
of Walter P. 2:24%). Castella has two 
colts, both show lots of speed, but 
neither has been trained. She Is a fine 
sad. lie mare. Can single-foot very fast; 
weighs MO pounds. Price $75. For 
er particulars address HOWARD 
KERR, 623 J. Street, Sacramento, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Effie Madison, 16 hands high, sound, 
can trot miles in 2:40, has good action, 
seven years old, a high-class mart. 
Sired by James Madison, first dam 
Lady W. by Ophir. 

Also her two-year-old bay filly by 
Stam I!., large sized filly and a good 
prospect. Entered and paid up on in 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes No. 
5. $7.imn guaranteed. Address Wm. E. 
DETELS, Pleasanton, Cal. 

AGENTS AND COKKKSI'ONDKNTS 
WANTED EVERYWHERE FOR 
"BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN." 



WANTED — TO LEASE. 

A well tired McKinney stallion. Fifty 
per cent of net earnings to the owner. 
First class care taken of horse; can 
give best of references. Good field for 
well bred stallion. Address 
M. E. LEWIS, 
136 4th St., Eureka, Cal. 

IMPORTED HACKNEY STALLIONS 

At one-half other people's prices. If 
you want bargains write at once to 

R. P. STERICKER, West Orange, N. J. 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD— 77 premiums. California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co . San 
Male... 

CONCORD RACE TRACK 

Concord, Contra Costa County, Cal. 

Having leased the above track we 
have made arrangements to break and 
develop trotters and pacers. We have 86 
box stalls and will guarantee to keep 
ibis track in perfect order. The climate 
is unsurpassed. Owners and trainers are 
cordially invited to visit this course. 
As a winter track Concord is second to 
no other in California. Terms very rea- 
sonable. F. M. HAMMETT and J. E. 
FOSTER, Lessees. 

RIVERSIDE TRACK FOR SALE. 

The half-mile race track at Riverside 
(the best footing of any track in the 
State), lots of good, pure artesian 
water, fine grandstand, 45 good stalls, 
big hay barn, everything in the best of 
condition. Excellent pasturage in cen- 
ter field. Climate absolutely the best 
for winter and summer quarters in Cali- 
fornia. All horsemen agree that it is 
the best training track in the State, as 
no horse ever went lame on the River- 
side track. It is centrally located, about 
10 minutes' drive from the business cen- 
ter of the town. An ideal place for any 
trainer with some capital, as Riverside 
is one of the best cities in Southern Cal- 
ifornia for horse racing. This is always 
proven by the large attendance at every 
meeting given in this prosperous place. 
For price and particulars address EU- 
GENE F. BINDER, Owner, 127 Vine St., 
Riverside, Cal. 

VETERINARY DENTISTRY 

Ira Barker Dalziel, formerly of 605 Golden 
Gate Ave., is now permanently located at 

620 Octavia St., San Francisco 

Between Fulton and Grove Sts. 
ly-ery facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. 

Complicated cases treated successfully. 
Calls from out of town promptly respon- 
ded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
620 Octavia St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Special 2074 

Fred Mast Successor to Zlbbell & Son 

THE AVENUE STABLE. 
672-680 11th Ave., one block north of 
Chutes. 

A nice line of New Livery; Large, 
Clean Box Stalls. Special attention paid 
to boarding high-class horses. Work 
horses for any business for hire at all 
times. All kinds of country horses for 
sale. 



J. R. Wilson. 

WILSON 



A. F. Rooker 

ROOKER 



Livery, Board and Feed Stable 

All kinds of team work on short no- 
tice. Contractors for Grading and Ex- 
cavating. 410 Franklin St., cor. Grove. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Pointers and 

English Setters 

Trained and Broken 

Broken Dogs and Well Bred Puppies 
for sale. Address E. VALENCIA 

212 North Brown St., Napa, Cal. 

ENGLISH SETTERS 
Trained and Broken 

Well Bred Broken Dogs for 
Sale 

Address Wm. Phillips 

Benicia 



BULL TERRIERS. — Pure white, high 
class puppies for sale, sired by Wood- 
lawn Baron, a Classy individual and 
show winner, brother to the winner of 
first anil specials at Bull Terrier Breed- 
ers' Show at Philadelphia (at which the 
best in the world were shown). STIL- 
ETTO KENNELS, 225 Alcatraz Avenue, 
Berkeley, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 
TBI-fOLCR COLLIE FUFS from 

working stock, Sire Shadeland Random, 
Sir Jan. A. K. C. lOO.Siifi (son of Imp. 
Inverness Prince). RANDOM COLLIE 
KENNELS, E. C. Rrand, Prop., Box 116, 
Santa Rosa, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
161 Montgomery St., Cor. Sutter. 

Has declared a dividend for the term 
ending December SI, 190C. at the rate 
of three and one-half (3%) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
and payable on and after January 2, 
added to and bear the same rate of in- 
terest as principal. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Cashier. 



Dividend Notice. 



California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 
Cor. California and Montgomery 
Streets 

For the six months ending December 
31, 1906, dividends have been declared 
on the deposits in the savings depart- 
ment of this company as follows: On 
term deposits at the rate of three and 
six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per annum, 
and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 
three and one-half (3%) per cent per 
annum, free of taxes, and payable on 
and after Wednesday, January 2, 1907. 
The same rate of interest will be paid 
by our branch offices, located at 1 1>3 1 
Devisadero St., 927 Valencia St. and 
1740 Fillmore St. 

J. DALZIEL, BROWN. Mgr. 



PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY 

High Class Art 
— in — 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 



There is only one 
RUBBEROID ROOFING 
Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 
WE SELL IT. 
BONESTELL, RICHARDSON & CO., 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WEBS TER'S 

INTERNATIONAL 




NEEDED in every HOME, 
SCHOOL and OFFICE. 

Reliable, Useful, Attractive, Lasting, Up 
to Date and Authoritative. 2380 Pages, 
5000 Illustrations. Recently added 25,000 
New Words, New Gazetteer and New Bio- 
graphical Dictionary. Editor W. T. Harris, 
Ph.D., I.I.l), United States Com. of Ed'n. 
Highest Awards at St. Louis and Portland. 



WobsterB Collegiate Dictionary, largest of 
our aliridgmrnts. Regular and Tliin Paper 
editions. Unsurpassed for elegance and con- 
venience. 1110 pages am) 1(00 illustration*. 



Write for "The Story of a Book"— Free. 
G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Springfield, Mass. 
GET THK BEST. 



|Jtt« El\0\I0lV| 

and *ust as they want it. The right way to 
salt animals is to let them help themselves. 

Compressed 

Pure-Salt Bricks 

! inourPmtent Feeder*, iiipplrreflned dairy twit. I 
They mean animal thrift. They cost but little. 

Convenient for you and your I 
animals suffer no Dejrlect. Awk. I 
your dealer and write n3 for | 
booklet. 
Belmont 
Stable 
Supply Co. I 
»• • v ••- 



i 



CAPSULES 



\ 



i 



Saturday, January 12, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



...THE NEW... 



SB DU PONT SMOKELESS $> 



Distinguishes the Veteran Sportsman. 



Its regularity has won the confidence of the men who know 
how to shoot and what to shoot. 

Has won more high averages, than all other powders combined. 



See That All Your Shells Are Loaded With the New Du Pont Smokeless. 



E. L Du Pont de Nemours Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 




ITHACA GUNS 



THIS illustration shows our No. 7 $300 list gun. It is impossible to 
show by a cut the beautiful finish, workmanship and material of this 
grade of gun, it can only be appreciated after you have handled 
„ and examined the gun for yourself. It is fitted with the best Dam- 
ascus or Whitworth Fluid Steel barrels, the finest figured Walnut stock 
that Nature can produce, is hand checkered and engraved in the most 
elaborate manner with dogs and birds inlaid in gold. Send for Art Cata- 
log describing our complete line, 17 grades, ranging in price from $17.75 
net to $300 list. 



Ithaca Gun Company 

Pacific Coast Branch, 1346 Park St. 



Ithaca, N. 

Alameda, Cal. 



Y. 



GUNS 



FRESH AMMUNITION 




Outing and Rubber Footwear. Good for Wet Weather and Down Town. 

Palace Hardware, 638 Market Street 

Main Store and Office, 458 Ooldcn Gate Ave., San Francisco 

RossMcMahon Awn tnt nd co. 

AT THE OLD STAND 

Teamsters' Rain Goods, Bags, Tents, Awnings, Hammocks, Covers 
73 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



: 

► Formerly of Clabrough, (iolcher & Co. < 

4 

< 

■* 
•« 
•* 
•« 



EGOLCHER BROS. 



I Guns, Fishing Tackle 
Ammunition 
Sporting Goods 




Telephone 



. Temporary .883 51 1 Market St., San Francisco I 

^AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAa 



Quinns Ointment 

Will Make A Horse Over; 



will nut sound lc|»s under him and 
Will save him from the cheap hawker and trader. It is the 
standard cure for Spavins, ('urhs, Splints. WindpiifTs and all 
the various lumps and hunches of like kind. Keep it always on 
hand and you will he prepared when trouble comes. Leading 
horsemen everywhere know it and use ii. 

Mr. rt. H. Clark. Fredonbu ft. Y., writes: "Tho bottle of 
Qulnn's ointmont purchased from yon about t»» years »ko 
remoTfid a curb and thoroughpfii mid did it tor good. My 
horse's lest is as smooth at* ever.'* 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by nil druggist! or sent hy mail' 
Write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. EDDY & COMPANY, WHITEHALL, H. Y. 




For Guns 



"3 In One" Oil Has No Equal 

lor oiling triggc i , lock, every action part. DoM 
not dry out quickly like heavier oils, gum. harden 
or collect dust no matter how Ion* gun standi. 

3 in One" cleans out the residue ol burnt powder 
(black or smokeless) after shootinK, IcavinK the 
barrel clean and shiny. It actually penetrate* 
the pores ol the metal, forming a delicate per 
mancnt protecting coat that is absolutely 
impervious to water or weather. No acid. 
C„« A test will tell. Write (or sample 
rrCC n0 „| e . ft w. COLE COMPANY. 
l2/> Washington Lilc Bldg., New York. N.Y. 



i 



Standing Offer 

Good always, everywhere. 
$100 Reward, for any lame- 
ness, cuth, splint, founder, 
distemper, etc., (where euro 
is possible) that is not cured by 




TUTTLE'S 
ELIXIR 

Greatest borse remedy in the world. Tutll«*'» 
Family Elixir invaluable for human bruises, 
pains, rlieuiii.iij.wn. etc. Send for free 100 pairo 
book,**Veterinary Experience." The perfect 
horseman's guide, livery disease symptom and 
its treatment. 

Tuttlc's Elixir Co.. 52 Beverly SI.. Boston. Mass. 

Redinttoo A Co., Third St.. near Towntcnd, San Francisco. 
W. A Shaw, Lqs Anfcles, Calif., Agents. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 12, 1907. 




W 'I* 'I' *i* "I* *i* *J* 



»»»»» -i- » # t » .;. > ■!■ » » » » % ft 3 » % f ft » .••j.*+vi"(.+*++*+*+++^<n. 



THE REMINGTON AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 




Is the Gun for the Duck and Quail Shooter 

No recoil means increased pleasure; the solid breech means absolute safety; the single barrel means case in handling. You can afford this modem gun 
because it lists at the moderate price of $40, subject to dealers' discount. Remington Arms Co., Ilion, New York 

The Fdmou 

U itl C ^ aS rt ' s l H,ns '''^' f° r winnings made at the Western Handicaps held at Denver and Los Angeles, and also for the 

" fine bags that are made by duck and quail shooters. 

Shotgun Ammunition 

The Union Metallic Cartridge Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut 

H. Justins, Pacific Coast Sales Manager - Sales Office, 925 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

INCHES T E R= 



Model 1907 Self-Loading Rifle. 



351 Caliber High Power. 




"The Gun That Shoots Through Steel" 



Standard Rifle, 20-inch round nickel steel barrel, pistol grip, stock of plain walnut, not checked, weight about 7?4 pounds, number of shots, six, LIST Price, $28.00 

This new rifle, which has the thoroughly tried and satisfactory Winchester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge powerful enough for the largest game. The 
soft point bullet mushrooms splendidly on animal tissue, tearing a wide, killing path. With a metal patched bullet this ride will shoot through a 14-inch steel 
plate. The Model 1907 is a six-shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and simple and strong in construction. It is a serviceable, handy gun from 
butt to muzzle. There are no moving projections on the outside of the gun to catch in the clothing or tear the hands, and no screws or pins to shake loose. It is 
easily loaded and unloaded; easily shot with great rapidity and easily taken down and cleaned. List price, $28.00. The retail price is lower. Ask your dealer to 
show you this gun. Send for circular fully describing this rifle. 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Smith Hammerless and Ejector Guns 



Also Hunter One Trigger 



Won This Year's Grand 

American Handicap 

268 Competitors 

Also Won Grand Eastern 
Handicap 

(Hunter One Trigger) 




SEND ; FOR CATALOGUE 



Hunter Arms Co., - - Fulton, N. Y. 
PHIL. B. BEKEART, CO., Inc. 

Temporary Office: No. 1346 Park St., ALAMEDA, Cal. 
(Pacific Coast Branch.) 
A. J. Reach Co., Ithaca Gun Co., Smith & Wesson, E. C. Cook & Bro., 
Marlin Fire Arms Co., Markham Air Rifle Co., Daisy Mfg. Co., Ideal Mfg. Co., 
Bridgeport Gun Implement Co., Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, Ham- 
ilton Rifle Co. 



There is NO Gun just as 
good as 
THE PARKER. 



The OLD RELIABLE 
PARKER is positively the 
BEST gun in the 
world. 




SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



PARKER BROS. 

N. Y. Salesroom: 32 Warren St. = 30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 

...THESE ARE THE BRANDS OF... 



Selby 



FACTORY 
LOADED 



Shells 



Pacific==Challenge==Superior==Excelsior 

VALLEJ0 JUNCTION, \ • CONTRA COSTA CO., CAL. 



VOLUME XLIX. Xo. 26. 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907. 



Subscription $3.00 a Year. 




2 



1 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 19, 1907. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 year old Stallion of 1°04 
Champion 3 year old Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Record ... .2:12% 
Timed in a Race 2:10 1 2 

WINNER OP HARTFORD FUTURITY ($8500) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% is by Expedition 2:15% (sire of Biflora 2:0914, Ex- 
ton 2:10%, and 50 others in 2:30 list), son of Electioneer 125 and Lady Russell 
(sister to Maud S. 2:08% and dam of 5 in 2:30 list), by Harold 113. The dam of 
Bon Voyage is Bon Mot (dam of Bon Voyage 2:12%, Endow 2:14% and Bequeath 
2:20%), by Erin 2:24%; second dam Farce 2:29%, by Princeps 536; third dam 
Roma (dam of Farce 2:29%, Romance 2:29%, and Guyon 2:27%), by Golddust 50; 
fourth dam Bruna (dam of Woodford Pilot 2:22%), by Pilot Jr. 12. 

Season of 1907 at PLEAS ANTON RACE TRACK. 

where he will be limited to twenty outside mares. 
$5fl for thf> QMenn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded 
•puv iui nil Oiaauil should mare not prove in foal. A rare chance to breed 

good mares to an exceptionally high-class and highly bred young stallion. 



Highland C. 



2:19^ TRIAL 2:12 

(At Four Tears Old) 
Bred at Highland Farm, Dubuque, Iowa 



By EXFRESSO 29199 (half brother to Expressive (3) 2:12%) by Advertiser 
2:15%, son of Electioneer 125; dam ALPHA 2:23*2 (dam of Aegon 2:18%, sire of 
Ageon Star 2:11%, etc.) by Alcantara by George Wilkes 2:22; second dam Jessie 
Pepper (dam of 2 in list and 3 producing sons and 7 producing daughters) by Mam- 

brino Chief 11, etc. 

Terms, $25 For the Season 

HIGHLAND is a grand looking young stallion, eight years old. His breeding 
is most fashionable and his immediate ancestors are producers of race winners with 
fast records. He is beautifully gaited and has a perfect disposition. Does not 
pull or want to break at speed, and can be placed at will in a bunch of horses. He 
is a high-class horse and has better than 2:10 speed, and has trotted a quarter in 
31 seconds over the Pleasanton race track. 

HIGHLAND is a coal black horse with one white hind ankle, stands 16.1 hands 
high and weighs close to 1200 pounds. 

The above Stallions, owned by W. A. Clark Jr., will make a public season. Both 
are entered in the Horse World Stallion Representative Stake for three-year-olds, 
and all their foals will be eligible to this rich event, with nothing to pay until the 
year of the race. 

Address all communications to 

J. O. Gerrety, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 



By J. J. Audubon 
16695, sire of Au- 
dubon Boy \:59'{ 
Nan Audubon 2:08!a 
Miss Rita :n is 



Audubon Boy 1:59 

DAM, FLAXY (dam of Audubon Boy 1:59%, Royal R. Sheldon 2:04%, Red Elm 
2:16% and grandam of Simon Kenton 2:13% and Mary Louise 2:27%), by Bourbon 
Wilkes 2345 (sire of Coastman 2:0S%, Split Silk 2:Q$ 1 A. Sunland Belle 2:08%, etc.), 
he by George Wilkes 2:22, out of Favorite 2:35% (dam of 1 and five sires of 135 
in 2:30), by Abdallah 15. Flaxy's dam was Kit, by Clark Chief 89 (sire of 6 and 
dame of 35); second dam Nelly by Grey Denmark. J. J. Audubon 16695 was by 
Alcyone 2:27, out of Dolly Pomeroy (dam of Miss Pomeroy 2:22% and J. J. Audu- 
bon 1:59%), by Highland Grey 2:28 (sire of 8, including Highland L. 2:14%); 
second dam, Nelly 

First and only horse whose entire racing career (56 heats) averages 2:08>4. 

First and only horse at 5 years to pace twice in one day in 2:03 I 4 , winning race. 

First and only horse to pace in 2:00' 4 , first trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59» 4 , second trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace to the half in 57V a seconds. 

First and only horse to pace to the three-quarter in 1:27^. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59%, first trial second year. 

First and only horse to pace again in 2:00, same week, same year. 

First and only horse to pace twice in 2:00 in one week. 

All of the above without the aid of wind or dust shield and all under unfavor- 
able conditions, the most unfavorable of all being when he paced in 1:59 ' 4 . 

WILL STAND AT AGRICULTURAL PARK. LOS ANGELES, TO 
A FEW GOOD MARES. 
TERMS — S100 for the Season. $150, with return privilege or money refunded as 
I may choose. For further particulars address 

J. Y. GATCOMB, 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 




TALLION OWNER 



If in nood of anything in the line of Stallion Cards compiled and 

printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horso liooks, 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse cuts in stock and made from photos. 
Hoot Tails of all kinds for road or track, Breeding Hobbles, Stallion 
Supports, Pregnators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : : 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO, 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



1 



75_ PER CENT ° f »» »- s n 7S nW! 

USE AND RECOMMEND 

Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy 

— SOLD BY— 

W. A. Sayre Sacramento, Cal. 

R, T. Frazier Pueblo, Calo. 

J. G. Read & Bro Ogden, Utah 

Jubinville & Nance Butte, Mont. 

^ffflL ■ Spokane, Wash. 

A. F. Iloska Harness Co 

yS\ Tacoma, Wash. 

Thos. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

p^TTg^i^J |"|J C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

"SBJSSntM ■ i+n Win. E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

p«a W. C. Topping San Diego, Cal. 

pMm Jepaen Saddlery Co. . .Los Angeles, Cal. 

mf/M 1 Schwi Fresno, Cal. 

,. cA Mp Bf r ^/Km If- Thorn waldson b'resno, Cal. 

Jno. McKerron . . . . San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTigue San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros. Harness Mfg. Co 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs., 412 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 




Promises Fulfilled 

On the promises of surpassing speediness so constantly 
'•made good" in those sired by 

"McKINNEY" 2:11^ 

rests the world wide fame of that superb Horse. Let us 
send you some convincing particulars. 

mc^rih^ou"^ The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



Colt Trotters are Required 

Where futurity winning is the object. 

"AXWORTHY" (3) 2:lS/ 2 

The sire of Alta Axworthy (2) 2,15^, (3) 2,io>4 and 
42 others in 2:30 (only one pacer), excclls in many 
respects which we will be glad to point out. May we? 

iS&S^ffi^I The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N.Y. 



JAMES A. GROVE (R. R. Sayer, Atty.) WILLIAM G. TORLEY 

LAWRENCE STOCK FARM 

HIGH CLASS HORSES BOUGHT AND SOLD. BROOD MARES CARED 
FOR AND BRED ACCORDING TO INSTRUCTIONS 

Futurity Stake Candidates and Candidates for the M. and M. and C. of C. 
Stakes Developed. Patronage and Correspondence Solicited. 

LAWRENCE STOCK FARM, Lawrence, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



AIR CUSHION 

^No Lameness 



They fill with aii at each step. 
That's what breaks concussion. 
That's what prevents slipping. 
That's what keeps the foot 

healthy. 
That's what cures lameness. 



PADS 

NoSllpplng 



; |5EE THAT CUSHION? 

Order through your horse-shoer 

Revere RubberCo. 

SOLE MASUFACTUREi.3 

I Boston. San Francisco 






No Breeder Can Afford 
To be Without It 

— Price Reduced— 

$4 in Cloth $5 in Leather 

To Be Purchased From 
Foster & O' Rear, Ferry Bide. . San Francisco 
From The Author, Capt. T. B. Merry 
549 Grand Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 


The American 
Thoroughbred 


The Result of 50 Years of Close Study 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove anil Baker Sts., just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 

Best located and healthiest stable in San Prancisco. Always a good roadster on hand 
for sale. Careful ami experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare 
horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stable and not have their horses frightened 
by autos or cars. 



San Francisco Riding Club 



ANNEX FOB DRIVING HORSES. 

55 Stalls on Ground Floor; 

5 Exits. Perfect facilities for safety 

and the proper care of Horses. 



OPEN FOB FUBEIC PATRONAGE. 

While this Stable is under the Man- 
agement of San Francisco Riding 
Club, it is not exclusive for the use 
of Members. 



ISSK 



Apply for Further Information to SAN FRANCISCO RIDING CLUB, 
Seventh Avenue and C Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 19, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3: 



THE WEEKLY 

Breeder and Sportsman 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 
OFFICE: 616 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, 
SAN FRANCISCO 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms— One Tear $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



MR. MAGNUS FLAWS, of Chicago, Illinois, pre- 
sents in this issue a very timely suggestion in re- 
gard to a very much needed amendment to the 
rules of registration as now in force. At the meet- 
ing of the stockholders and directors of the Ameri- 
can Trotting Register Association to be held in 
Chicago on the 7th of next month, an effort will be 
made to change the rule which now requires that 
a mare by a standard trotting horse must produce 
two standard performers at that gait before she 
can be registered. Like Mr. Flaws, the writer has 
often found cases where this rule seems absurd. 
For instance, there is the grand young stallion 
Aerolite 2:15% as a two-year-old, winner of last 
year's pacing division of the Pacific Breeders' Fu- 
turity, and the fastest pacer of his age of 1906. 
He is by Searchlight 2:03% a registered horse, but 
cannot be registered until his dam is registered. 
The dam of Aerolite is Trix by Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16% that is standard by breeding, performance 
and everything else, and is regstered. His second 
dam is by Director 2:17, also registered and stand- 
ard under all rules. Now Trix, being by a register- 
ed horse and out of a mare by a registered horse 
and having produced two standard performers should 
be eligible to registration, but is not because her 
produce are pacers. She has produced Mona Wilkes 
2:11% at three years and Aerolite 2:15% at two 
years, and is reckoned one of the greatest young 
broodmares in California, especially as her two- 
year-old and yearling are showing wonderfully fast. 
If both should pace in two minutes and Mona Wilkes 
and Aerolite do the same she could not be registered 
under the present rule. If, however, she had pro- 
duced two foals that just managed with the aid of 
a good day and a good track to take a trotting record 
of 2:30 she would be eligible to registration. The 
absurdity of the rule is even more conspicuous 
when we consider that the produce Of a standard 
trotting stallion and a standard pacing mare is en- 
titled to registration. This being permitted under 
the present rules is an acknowledgement that the 
gaits are kindred and it would harm no one and 
benefit many if an amendment were adopted which 
would permit such mares as Trix to be registered. 
We believe that the rules of registration have been 
wisely drawn and carefully amended in the past 
and that the officials of the Register Association 
have done as they honestly deemed best in regard 
to them and now that such cases as the one referred 
to here has arisen we believe they will see the jus- 
tice of the proposed amendment referred to by 
Mr. Flaws and will adopt it without further delay. 



THE COMMUNICATION from Mr. Benj. M. Cram 
of this city, which appeared in these columns two 
weeks ago, in which he called attention to the fact 
that California had failed to secure representation 
in that new organization, the American Association 
of Trotting Horse Breeders, has called forth a com- 
munication from Mr. H. K. Devereux, secretary of 
the new organization, which appears in this issue. 
Mr. Devereux explains that places have been left 
for this coast to be represented on the board of 
directors of the association, and invites those in- 
terested to submit names of those they would like 
to see appointed as directors. We hope our read- 
ers will comply with this request, selecting names 
of men who will have the energy and the time and 
can afford to attend the meetings of the Board 
and act for the best interests of Pacific Coast trot- 
ting horse breeders. The ne\v organization can ac- 
complish much good in the way of promoting legis- 
lation for and preventing legislation against the 
interests of horse breeders. 



PLANS for the California State Fair, if carried out 
on the lines laid out by the Directors, will be a great 
exposition of the products and wealth of the State. 
The date set for the fair to open is Saturday, Sep- 
tember 7th, and it will close on the following Satur- 
day. During the week the National Irrigation Con- 
gress is to meet in Sacramento, which will bring a 
very large number of prominent persons and land 
owners to the capital city and the Fair Directors de- 
sire to impress upon the farmers, miners, manufac- 
turers, horticulturists, stock breeders and other pro- 
ducers of this State the importance and value of 
making exhibits at the fair this year. President 
Roosevelt, it is stated, will visit the big irrigation 
dam on Salt River, Arizona, about that time, and it 
may be possible to secure his attendance one day 
at our State Fair. The Legislature is to be asked 
•for an appropriation that will permit the removal 
of the pavilion from Capitol Park to the new fair 
grounds, and an additional sum is to be asked for 
ornamentation of the grounds. In discussing the 
project of beautifying the park it was stated that 
the Golden Gate Park Commission would be willing 
to donate ornamental trees for this purpose and Di- 
rectors Kiesel, Wilson and Secretary Filcher were 
appointed a committee to obtain the trees. Director 
F. H. Burke submitted a plan for stakes for two- 
year-olds to start this year, with races for trotters 
and pacers of that age, and to gradually grow into 
a futurity. It is also proposed to offer running stakes 
for California bred two-year-olds, which is a most ex- 
cellent idea and will give the breeders of thorough- 
breds who do not care to race East a chance to 
start their colts. There are to be three of these 
races, one for two-year-old colts and geldings, another 
for fillies, the money winners to meet in a race for 
the charnponship of both sexes. Directors Burke 
and Whittaker were appointed to attend the conven- 
tion at Pleasanton to-day to formulate plans for a 
California circuit. The annual meeting of the State 
Agricultural Society will be held at Sacramento on 
Saturday, February 23d, when the election of officers 
will take place. 



THE MONTANT CIRCUIT. 

At the annual meeting of the Montana Fair and 
Racing Association, held January 3d in the offices 
of J. W. Pace in Helena, it was decided not to give 
out the date fixed for the different fairs of the 
association until they are ratified by the several 
directors of the fair. 

The total amount of $100,000 will be distributed 
to horsemen on the Montana circuit this year, the 
aggregate of stake rr.ces being $40,000, and the total 
of the purse races $60,000, an increase of $25,000 
over last year. Each fair in the associations will 
give at least two $1000 stakes for harness horses. 
Butte, Helena, Anaconda and Missoula will give 
five $1000 stakes, and Great Falls three. Big Timber 
will give $500 stakes in the same classes. 

The early closing stakes will be uniform through- 
out the State and will be announced February 15th, 
and the circuit has been arranged so that the ship- 
ping expenses to horsemen will be considerably 
lighter this year than last. 

The date for the Montana State Fair has been set 
for September 30, ending October 5. Butte will 
have thirty days of racing and on account, of circuit 
arrangements will be concluded by August 19th. 

The cities in the association are Butte, Helena, 
Missoula, Great Falls, Anaconda, Billings, Bozeman, 
Livingston and Big Timber. The officers elected 
for the ensuing year are: President, E. C. Mul- 
roney, Missoula; secretary-treasurer, J. W. Pace, 
Helena; directors, J. W. Seaman, Livingston; A. G. 
Galbraith, Butte; M. Martin, Deer Lodge; R. D. 
Steele, Bozeman, and Allan Pierse, Great Falls. — 
Helena Record. 

o 

The Combination Sale which Fred H. Chase & Co. 
have announced for Monday, February 11th, has al- 
ready received consignments that will make it a 
big drawing card, as some very choice animals have 
been booked for it. Mr. T. J. Crowley sends his 
good mare Lottie Parks 2:16% by Cupid 2:18 (broth- 
er to Sidney Dillon), besides three or four of her 
foals by Boydello 2:14%, Monterey 2:09%. These 
are a very choice lot of youngsters. Twenty fine 
park and carriage horses bred at Llano Seco Rancho, 
Butte County, and fitted for sale by Bay wood Slud, 
San Mateo, have also been consigned. Those want- 
ing fine carriage pairs or single drivers should look 
this consignment over. Thos. Smith of Vallejo sends 
two good ones, and his reputation of breeding and 
raising good looking, fast trotters is second to none. 
Mr. P. H. McEvoy of Menlo will send two fine large 
trotting stallions, bred by William Corbitt, that are 
good enough to stand for public service in any coun- 
try. Mr. II. Brace will send Queenie R. 2:12% and 
several other good ones. Mr. K. O'Grady of San 
Mateo has consigned five head of business horses 
that should bring good money as they are good 
goods. There are several other consignments of 
which note will be made hereafter. 



DEATH OF HAMBLETONIAN WILKES. 



The only son of the great Geo. Wilkes on the 
Pacific Coast was counted out by Father Time at 
Hanford, Cal., during the night of January 12th, 
when Hambletonian Wilkes 1679 died. The old stal- 
lion was nearing his twenty-seventh birthday and 
had seemed all right and lively during the day 
previous, so his death was probably from some acute 
cause, instead of old age. 

Hambletonian Wilkes was bred by L. E. Simmons 
of Lexington, Kentucky, and foaled in 1880. He was 
a bay horse of good size and strong conformation, 
with considerable finish. He was sired by George 
Wilkes 2:22, his dam being Mag Lock by Conklin's 
American Star 37, his second dam Lady Irving, the 
dam of Lumps 2:21, by Hambletonian 10, and his 
third dam by Abdallah Chief, a son of Abdallah 1, sire 
of Hambletonian 10. He was sold by Mr. Simmons to 
A. C. Fisk of Coldwater, Michigan, then passed to 
James A. Murphy of Chicago, and then to Colonel R. 
I. Morehead of San Jose, who sold him a few years 
ago to a syndicate of Kings county horsemen, who 
took him to that county, where he died on the 
12th inst. Hambletonian Wilkes was a horse of 
great individuality and even in old age his form and 
action were remarkably preserved, showing his ex- 
cellent constitution and vigor. 

In the stud he did not attain the great reputation 
gained by some of the other sons of George Wilkes, 
but he was a success and sired some excellent race 
trotters and pacers. The most famous of his get 
was that great mare Phoebe Wilkes 2:08%, who 
went through the Grand Circuit in 1892, 1893 and 
1894, defeating many of the greatest trotters of those 
years. She was driven to her record by Myron Mc- 
Henry in 1894 at Nashville, where she won the stake 
for 2:10 class trotters in straight heats in 2:08%, 
2:09% and 2:09%, defeating Nightingale 2:08, Trevil- 
lian 2:08%!, Ellard 2:09% and David B. 2:09%. 
Phoebon W. 2:08% is a full brother to Phoebe Wilkes 
and is a pacer. 

In California Hambletonian Wilkes never received 
the patronage to which his qualities entitled him, but 
he sired a number of good race horses and earned 
the reputation of being a sire of size and good looks, 
as well as speed. The fastest of his get foaled in 
California is Robert 1-. 2:08% pacing, now owned in 
Salt Lake City. Vic Schiller 2:11% trotting, is an- 
other of his get, and the great colt trotter Murray 
M., three-year-old record 2:14, winner of the first 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity, is another. 

Hambletonian Wilkes was the sire of fifteen stand- 
ard trotters and fourteen standard pacers, three of 
his get taking new records this year. Twelve of 
his sons have sired eight trotters and fifteen pacers 
in the standard list, and eighteen of his daughters 
have produced fifteen trotters and eleven pacers in 
this list, of which the fastest performers are Stella 
2:09%, Xava 2:10%, Mae Heart 2:11% and Knott 
Allen 2:13%. As a sire of broodmares we believe 
his fame will be the greater as the years go by, and 
mares by him should be highly treasured and given 
every opportunity in the stud. The sons of George 
Wilkes are rapidly passing and within a very few 
years they will all have passed to horse heaven, as 
Geo. Wilkes died in 1882, twenty-five years ago. 

o 

ONE OF THE VERY BEST. 



Nearest McKinney, that grand looking young stal- 
lion by McKinney 2:11%, owned by T. W. Barstow 
of San Jose, is one of the sort that is not only 
bred to trot but bred to stay. His sire McKinney is 
known as the greatest sire of 2:10 speed that ever 
lived. His dam Maud J. is by Nearest, a sire of 
2:10 speed that is own brother to John A. McKerron 
2:04%, and is by Nutwood Wilkes, a great sire of 
2:10 speed. His second dam, Fanny Menlo, is by 
Menlo, a son of Nutwood, the greatest sire of pro- 
ducing dams that ever lived. Nutwood's daughters 
have produced thirteen in the 2:10 list. His third 
dam, Nellie Anteeo, is by Anteeo 2:16%, son of the 
great Electioneer. Anteeo's daughters have pro- 
duced three 2:10 performers, while Electioneer is 
not only a sire of three 2:10 trotters, but is the 
grandsire of a great many, including Major Delmar 
1:59%, while his daughters have produced five in 
this exclusive list. The fourth dam of Nearest Mc- 
Kinney is by Geo. M. Patchen Jr. 31, one of the 
great old time trotters and stayers, whose daugh- 
ters have been great producers, one of them pro- 
ducing Llda W. 2.18, the dam of Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16%, and another producing James Madison, sire 
of Tuna 2:08% and Brilliant Girl 2:08%, second 
heaviest winner on the Grand Circuit this year. It 
is very plain that, there is neither speed nor stamina 
lacking in the breeding of Nearest McKinney, while 
for con formal ion, good looks and gait there are 
few that can equal him. He will make the season 
of 1907 at San Jose. 

o . — 

BUZZ SAW IS SOLD. 



Hanford, Cal., Jan. 13, 1907. 
F. W. Kelley, San Francisco — Dear Sir: Please 
discontinue my "Buzz Saw" ad, as through this 
medium the colt was sold over a week ago, and I 
neglected to inform you. So much for advertising 
in the Breeder and Sportsman. Very Kesp. yours, 

R. G. WHITE. 

o 

ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



Subscriber, Fresno, Cal. — Mabel C. by Stralhway 
took a pacing record of 2:14% over the Fresno track 
July 24, 1905, winning a dash race in which she beat 
Charley T., II. D. B. and Satin Royal, all trotters. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[ Saturday, January 19, 1907. 



FOURTH PAYMENTS WERE NUMEROUS. 

No less than 179 foals of 1906 had fourth pay- 
ment made on them January 2d in the Pacific Breed- 
ers' Futurity No. 6, which has a value of $7000, 
guaranteed by the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association. The list of foals on which 
this payment was made follows: 

C. K. Avery's s f by Stoneway, dam Nellie by a 
son of Thad Stevens. 

P. E. G. Anzar's foal by Dictatus Medium, dam 
Lottie by a colt by Grosvenor."- 

Thos. H. Brent's ch f Edgarita by Edgar Boy, dam 
Laurelia by Caution; ch c Vincomar by Caution, dam 
baffrona by Antelope. 

I. L. Borden's foal by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Alice 
Pell by Washington; foal by Prince Robert, dam 
Allie Cresco by Cresco; ch c by Prince Robert, dam 
La Belle Altamont by Altamont. 

Jas. L. Bullock's s f Grace H. by Hambletonian 
Wilkes, dam Sally R. by General McClellan. 

Dr. W. H. Button's b c Button Boy by Wasnngton 
McKinney. dam Fayette by Daly. 

Martin Rurnell s br f by Montesol, dam Marcelle 
by Fay Wilkes. 

J. P. Berry's f by Expressive Mac, dam Nell B. 
by Prince Nutwood. 

G. B. Blancbard's b f by Scott McKinney, dam 
Cameline by Direct Line. 

W. L. Bolton's gr c George Vodden by General J. 
li. Frisbie, dam Dolly. 

W. O. Bowers' foal by Silver Bee, dam Sadie Ben- 
ton by Tom Benton. 

Geo. T. Beckers' b f by Zombro, dam Lady Van 
Nuys by Stam B. ; b c by Zombro, dam Topsy; bl c 
by McKenna, dam Whisper by Almont Lightning. 

D. L. Radiant's cr f Sadie B. by Athadon, dam 
Nugget. 

Mrs. L. G. Bonfilio's b c Crescendo by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam Atherine by Patron. 

Jacob Brolliar's br f Zonelita by Zolock, dam 
Stonelita by Stoneway. 

J. F. Bryne's ch c by Exchange, dam Widow Ma- 
chree by Silkwood. 

O. C. Benbow's foal by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Baby 
by Long Branch. 

0. F. Berquette's br c by Stoneway, dam by 
Brown's Patchen. 

T. W. Rarstow's b c by Nearest McKinney, dam 
Just It by Nearest. 

Alex. Brown's bl c by Nushagak, dam Anselois by 
Prince Ansel; br f by Nushagak, dam Nutflower by 
Nutwood Wilkes; ch f by Prince Ansel, dam Ser- 
pola by Mendocino; b f by Prnce Ansel, dam Ma- 
jella B. by Nushagak. 

A. Butz's br c A. B. Hal by Hal B., dam Maud by 
Silkwood. 

1. E. Bular's br f Zoriene by Zolock, dam Corriene 
by Red Cloak. 

H. Brace's foal by Greco, dam Sadie Moor by 
the Grand Moor; foal by Greco, dam Ranker's Daugh- 
ter by Arthur Wilkes; foal by Greco, dam Lizzie S. 
by Antevolo; foal by Greco, dam Myrtha T. by Ham- 
bletonian Wilkes. 

C. A. Canfield's b c by Zombro, dam Mamie Eliza- 
beth. 

Lewis Charlton's b c by Dumont S., dam Rose 
Thorne by Hawthorne. 

Martin Carter's b f Ella M. R. by Lord Alwin, dam 
Excella by Monbells. 

S. Christenson's ch f by Strathway, dam Lady 
Estelle by Athadon; bl f by Strathway, dam Mar- 
garet K. by Don Pedro; ch f by Strathway, dam 
Simone by Simmons. 

H. Cox's foal by Wayland W., dam by Designer. 

W. A. Clark Jr.'s b f by Highland C, dam Lucie 
May by Oakland Raron; bl f by Highland O, dam 
She by Abbotsford; bl c by Highland C, dam Ruth 
Mary by Directum; bl c by Highland O, dam Bay 
Leaf by Telephone; b f by Highland O, dam Patty 
D. by Ultimus; b f by Hal B.. dam Christobel by 
Chas. Derby; b f by The Bondsman, dam Ron Mot 
by Erin. 

S. H. Cowell's s f Zaza by Henry Nutwood, dam 
Two Minutes by Wildnut. 

L. Y. Dollenmayer's b f by Hambletonian Wilkes, 
dam Ida May by Grosvenor. 

Rick De Bernardi's b c by Strathway, dam Rosata 
by McKinney. 

E. D. Dudley's ch c by Palite, dam Bee by Ster- 
ling; ch c by Palite. dam Babe by Dawnlight. 

Dr. J. P. Dunn's b f by Petigru, dam Nora Mac 
by McKinney. 

Henry Delaney's c by Kinney Lou, dam Marguer- 
ite by Tom Benton; br c by Zolock, dam Belle 
Pointer by Sky Pointer; b c by Zolock, dam Etta 
Wilkes. 

F. N. Folsom's s f by Lynwood W., dam Diamonica 
by Diawood. 

J. A. Fairchild's br f by Stanton Wilkes, dam 
Nellie H. by McKinney. 

Geo. A. Fox's b c by Cresceus, dam Silpan by Sil- 
ver Bow. 

Miss Alice Frazier's b c by Murray M., dam Nie- 
nah by Nutford. 

J. A. Garver's foal by Robt. Basler, dam Lady Way 
by Stoneway. 

T. B. Gibson's b f Virginia Lee by Iran Alto, dam 
Maggie by Soudan. 

E. A. Gammon's bl f Nita H. by Zolock, dam Lilv 
S. by Direct. 

W. H. Hoy's s f Complete by Palite, dam Camilla 
by Bayswater Wilkes. 

H. S. Hogoboom's s c by Palo King, dam Diawalda 
by Diablo. 

G. K. Hostetter's foal by Robt. Direct, dam Lou 
Lively by Boodle. 



M. Henry's b f True by Bonnie Direct, dam Hulda 
by Guide. 

J. W. Haile & Co.'s foal by Demonio, dam Olita 
by Bradtmoor; foal by Demonio, dam Hanora by 
Oro Wilkes; foal by Demonio, dam May Norris by 
Morris; foal by Demonio, dam Laura H. by Nutwood 
Wilkes; foal by Demonio, dam Hannah by Le 
Grande; foal by Demonio, dam Sister by Nutwood 
Wilkes. 

Wm. Hendrickson's br f by McKena, dam Ohio 
by Peveril; b f by McKena, dam Maud by Grover 
Clay. 

T. M. Hartsook's ch c by Victory, dam Bird by 
Aaron. 

Henry Hahn's ch c Lecket by Lecco, dam Hen- 
rietta by Boodle. 

F. Hahn's b c Goldfield by Chas. Derby, dam Nellie 
Emoline by Leo Corbett. 

W. R. Humfreville's br c by Kinney Lou, dam Nel- 
lie by Jim Mulvenny. 

C. L. Hollis' s c Stam Hopkins by Stamboulet, 
dam Sis Hopkins by Strathway. 

E. P. Ileald's b f by Count Hannibal, dam Nona 
Y. by Admiral; b f by Tom Smith, dam Nona Wash- 
ington by Geo. Washington; b f by Tom Smith, dam 
Lady Marvin by Don Marvin; b f by Tom Smith, 
dam Princess McKinney by McKinney. 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings' foal by Parole, dam Sappho 
by Robt. McGregor. 

Julian R. Hoyt's foal by Demonio, dam Ethel H. 
by Sultan. 

C. L. Jones' c Carlrea by Carlokin, dam Lady Rea 
by Iran Alto; f Nanalea by Carlokin, dam Walda 
by Waldstein. 

J. li. lverson's ch f by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Ivon- 
eer by Eugeneer; s c by Delphi, dam Wilhelmina 
II by Eugeneer; bl c by Lecco, dam Amy I. by 
Diablo; b c Coronado, dam Membrita by Carr's 
Mamb.; br c by Delphi, dam Anita I. by Dictatus. 

P. A. Isenor's b f by Murray M., dam Lilly Mac 
by McKinney. 

J. A. Jones' bl f by Capt. Jones, dam Daisy Q. 
Hill by Altamont; bl c by Capt. Jones, dam Alta 
Norte by Del Norte; bl f by Capt. Jones, dam Lady 
Beach by Altamont. 

Joost Bros.' br or bl c by Ronnie Direct, dam Pre- 
sumption by Steinway. 

Fred Jasper's br c by Wayland W., dam Nellie J. 
by St. Patrick. 

J. H. Jack's bl c Cochise by Lecco, dam Winnie 
Wilkes by Rey W r ilkes. 

Thos. P. Kell's b c by J. R. C, dam Fanny Menlo 
by Menlo. 

E. C. Keyt's bl c by Red Seal, dam Mildred by 
Couer d'Alene; b f by Red Seal, dam Mai Mont by 
Malcolm. 

Geo. W. Kirkman's bl c by Stoneway, dam Ida 
Basler by Robt. Basler; b c Stoneman by Stoneway, 
dam Ethel Basler by Robt. Basler. 

F. W. Kimble's bl f by Kinney Lou, dam Princess 
Leola by Leonel. 

J. D. Kalar's foal by Delphi, dam Duplicate by 
Chas. Derby. 

Paul M. Knauf's b c Paul M. by Murray M., dam 
Docy Doe by Blackwood Mamb. 

Miss Minnie E. Lewis' foal by Cruzados, dam Delia 
Norte by Del Norte; foal by Cruzados, dam Mollie L. 
by Carbou. 

La Siesta Ranch's br or bl f by Coronado, dam 
Bessie Wilkes by Aptos. 

Mrs. Mabel Lipson's b c Bobbie Gaylor by Hamble- 
tonian Wilkes, dam Miss Goldnote by Goldnote. 

J. Elmo Montgomery's b c Jim Logan by Chas. 
Derby, dam Effie Logan by Durfee. 

Dr. A. McLaughlin's b c Tom Fitzgerald by Mc- 
Myrtle, dam Maggie N. by Gossiper. 

L. H. Mcintosh's b f by Arner, dam Kitty by Ar- 
thur Wilkes. 

E. Z. Miller's b c by Stam Boy, dam Straightness 
by Chas. Derby. 

L. Morris' foal by Hambletonian Wilkes, dam Lily 
I. by Iris. 

J. W. Marshall's b f by Iran Alto, dam Trix by 
Nutwood Wilkes. 

Mabry McMahan's br c by I Direct, dam Chamois 
by Shamrock. 

Ray Mead's f by Monbello, dam Carrie B. by Alex. 
Button. 

Geo. H. McCann's foal by Palo King, dam Fidelity 
by Falrose. 

J. C. Mowry's foal by Kinney Lou, dam Electress 
Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Wm. Morgan's bl c Tracy by Diablo, dam Grace 
McK. by McKinney; b f Cony by Zombro, dam Con- 
nie by Conner. 

W. W. Mendenhall's foal by Strathway. dam Elsie 
Downs by Boodle; foal by a McKinney-Attilla colt, 
dam Rosie Woodburn by Easter Wilkes. 

Felix McCabe's s c by Stoneway, dam Bessie Hub- 
bard by Hubbard Jr. 

I. C. Mosher's b c Hal McKinney by Hal B., dam 
Juliet D. by McKinney. 

C. S. Neal's foal by Zolock, dam Fanny Gossip by 
Gossiper. 

R. O. Newman's br f by Robert Direct, dam Dew- 
drop Basler by Robt. Basler. 

T. W. Orme's foal by Izalco, dam Ziska by Zo- 
lock. 

Chris G. Owen's br f Lou McKinney by Kinney 
Lou, dam Nancy O. by Clay S. 

K. O'Grady's bl f by Highland, dam Nellie White 
by Hart Boswell. 

E. T. Parker's s c Prince Lock by Zolock, dam 
Nolahka by Nutford. 

Dana Perkins' foal by Stam B.. dam Osey by Tom 
Benton; foal by Stam B., dam Zaza by Bay Bird. 

Jasper Paulson's foal by McKena, dam Laura 
Dillon by Sidney Dillon; b c by McKena, dam 



Mowat by Owyhee; foal by Milbrae, dam Helen Car- 
oline by Campaign. 

S. D. Parks' b c Duke of Milpitas by Neptune, dam 
Margerita by Tempest. 

J. T. Royles' b c Sanmetto by Diablo, dam Shinola 
by a son of Waldstein. 

Z. T. Rueker's foal by Bonnie McK., dam Diamond 
Bell by Grey Wood. 

John Renatti's s f by Sir John S., dam Madeline. 

E. D. Roberts' br c Lugo Stanley by On Stanley, 
dam Colton Maid by Maxamillian. 

Geo. Ramage's b f by Lecco, dam Clara Oakley 
by Sidney Dillon. 

N. M. Strong's foal by Ben Z., dam May Kinney 
by Silkwood. 

John Suglian's b c King Kohlan by Kohlan King, 
dam Clytie by Magister. 

Richard Smith's br c by McKenna, dam Edith 
Apetz by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Louis Stock's foal by Diablo, dam Donnagene by 
Athadon. 

E. A. Swaby's f Grace S. by Nushagak, dam Antie 
by Antevolo. 

Chas. F. Silva's foal by Zolock, dam Polka Dot 
by Mendocino; foal by Stam B. .darn Swift Bird by 
Waldstein; foal by Coronado, dam Queen S. by 
Sable Wilkes. 

Henry Struve's b f by Welcome, dam Hagar Wilkes 
by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Thos. Smith's bl c by General J. B. Frisbie. dam 
Reinette by Dexter Prince. 

L. H. Todhunter's foal by Zombro, dam The Silver 
Bell by Silver Bow; foal by Zombro, dam Lomo B. 
by Stam B. 

Ezra Tilden's br f by Zombro, dam Tessa. 

J. H. Torrey's b f Gracie T. by Zombro, dam Man- 
illa by Shadeland Hero. 

M. M. Vincent's rn c by Expressive Mac, dam Car- 
mon by News Boy. 

J. L. Vignes' foal by Zombro, dam Cleopatra V. 
by Regallo. 

E. D. W T affle's b m Zoe by Zombro, dam Leah by 
Secretary. 

The Warren Ranch's s f Lady Warren by Sena- 
tor L., dam Countess Knight by Knight. 

Geo. L. Warlow's foal by Stanford McKinney, dam 
Strathalie by Strathway; foal by Stanford McKinney, 
dam Sextette by Athablo; foal by Athadon. dam Bes- 
sie; foal by Robt. Direct, dam Coradon by Athadon. 

A. E. Walker's foal by Murray M.. dam Midget. 

Chas. Whitehead's foal by Delphi, dam Nina B. 
by Electioneer. 

Fred Wadham's br f by Petigru, dam Johannah 
Treat by Thos. Rysdick. 

Capt. C. H. Williams' foal by Nutwood Wilkes, dam 
Twenty-Third by Director; foal by Unimak, dam 
Alta Nola by Altamont; foal by Unimak, dam Royal 
Net by Royal Sid. 

P. J. Williams' bl c The Major by Monterey, dam 
Leap Year by Tempest. 

S. B. Wright's b c by Lynwood W., dam Maud 
Patchen by Idaho Patchen. 

S. B. Weight's br f by Stanton Wilkes, dam Zolita 
by Zolock; b c by Monocrat, dam Alta Rena by Atto 
Rex. 

J. W. Zibbell's foal ty Tom Smith, dam Kate Lum- 
ry by Shadeland Onward. 

o 

THE BLUE RIBBON MEETING. 

The formal announcement that Detroit will resume 
its time-honored place in the Grand Circuit next 
season will be received with a feeling of satisfac- 
tion by all light harness horsemen. For years the 
annual Blue Ribbon meeting of the Grosse Pointe 
track was the big event of the Grand Circuit chain, 
and the two stakes, the Merchants' and Manufac- 
turers', $10,000 for 2:24 trotters, and the Chamber 
of Commerce, $5,000 for 2:24 pacers, were the classic 
events in which the hopes of scores of aspiring 
owners, breeders and trainers were entered. To win 
one of these meant as much to the harness horse- 
man as the winning of a Suburban or American 
Derby to the followers of the thoroughbred. For 
seventeen years the M. & M. had been battled for 
at the annual gathering of the clans in the City 
of the Straits, but last season the prosecuting at- 
torney of Wayne county, in which Detroit is situated, 
became inoculated with the vmus of so-called reform, 
and his sudden opposition caused the abandonment 
of the Blue Ribbon meeting and the transfer of the 
M. & M. and C. of C. to Cleveland, where they were 
raced off at the Grand Circuit meeting the first week 
in August. The horsemen, merchants and business 
men of all classes in Detroit were up in arms against 
the unwarranted interference of the prosecuting at- 
torney, and when he asked for a renomination at 
the primaries last year he received such an emphatic 
turn-down that it left no doubt in his mind as to 
what the rank and file of the electors thought of his 
reform ideas. His successor in office is a broad- 
minded citizen who, when he occupied the office 
several years ago. was a good friend of racing as 
conducted by the Detroit Driving Club. The Grosse 
Pointe track has been leased for a meeting next 
July; the two classic stakes will be renewed and 
the meeting will be conducted as usual by President 
D. J. Campau, with Albert H. Moone of Providence, 
R. I., in the secretary's chair. With Detroit back 
in line again prospects are bright for a meeting in 
. rovidence now that, the Narragansett Park tangle 
has been straightened out — and Columbus willing 
to give a two weeks' meeting if Cincinnati drops 
out — the outlook for the Grand Circuit of 1907 is 
more than bright. — Chicago Horseman. 



Saturday, January 19, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



CALIFORNIA CAN BE REPRESENTED- 



Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 10, 1907. 
The Breeder and Sportsman. San Francisco, Cal. — 
Dear Sirs: The communication in your issue of 
January 5th from Benj. M. Cram is very much to the 
point, and it is pleasing to note that the breeders of 
California are interested in the organization of the 
American Association of Trotting Horse Breeders, 
which we hope will work material benefit to our horse 
and breeding interests. In answering Mr. Cram's com- 
munication I would say that provision was made by 
the committee on organization for fifty directors. 
When selection was made there were only forty-eight 
named, one reason that the fifty was not completed 
was the fact that the committee did not know who 
to select as representatives from the Pacific Coast. 
Primarily, of course, they wanted to make their 
selection of men who would take an active interest 
in the organization in order that it might be made 
as strong as possible throughout the West. As the 
committee were unable to decide what men to select 
as representing the Pacific Coast, this selection was 
left for a future meeting, and the secretary was in- 
structed to communicate with different people with 
a view of having the selection, when made, as wise 
and beneficial for all interests as possible. In follow- 
ing this matter out we would be only too pleased to 
receive communications from anybody on the Pacific 
Coast interested in this movement, suggesting names 
of men to represent that territory on the board of 
directors. The list of directors as selected of course 
cannot be complete, and as published is not official, 
for the simple reason that a man cannot be con- 
sidered a director until he has accepted. For this 
reason there will undoubtedly be some changes in 
the list that has already been published, and the 
total number of fifty cannot be completed until the 
next meeting of the executive committee. We can 
assure our friends in California and the far West 
that this movement is meant to be strictly national 
in its character. There is to be no sectionalism or 
partisanship in the organization or management of 
the Breeders' Association. We hope to have every 
man as a member who is interested in any way in 
our horses, and furthermore it is our hope that our 
membership may become so large that the Associa- 
tion may have political influence fpr all that may go 
to aid and benefit our breeding interests. Trusting 
your readers may take time to send us names of 
any people who they would like to see members or 
directors of the Association and that we may have 
the hearty support and sympathy of the entire terri- 
tory as represented by the Breeder and Sportsman, 
Yours very truly, 

American Association of Trotting Horse Breeders. 

H. K. DEVEREUX, Secretary. 

■ o 

FROM THE RAISIN CENTER. 



Fresno, Cal., Jan. 12, 1907. 
Breeder and Sportsman: A line or two about the 
track quarters. At present there are five trainers 
here, and they have some very promising prospects 
in hand. 

Joe Depoister has Milton Gear, green pacer by 
Harry Gear. He is a young horse with 2:08 speed. 

Charley Middleton has five head, with three very 
promising green pacers among them. One by Strath- 
way 2:19 that has shown quarters in 32 seconds and 
a half in 1:05, one by Diablo 2:09 that can reel 
off a half right nicely in 1:04, and another by Athby, 
son of Athadon, is a wind splitter that with very 
little work has shown a half in 1:07. 

Mr. Owens has Jonesa Basler 2:1114 and a three- 
year-old black colt by Robert Direct that is a Fu- 
turity lad. Look out for this one, boys. 

Trainer Mayo has a string of six head that are 
a very fine lot of youngsters. Among them is a 
five-year-old full brother to Toggles 2:08%, and it 
will take one as good as Togfles to catch him. A 
little black mare, four years old, is a half sister to 
that double-gaited mare Oma A. 2:10% pacing, and 
2: 16% trotting, and is a little black demon at the 
trot. You will see her at the races this summer. A 
two-year-old and a four-year-old by Strathway are 
nice smooth going trotters as any one would wish 
to see, and there is a little black pacer, half brother 
to Dr. W. 2:08%, that is being talked about. 

S. C. Walton has a large stable of horses headed 
by the grand trotting stallion Athasham 2:12. The 
son of Athadon is fat, but in grand shape, and the 
2:12 trotters that beat him this year will find they 
have something to do when they head him. Walton 
has two two-year-olds by Athadon that are hummers 
and will no doubt prove fast by the time the summer 
races begin. He has also some Futurity yearling 
colts by Expressive Mac that have been worked but 
five weeks, yet can show a 2:40 clip handily and have 
a nice smooth way of going. A yearling by Athablo 
can also step down the line some. In this string is 
a full sister to The Donna 2:09% that is eight months 
old. She is a good looker and well staked, and Wal- 
ton says he is after first money with her. A four- 
year-old pacer by Athadon that has been worked 
two months has stepped a mile in 2:22%. There is 
a five-year-old by Strathway, owned by Mr. Await, 
that has shown considerable speed at the pacing gait. 
Nogi by Athablo, dam Cora Wickersham, will make 
some of the three-year-olds step this year, as he has 
developed into a strong rugged built colt that will 
he after first money in the Breeders' Futurity, Occo- 
dent and Stanford Stakes. 

There are several others which will be mentioned 
at some future date. 

SUBSCRIBER. 



ANOTHER ALLERTON IN CAILFORNIA. 



Visalia, Cal., Jan. 13, 1907. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman: While at home 
this morning in answer to a call at the phone I took 
down the receiver and recognized the voice of Mr. 
R. O. Newman, owner of the stallion Robert Direct, 
who informed me that he had just bought from C. 
W. Williams of Galesburg, Illinois, a two-year-old 
stallion that is one of the greatest bred sons of the 
great Allerton 2:09%, and while he has sold many 
high priced colts of great promise, Mr. Williams says 
Mr. Newman's purchase is the greatest trotter he 
ever bred. Now it must be that there is some truth 
in his declaration, and the breeders of this Coast 
are to be congratulated on the presence of this 
young son of Allerton. His first dam is a daughter 
of Expedition 2:15% (son of Electioneer) and has 
a record of 2:18%. and has two full sisters with rec- 
ords of 2:11% and 2:15%; second dam by Axtell 2:12, 
that is the dam of five trotters whose records average 
2:17%; third dam a mare with a record that is a 
full sister to the one time queen, Maud S. 2:08%, 
and is also a producer; fourth dam the great Miss 
Russell, dam of Nutwood, etc., by Pilot Jr. 

Is it any wonder that Mr. Williams says this is 
the greatest trotter he ever bred? As a companion 
to Robert Direct this gives Mr. Newman two of the 
best bred stallions to be found in California. I had 
Robert Direct in my string for two months, and dur- 
ing all that time he was badly affected with pink-eye 
and I could not do much with him, but I saw 
enough to convince me that he is a perfect mannered 
reliable horse of extreme speed, and as Mr. Newman 
is game, he will yet send Robert Direct to the races 
to the sorrow of many that will then hook up with 
him. 

I own a 15%-hand filly, weighing 1,050 pounds, sired 
by Robert Direct and out of Ethel Basler, who in 
turn is a full sister to the dam of Robert Direct. She 
is a coal black, three years old, and I believe she is 
without any exception one of the greatest racing pros- 
pects I ever saw — one of those Direct-gaited, rapid 
going pacers that doesn't need hopples or funny 
shoes, and can be desperately driven without leaving 
her feet. That she will be fit to race anywhere in 
any class in which pacers are raced I fully believe. 

If anyone should think that the maternal lines 
of Robert Direct are not so strong and potent as his 
paternal lines, I can controvert this through this 
filly, who does not carry one drop of blood in her 
veins that is not represented in Robert Direct, and 
what is more convincing the blood of Robert Direct's 
dam is doubled in this handsome, speedy, big filly, 
since her dam, Ethel Basler, is a full sister to Robert 
Direct's dam. Nor does it stop at that, since Ethel 
Basler, mated with other sires, is promising to be a 
wonderful producer of extreme speed. Every one of 
her first four foals by different sires, which are all 
that are old enough to train, have shown two minute 
speed, and two of them, My Way and Stonelita, have 
records of 2:15%, while Ira Basler by Iris, I worked 
two months as a three-year-old and he stepped a 
full mile in 2:22, last eighth in 15 seconds. He is 
being held till his five-year-old form to race. The 
uniform quality and finish of all the get of this mare, 
Ethel Basler cannot be excelled by any mare that 
ever lived. I am sending you a picture of Stonelita 
(3) 2:15%, taken only a few days ago. After wean- 
ing a Zolock filly and being harnessed the first time 
in over a year, she stepped the last eighth of a mile 
in 14 seconds. With all this showing one who would 
question the blood of Robert Direct's dam as not 
being at par with that of his illustrious sire, will not 
likely succeed as a breeder of quality and speed, ex- 
cept by accident. 

JACOB BROLLIAR. 

-o 

OREGON MAY HAVE $5,000 PACE. 



They are talking about a $5,000 stake for the 2:09 
pacing class at the Oregon State Fair this year, to 
be governed by the handicap entrance system which 
originated in the Hartford Association last year, and 
by which the entrance fee is graded according to 
the record of the horses — more money being required 
on those with fast records than on those with slow 
records or no records at all. It proved very popular 
at Hartford and attracted a big entry list to the 
Charter Oak 2:09 trot for a purse of $10,000. In 
this race horses with records of 2:08% to 2:09 paid 
5 per cent, those with records from 2:09% to 2:10 
paid 4 per cent, those with records from 2:10% to 
2:11 paid 3 per cent and those with records from 
2:11% to 2:12 paid 2 per cent. Horses without rec- 
ords or with records slower than 2:12 only paid 1 % 
per cent. This novel stake drew an entry list of 
seventy-nine horses, of which fifty-six had records 
slower than 2:12 or no records at all. Out of this 
list no less than sixteen started in the race. The 
race was won by Nutboy 2:07%, who won the first 
two heats and was second in the third, which was 
won by Oro 2:05%. Each heat was a race for $3,000, 
divided into three moneys, and $1,000 went to the 
horse standing best in the summary at the end of 
three heats. 

o 

Skagway, Alaska, possesses one family carriage — 
the only one, so far as is known, in that section of 
the country. It also has two hotel buses and several 
express wagons. Juneau boasts of a few teams for 
the delivery of goods and Ketchikan is literally a 
"one-horse" town, there being but one horse in the 
entire village of 1000 persons. Wrangel, which is 
one of the oldest settlements of the northland and 
was established by the Russian American Fur Com- 
pany nearly one hundred years ago, is absolutely 
horseless. — Newark Sunday Call. 



THE CROWLEY SIDE STAKE. 



When the Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stake for 
foals of 1904 is decided this year there will be quite 
an interesting side race in both trotting and pacing 
divisions for the money in the Crowley Stake. It 
will be remembered that this is a side stake or- 
iginated by Mr. T. J. Crowley, one of the directors 
of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Asso- 
ciation, and is for colts and fillies nominated in 
Breeders' Futurity No. 4. An entrance fee of $25 
was paid on each one of twenty-seven foals, giving 
the side stake a total value of $675, which is to bo 
diviled proportionately between trotters and pacers. 
The three-year olds competing for the moneys in 
the Pacific Breeders' Futurity will race at the same 
time and in the same race for the money of the 
Crowley Stake, which is to be divided 75 and 25 per 
cent. Of the twenty-seven original entries to this 
stake on which the payment of $25 was made, there 
are nineteen still eligible as follows: 

Mr. I. L. Borden's b. c. by Nutwood Wilkes, dam 
Allie Cresco, and s. f. by Cresco Wilkes, lam Alice 
Bell. 

Alex Brown's b. c. by Prince Ansel, dam Lottie, 
and b. f. by Nushagak, lam Pioche. 

Thos. Brentz' filly, Riena del Norte by Del Norte, 
dam Laurelia. 

T. W. Barstow's filly Aunt Joe by Iran Alto, dam 
Rose McKinney. 

Elwert & Berryman's b. c. by Monterey, dam Dot 
McKinney. 

Griffith & lvicConnell's b. f. by Bonnie Direct, dam 
Victoria S. 

F. Hahn's blk. c. by Chas. Derby, dam Nellie Emo- 
line. 

La Siesta Farm's Mogolore by Iran Alto, dam 
Lady Belle Isle. 

Geo. McCann's filly by John A., dam Fidelity by 
Falrose. 

.1. J. McMahon's b. f. Jubilee by Prince Nutwood, 
dam by Gen. McClellan Jr. 

D. S. Matthews' Valentine B. by Edward B., dam 
by Tarac. 

J. A. Milton's b. c. Bay Guy by Guy McKinney, 
dam by King Dent 

F. J. Kilpatrick's b. f. McKinney Belle by Wash- 
ington McKinney, dam Zora by Daly. 

H. P. Smith's b. c. Monte Norfolk by Montesol, 
dam by Duke of Norfolk. 

W. W. Mendenhall's b. f. May Time by Stam B., 
dam Elsie Downs by Boodle. 

C. H. Williams' blk. c. Oro W. by Del Oro, dam 
Royal Net by Royal Sid. 

L. H. Todhunter's b. c. Hymettus by Zombro, dam 
by Silver Bow. 

o — : 

WHY HAY IS $22 A TON IN SAN FRANCISCO. 



Horse owners who are now paying $22 a ton for 
hay in San Francisco may unaerstand the situation 
better by reading the following from the Hollister 
Free Lance of the 11th inst.: 

A petition was circulated by R. P. Lathrop, Wed- 
nesday, addressed to General Manager Calvin of the 
Southern Pacific Company and calling attention to 
the shameful manner the people of this section have 
been treated in the matter of cars for hay shipment. 
It was freely signed, for our people not only feel, 
they "know, they have a grievance. 

Practically ever since last April Hollister has been 
denied the privilege of shipping hay to San Fran- 
cisco. And this, too, when other points along the 
Southern Pacific have been accorded the privilege. 
Why Hollister and San Benito county have been, and 
still are, discriminated against is known only to the 
Southern Pacific officials. Permission was granted 
to ship hay from this station to San Francisco 
several weeks ago, the maximum amount being 
placed at three cars daily, but even this small con- 
cession was speedily withdrawn, although other sta- 
tions along the line are still enjoying the privilege. 

Hay is one of the chief products of this valley, 
and Hollister hay is always sought after and com- 
mands the highest market price wherever sold. The 
bulk of our hay, almost our entire output, is sold in 
San Francisco. It is to that city we largely look 
for the sale of the product. To be deprived of that 
market works a hardship that cannot be longer en- 
dured with patience. It means the loss of thou- 
sands of dollars to people who have bought hay here 
in good faith; to many of our own people who have 
not as yet, sold last season's crop; a loss to which 
the Southern Pacific is apparently iudifferent, but 
which to speak mildly, is exasperating to a people 
who have been made only too plainly to feel that 
they are at the mercy of that corporation — a galling 
knowledge that doesn't make the burden imposed 
upon them any easier to bear. 

That the condition which confronts the haymen 
is serious becomes evident when it is stated that in 
the warehouses in this city there Is 22,775 tons of 
hay. To move this hay to market will require eigh- 
teen cars a day from now until June 1st. At that 
time the new crop will be ready, making conditions 
still more serious. Something must be done and 
at once. The people of Hollister have been patient 
and long suffering. They arc entitled to the relief 
asked for, or at least to be treated as other places 
are treated. A "public be damned" policy no longer 
sets well on our stomachs. 

o 

PILES CUBED IN 6 TO 14 DAYS. 

PAZO OINTMENT Is guaranteed to cure any case 
of Itching, Blind, Bleeding or Protruding Piles in 6 to 
14 days or money refunded. 50c. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 19, 1907. 



| NOTES AND NEWS | 

*I* *I* *J**J* *J* *♦* **• *♦* *i* > J» *** ♦** «J* *!♦ *** *I* *I* *t* *J* •£* »J* •$* *»-• *l* *i* *J» *J* 

The Pleasanton Driving Club, assisted by the citi- 
zens of that town, will tender a banquet to the dele- 
gates to the convention which meets there to-day to 
organize a California circuit. 



All the horses belonging to the estate of James 
Coffin will be sold at auction by Fred H. Chase & Co. 
at 478 Valencia street, this city, on Monday, February 
25th. This is one of the choicest lot of high bred 
trotters and pacers in California. Mr. Coffin had 
collected them during the past few years with the in- 
tention of establishing a breeding farm which he had 
just purchased at Pleasanton a few weeks prior to 
his untimely death last month. There are stallions, 
colts, fillies and brood mares in this consignment 
that would grace any stock farm in America, and 
prospective buyers should send immediately to Mr. 
Chase for catalogues. An extended announcement 
of this sale will appear next week. 



Geo. Fox, of Clements, has named his colt by 
Cresceus 2:02% out of Silpan by Silver Bow 2:16, 
second dam by Pancoast, in Pacific Breeders Futurity 
No. G, which is for foals of 1906. 



The bay colt by Chas. Derby and Effie Logan, the 
dam of Sir Albert S. 2:03%, has been named Jim 
Logan by his owner Elmo Montgomery, of Davisville. 
Jim Logan is entered in the Breeders Futurity for 
foals of 1906. 



J. \V. Marshall of Dixon, who won the three-year- 
old pacing division of the Breeders Futurity in 1905 
with Moua Wilkes 2: 11%, a filly by Demonio 2:11%, 
out of Trix by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, and also won 
the two-year-old division of the same stake in 1906 
with Aerolite 2:15% by Searchlight 2:03% out of 
Trix, has a filly out of this great mare named in 
the Futurity for foals of 1906. This filly is by Iran 
Alto and looks like a first money winner already. 



Electress Wilkes 2:28%, the dam of Lady Mowry 
2:09%, has a foal by Kinney Lou 2:07%, that has 
been named in the Pacific Breeders Futurity for foals 
of 1906 by her owner, Mr. J. C. Mowry. 



Mr. E. T. Parker has named a full brother to 
Zolahka 2:23% in the Breeders Futurity for foals 
division of 1906. Zolahka won the two-year-old 
trotting division of this stake last year. 



If there is anything in breeding from producing 
lines, the colt that Mr. Geo. L. Warlow of Fresno 
has nominated in the Pacific Breeders Futurity for 
foals of 1906, should be one of the best. Its sire is 
his young stallion Stanford McKinney, foaled 1903, 
sired by McKinney 2:11%, the greatest sire of 2:10 
trotters that has ever lived. Stanford McKinney's 
dam is Avena 2:27, a producing mare by Palo Alto 
2:08%, son of Electioneer, his second dam also a 
producer by Gen. Benton, third dam by Kentucky 
Prince and fourth dam by Hambletonian 10. The foal 
by Stanford McKinney is out of Strathalie by Strath- 
way, sire of Toggles 2:08%, John Caldwell 2:08%, 
etc., next dam the famous mare Athalie, that is the 
dam of Ira 2:10%, Athanio 2:10, Athnio 2:14%, Atha- 
don (1) 2:27, and Athablo 2:29%. In the veins of 
this foal there is as much 2:10 blood as can be found 
in any youngster in the stake. 



The mare Dictratress 2:08% is offered for sale. She 
is standard and registered, sound and all right and is 
in foal to Hal B. 2:04%. See advertisement. 



Mr. William M. Bryant of Alton, Cal., has sent 
us the picture of a colt he owns jointly with Mr. 
D. J. East, that is a "corking good looker" and must 
be a good one as it won first prize as a suckling at 
the Ferndale, Humboldt county, fair in 1905, and 
again took first prize as a yearling in 1906. It will 
be two years old on the 24th of April, this year. The 
colt is by Stam B. 2:11%, dam Lady Listein by 
Waldstein, second dam Lizzie S. by Antevolo, third 
dam Lady Signal by Signal, fourth dam by Blooms- 
bury, thoroughbred, and fifth dam by Billy McCrack- 
en. The fifth time this colt ever had a harness on, 
and the first time he was ever on a track, he trotted 
a quarter in 1:10 hitched to a breaking cart. He 
is very closely related to that fast trotter Swift B. 
2:12%, as both are by the same sire and out of 
mares by Waldstein. 



The San Bernardino County Driving Club will hold 
a racing matinee in Association Park, Washington's 
birthday. Riverside has promised to send eighteen 
horses from its club and an excellent program will 
be arranged. Probably the clubs will take advan- 
tage of the new rule and charge a small admission 
fee to the grounds. The following officers were re- 
cently elected by the Riverside Club: President, R. 
T. Curtis of Redlands; vice-president, Maurice Grif- 
fin, Riverside; secretary and treasurer, Thomas 
Holmes, San Bernardino; board of directors, Thos. 
Holmes, R. W. MacGillivray, W. M. Rourke, George 
H. Parker, all of San Bernardino; R. T. Curtis and 
J. E. Fairchild of Redlands; G. W. Prescott, High- 
land; Maurice Griffin and John Garner, Riverside; 
speed committee, W. M. Rourke, George H. Parker, 
G. W- Bunne'l. 



Mr. S. Christenson of this city has purchased from 
Mr. Desmond of Los Angeles the mare Katherine A. 
by Diablo 2:09%. This mare was worked four heats 
at Los Angeles last year, three of them in 2:15 or 
better, the fastest being in 2:11%. She is a good 
prospect for a race mare. 



Alta Vela 2:11% by Electioneer has a daughter 
that is a producer. At Los Angeles on November 
24th of last year Vela McKinney by McKinney, out 
of Black Swan by Alta Vela, won a heat in 2:23% 
and is credited with this record on the books of the 
National Trotting Association. 



Several Eastern journals have stated that Hulda 
2:08% was sold for $100 at the recent sale of Aptos 
Farm horses. This is an error. Hulda was the only 
one catalogued not sold, and she was bid in by the 
farm and will doubtless end her days in the rich 
pastures of the Spreckels ranch on Monterey Bay. 



The filly by John A. McKerron 2:04%, out of 
Nancy Hanks 2:04, has been named Nancy McKer- 
ron. She is in all the Futurities. 



Pat Davey will take a few of the La Siesta horses 
to Pleasanton when the weather settles. 



The Pleasanton Driving. Club will give a program 
of three races to-day if the weather is pleasant. 
The track is all right most any day, but the members 
of the club don't fancy driving in rain or snow, as 
they are not used to it. 



The American Horse Breeder, Boston, Mass., has 
made quite a radical departure in the conditions gov- 
erning entry to its fourth annual Futurity race for 
mares bred in 1906, foals of 1907. The entrance fee 
has been lowered to $1. The purse is $10,000, of which 
$7,000 will go to the trotters and $3,000 to the 
pacers. Owners of in-foal trotting and pacing brood- 
mares can hardly afford to miss entering them in 
a stake in which the fee is as low as $1. Full 
particulars may be obtained from the' American 
Horse Breeder, 161 High street, Boston, Mass. 



McKinney's 2:15 list keeps growing and now num- 
bers forty, while his daughters have, produced six 
in that list. 



Pacific Breeders' Futurity No. 5 has a guaranteed 
value of $7,000, and the colts and fillies entered 
in it are now two years old. A payment of $10 
each will be due on these foals February 1st. See 
advertisement. 



Don't miss making the payment of $10 February 
1st on your two-year-olds entered in the Pacific 
Breeders' $7,000 Futurity. It pays to keep in the 
stakes. 



F. M. Barrows of Walla Walla, Wash., will prob- 
ably take his stallion Del Norte 2:08 to North 
Dakota for the coming stallion season. 



Nancy Hanks 2:04 was foaled in 1S86, consequently 
could vote this year were she a man. 



The California State Fair of 1907 will open Satur- 
day, September 7th and close Saturday, September 
14th. When the State Board of Agriculture gets 
rid of that antequated idea that two Saturdays are 
necessary to a State Fair, they will be able to "hold 
the crowd" better. 



Last year the California State Fair closed Septem- 
ber 1st and the Oregon State Fair opened September 
10th, giving exhibitors at Sacramento a full week 
to reach Salem and get their live stock or other 
exhibits in shape for opening day. This year the 
California State Fair closes September 14th and 
the Oregon Fair opens two days later — the 16th. We 
believe both associations would fare better were 
there more time intervening. 



The Horse Review Futurity Purse has been in- 
creased in value from $10,000 to $12,500, without any 
additional cost to nominators. This is the third 
time the Review has increased the value of this 
excellent stake. $3000 of the money will now go 
to the three-year-old pacers, which is a new fea- 
ture and will make the stake still more popular. 



The State Board of Agriculture will meet at Sacra- 
mento on February 23d, when several matters of 
importance will be discussed and acted upon. 



Sweet Marie 2:02 is to be campaigned again this 
year and every horseman in America will be glad 
to see her reduce her record. 

A bill has been introduced in the California As- 
sembly to license horseshoers. The proposed law pro- 
vides for examination to determine the fitness of 
applicants for the license. It establishes a board 
of examiners to be appointed by the Governor. One 
must be a veterinarian, two master horseshoers 
of five years' experience. The act also requires a 
meeting to be held at least every four months and 
prescribes $1 as a fee to be paid by successful ap- 
plicants before the license is given. This tax will, 
in the opinion of the author, suffice to pay the ex- 
penses of the board and its assistants. Of course, 
the main object of the bill is to provide fat jobs 
for a few politicians, and it should be consigned 
to the waste basket. 



Free Haney of Modesto visited Pleasanton last 

week. 



The Convention to organize a California circuit 
will meet at Pleasanton to-day. 



Hoch der Kaiser! It is stated that Emperor Wil- 
liam of Germany has bought a trotting mare called 
Mabel L., with a trial of 2:10%, for his private 
driver. 



Leonor 2:24, .he dam of Dr. Book 2:10, Jenny 
Mac 2:09 and four others, has a weanling filly by 
McKinney 2:11%, the sire of her two fast ones, and 
is again in foal to mat horse, ^eonor is owned 
by Ramapo Stock Farm, Spring Valley, N. Y. 



John EL Dickerson has decided to winter his string 
of sixteen head at Macon, Georgia. They are all 
owned by the Hillandale Farm of New York. 



Mr. A. L. Dowler of this city is driving on the 
roads one of the nicest all round gentleman's road- 
sters ever seen in San Francisco. 



There are 76 entries in the Occident Stake for 
foals of 1906. This is an increase of ten over the 
previous stake. 



Forty-four colts and fillies, now two-year-olds, have 
been paid up on in the Occident Stake of 1908. 



Just twenty three-year-olds have had third payment 
of $25 each made on them in the Occident Stake to 
be trotted this year at the California State Fair. 



John Mackey, the veteran horse breeder and man- 
ager of the Rancho del Paso, who has been ill for 
several weeks at the Sisters' Hospital in Sacramento, 
is now steadily improving, and it is expected he will 
fully recover. Mr. Mackey was attacked with bronchial 
trouble some time ago and at one time his case was 
considered critical. Reports from the hospital last 
week were to the effect that he is doing nicely. 



The Hudnut Driving Park Association of Bakers- 
field has called for bids for the building of a race 
track on its recently acquired property, and plans 
are on foot for other extensive improvements. A 
grand stand is to be constructed and the park will be 
fenced. It is possible also, that the large, two-story 
house on the property will be made over into a club 
house. The plans of the association are not yet fully 
formed, but it is the intention first to construct one 
of the best half-mile race tracks in the State. Later 
facilities will probably be supplied for holding fairs 
and other entertainments of a similar order. The 
affairs of the association are in the hands of an 
energetic set of men and results may be confidentlly 
expected. 



A. C. Ruby & Co., of Pendleton, Oregon, have sold 
thirty-four Percheron stallions since September 15th, 
at an average price of $3,200. This indicates the kind 
of horses that are going to be raised in eastern Oregon 
from now on . 



At a sale of choice registered Percherons held at 
Sioux City, Iowa, last month, 86 head were disposed 
of at an average of $539.40. Of these 30 were stallions 
that averaged $647.70, and fifty-six mares that made 
an average of 481.50. As the top price of the sale 
was only $1,450, paid for a young stallion by Calypso, 
the prices must have been good throughout. 



Mr. Edwin D. Neff, secretary of the Southern Cali- 
fornia Horse Show Association of Pasadena, writes 
us that the next horse show of this Association will 
be held March 7th, 8th and 9th, this year. 



John Kelly will race a five-year-old brother of 
Directum Kelly 2:08% this year. The young horse 
is a very promising trotter and is owned by James 
Butler of New York. 



Monday, February 11th, is the date set for the 
Combination Sale at Fred H. Chase's pavilion, 478 
Valencia street. Fifty head of high-class horses will 
be sold. 



It is stated that the State Veterinary Board may 
become sponsor for a bill to be introduced in the 
California Legislature that will provide for a law giv- 
ing a veterinarian a lien on the horse he treats to 
secure payment of his fee. Of course, the "vet" 
will see to it that the lien is only filed on those that 
survive the treatment. 



A subscriber asks for the history and breeding 
of a bay pacing mare called Flyer, by Lanark, that 
the late Henry Pierce brought out here from the 
East. Can any of our readers furnish any infor- 
mation about this mare? 

o 

A CURE FOB SPAVIN. 

Mr. John W. Sanner of Pecatur, 111., writes: "I have 
used Quinn's Ointment to remove splints and reduce 
soreness in spavins with very satisfactory results. Re- 
cently I advised a friend to try Quinn's ointment on 
a bad case of spavin and he reports that the horse is 
going sound, this result being produced in two weeks' 
time, being daily used on paved street. This is the 
general verdict of all who have used Quinn's Oint- 
ment. For curbs, splints, spavins, windpuffs and all 
bunches there is nothing better. Price, one dollar per 
bottle. Address W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y., 
If you cannot obtain from druggist. 



Saturday, January 19, 1907.] 



PAYMENTS IN OCCIDENT STAKES. 



Entries Making First Payment of $10 Each in Occi- 
dent Stake of 1909. 



W. O. Bowers' b f by Silver Bee-Sadie Benton. 
Thos. H. Brents' ch c Vincomar by Caution-Saffrona. 

D. L. Bachant's ch f Sadie B. by Athadon-Nugget. 
Geo. T. Becker's blk c High Pride by McKenna- 

Whisper; b or br f Miss Van Zoni by Zombro-Lady 
Van Nuys. 

Elizabeth G. Bonofilo's b c Crescendo by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Atherine. 

Wm. L. Bottom's g c Gen. Vodden by Gen. J. B. 
Frisbie-Dolly K. 

Alex Brown's blk c Nusto by Nushagak-Anselois; 
br f Curlew by Nushagak-Nutflower; gr f Ansela by 
Prince Ansel-Serpolo; b f Decorati by Ansel-Majella 
B.; blk c Nuzan by Nushagak-Zaniia. 

H. Brace's b f Carry G. by Greco-Sadie Moor; blk 
c Cady G. by Greco-Oniska. 

E. O. Burge's b f Princess Flora by Stam B.-Prin- 
cess. 

James Bullock's ch f Grace H. by Hambletonian 
Wilkes-Sallle B. 

Martin Carter's br f Ella M. R. by Lord Alwin- 
Excella. 

S. Christenson's blk f by Strathway-Margaret K. 
S. H. Cowell's s f Zaza by Henry Nutwood-Two 
Minutes. 

Henry Delaney's b c Saxe Pike by Kinney Lou-Mar- 
guerite; b c Lorelock by Zolock-Etta Wilkes. 
M. C. Delano's br f by Marvin Wilkes-Bess. 
W. G. Durfee's br c by Petigru-Maggie McKinney. 
E. D. Dudley's ch c by Palite-Babe. 
Geo. H. Fox's b c by Cresceus-Silpan. 

E. A. Gammon's blk f Nita n. by Zolock-Lily S. 
Mrs. T. B. Gibson's b f Virginia Lee by Iran Alto- 
Maggie. 

F. Gommet's br c by Kinney Lou, by Paloma 
Prince. 

Henry Hahn's ch c Lecket by Lecco-Henrietta. 
Fritz Hahn's b c Goldfleld by Chas. Derby-Nellie 
Emoline. 

E. P. Heald's b f by Tom Smith-Lady Marvin- 
b f by Tom Smith-Nona Washington. 

S. H. Hoy's s f Complete by Palite-Camilla. 

W. H. Hoy's blk f Sal Verne by Jules Verne- 
Director. 

J. B. Iverson's blk c Leccoro by Lecco-Amy I; 
b c Corono by Coronado-Memorita; br c Delnhino bv 
Delphi-Anita I. 

James H. Jack's blk c Cochise by Lecco-Winnie 
Wilkes. 

J. A. Jones' blk f by Capt. McKinney-Daisy Q Hill- 
blk f by Capt. McKinney-Lady Beach; blk c by Capt 
McKinney-Alta Norte. 

A. W. Johnson's b f Alma M. by Murray M-Jet. 

La Siesta Ranch's br f by Coronado-Bessie Wilkes 

Minnie E. Lewis' br f Lillian by Cruzados-Della 
Norte. 

W. S. Maben's b c by Zombro-Mamie Elizabeth. 
R. C. McCormick's br f by Coronado-Jessie Madi- 
son. 

Alf. McLaughlin's b c Tom Fitzgerald by McMyrtle- 
Maggie N. 

E. Z. Miller's b c by Stam Boy-Straightness. 

William Morgan's blk c by Directo-Grace McK- 
b f Cony by Zombro-Connie. 

Chris G. Owen's br f Lou McKinney by Kinney Lou- 
Nancy O. 

E. F. Parker's s c Prince Locke by Zolock-Nolahka 
Dana Perkins' b c Style by Stam B.-Zaza. 

E. D. Roberts' br c Lugo Stanley by On Stanley- 
Colton Maid. 

Charles Silva's br c Coronado-Sister to Eleta- b f 
by Stam B.-Swift Bird; b c by Coronado-Queen S 
Thomas Smith's blk c by Gen. J. B. Frisbie-Rimette 
N. M. Strong's b c by Ben Zee-May Kinney 
John Suglian's b c King Kohlan by Kohlan King- 
Clytie. 

L. H. Todhunter's b c by Zombro-The Silver Bell- 
b f by Zombro-Laura B. 

J. H. Torrey's b f Grade T. by Zombro-Manilla 
Tuttle Bros.' b c by McKena-Bell Carter. 

F. W. Wadham's br or blk f Zulu Belle by Petigru- 
Johanah Treat. 

Geo. D. Warlow's blk c by Stanford McKinney- 
btrathahe; s c by Stanford McKinney-Sextette- b c 
by Athadon-Bessie; br c by Robert Direct-Corad'on 
Mr Wheeler ' s D f by Marvin Wilkes-Queen of the 

C. Whitehead's b f by Delphi-Mina B. 

C. H. Williams' br f by Unimak-Alta Nola; blk 
f by Nutwood Wilkes-Twenty-Thh d . 

P. J. Williams' blk c The Major by Monterey-Leap 
Year. 

Chas. W. Winter's b c Alarich by Direcho-Patti 
McKinney. 

S. B. Wright's b c Lynwood Patchen by Lynwood 
W.-Maud Patchen. 

J. W. Zibbell's b c Eddie G. by Tom Smith-Kate 
Lumry . 



Entries Making Second Payment of $15 Each in Occi- 
dent Stake of 1908. 



W. O. Bower's ch f Betty Direct by I Direct-Betsey 

B. 

I. L. Borden's ch f Juliet B. by Monterey-La Belle 
Almont; ch c Belvoir by Monterey-Alice Almont; 
b f Ramona by Prince Robert-Allie Cresco. 

Alex Brown's Nusago br c by Nushagak-Addie B.; 
gr c Nupolo by Nushagak-Serpolo; b c Anjella by 
Prince Ansel-Majella B. 

Martin Carter's ch c by Kinney Lou-Queen C; be 
Directum II.-Muriel P. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



S. Christenson's b f by Stam B.-Perza. 
S. F. Coram's ch f Kesrina by Nutwood Wilkes- 
Petrina. 

Geo. A. Cressey's b c Chas. Derby-Elise. 
C. H. Durfee's blk c Dr. Lecco by I^ecco-Bessie D. 
A. Morris Fosdick's b f Lulu K. by Kinney Lou- 
Athene. 

Henry Hahn's b f Alameda by Stam B.-Henrietta. 

Fritz Hahn's blk c by Chas. Derby-Xellie Emoline. 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hasting's br c California Boy by Coro- 
nado-Lady Gossiper. 

C. Z. Hebert's br c Delphi-Altoonita. 

S. H. Hoy's b f Julia by Jules Verne-Beatrice. 

W. H. Hoy's blk c Jules by Jules Verne-Camilla. 

J. B. Iverson's b c Ernest S. by Scott McKinney- 
Amy I.; b c Starlight by Searchlight-Anita I. 

Rudolf Jordan Jr.'s b c El Pronto by Stam B.-Con- 
stancia. 

J. A. Jones' blk f Sacajawea by Capt. Jones-Lady 
Beach; blk c General Jones by Capt. Jones-Daisy Q. 
Hill; blk f Alta Jones by Capt. Jones-Alta Norte. 

Geo. A. Kelly's br c Bonkin by Bonnie McK.-Van- 
trim. 

La Siesta Ranch's b c Siesta by Iran Alto-Wanda. 
Lou Mativa's b c Jules V. by Jules Verne-Sophia. 
W. S. Maben's blk c Admiral Togo by Petigru-Dixie 
W. 

W. H. Meek's b or br c by Kinney Lou-Cricket; 
b f by Stam B.-Isobel. 

R. C. McCormick's b f by Petigru- Jessie Madison. 

Fred H. Perkins' br s Mirvin W. by Wayland W.- 
Miss Leah. 

E. D. Robert's b c Arrow Stanley by On Stanley- 
Emoline. 

E. E. Sherwood's b f Daisy Z. by Zombro-Queen 
Woolsey. 

J. H. Torrey's br f Bessie T. by Zombro-Manilla. 
Valencia Stock Farm's br c by Direct Heir-La Belle. 
Mrs. Chas. Whitehead's br f Miss Delphi by Delphi- 
The Mrs. 

R. P. Wilson's blk c Benton Boul by Peter J.- 
Little Dot. 

J. W. Zibbell's b f Katalina by Tom Smith-Kate 
Lumry. 

W. G. Durfee's b c by Coronado-Lulu Wilkes. 
Chas. Silva's b c by Stam B.-Swift Bird. 
Byron Erkenbrecher's b f by Electro McKinney- 
Wilhelmina. 



Entries Making Third Payment of $25 Each in Occi- 
dent Stake of 1907. 



Thos. H. Brent's b f Reina del Norte by Del Norte- 
Laurelia. 

Alex Brown's b f Nocha by Nushagak-Pioche; b f 
The Bloom by Nushagak-Redflower; b c Harold M. 
by Prince Ansel-Mamie Martin. 

W. O. Bowers* ch c W. O. B. by Silver Bee-Sadie 
Benton. 

Christenson & Thompson's br f Beauty Patch by 
Bonnie Direct-Perza 

W. G. Durfee's ch f Irene S. by Petigru- Johanah 
Treat. 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings' blk f Lady H. by Coro- 
nado-Lady Gossiper. 

E. A. Gammon's b c Ed Geers by Bayswater Wilkes- 
Urana. 

E. P. Heald's blk c Tommy Murphy by Monterey- 
Honor. 

Fred Wadham's b c Enole by Petigru-Juliet D. 

F. Hahn's blk f Gold Leaf by Chas. Derby-Nellie 
Emoline. 

J. A. Jones' blk c Chehalem by Capt. Jones-Daisy 
Q. Hill. 

La Siesta Ranch's b c Mogplore by Iran Alto-Lady 
Belle Isle. 

M. A. Murphy's b f Ina J. by Zombro-Nellie Bly. 

Thos. Smith's b f Marguerite Hunt by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Daisy S. 

S. Siljan's b f Martha H. by Iran Alto-Idabelle. 

Dr. J. J. Summerfleld's b c Lord Dillon by Sidney 
Dillon-Roblet. 

J. W. Zibbell's b c Teddy Mc by Tom Smith-Kate 
Lumry. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b c General Nogi by Athablo-Cora 
Wickersham. 

o 

The trend of public opinion regarding the impor- 
tance which the horse department should be given 
in the makeup of State fair programs, is hsown by a 
dispatch from Des Moines, Iowa, which says: "At 
the meeting of the directors of the Department of 
Agriculture, last week, it was voted to add $2,500 to 
the premiums in the horse department. This makes 
the total amount of premiums in that, department 
more than any other State or inter-State fair or 
exposition, with the exception of one. It places the 
horse department on a par with the best, raising 
it from secondary position in the fair departments. 
For some years the horse department has had sec- 
ondary place, cattle and hogs being given much more 
prominence. Coach and carriaye horses, and mules, 
will be added to the department and made of some 
consequence, while all the classes of horses will be 
offered large premiums." This action on the part 
of the Iowa State Fair managers is in line with 
what has been done in many other States during 
the last few years. Wherever the horse department 
has been made a big feature of a State fair the 
results have been so pleasing that a proposition to 
make that department of less importance would be 
defeated unanimously. — Horse World. 



It is reported that George Webb was offered an 
advance of $6,000 upon the price paid for Sweet 
Marie 2:02 before he shipped her from the Garden. 



7 



THE ANTI-BETTING BILL. 

Following is the full text of the bill introduced 
in the California Legislature by Eshelmann of Ala- 
meda county, and over which a hard fight is ex- 
pected. A careful reading of the bill shows that 
horse racing is the only sort of contest on which it 
prohibits betting. As Eshelmann hails from the 
university town of Berkeley it may be more than 
accident that betting on football and other athletic 
contests is not placed under the ban, although it 
is known that many thousands of dollars are lost 
and won every year by students who bet on the 
college games: 

Assembly bill 337— Section 1: Every person who, 
within the State of California, for himself or as 
an agent for, or employe of any person or persons, 
firm, company or corporation, sells or offers for 
sale, buys or okers to buy, issues or offers to issue, 
or in any manner, whether by agent or otherwise, 
disposes of, purchases or acquires any interest in 
any pool or any pool-ticket, certificate, writing or 
other evidence of payment, acceptance or deposit 
of money, or other thing or things of value staked 
upon the result of any running, pacing or trotting 
race or contest between horses, mares or geldings, 
or makes or offers to make any bet or wager laid 
on the result of such race or contest, or receives 
or pays over any money, or article of value, the 
ownership or right to possession of which has been, 
is, or is to be determined by any such race or con- 
test, or rents or leases any building or premises 
whatever or permits the same to be used or occu- 
pied for any of the above purposes, is guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall 
be punished by a fine of not less than one hundred 
dollars nor more than one thousand dollars, or by 
imprisonment in the county jail not exceeding one 
year, or by both such fine and imprisonment, for 
each and every offense. 

Section 2: This act shall take effect immediately. 
o 

Mr. J. B. Haggin of Elmendorf has consigned his 
entire trotting stud for sale at Lexington during the 
week of February 11-16. The stud numbers about 
150 head, and included therein are the five young 
stars, Dan Cupid 2:09%, Knight 2:23y 2 (sire of Ana- 
conda 2:01%), Worthier, Adbine and Philario. The 
latter, three of the highest bred young horses in the 
country. 



Hon. Geo. W. Hendee, ex-Governor of Vermont, 
died at his home in Morrisville, that State, on the 
6th inst, aged 84. He was a great lover of good 
horses, and at times had owned some of the fastest 
trotters in that State. He was an admirer of beauty 
as well as speed, and a great friend of the Lamberts. 



According to a statistician the Fasig-Tipton Com- 
pany sales for the last ten years total upwards of 
$7,000,000. 



The third volume of the American Hackney Stud 
Book is in press and will be published this month, 
according to A. H. Godfrey, secretary of the Hackney 
Breeders' Association. It will carry the total num- 
ber of stallions registered up to about 5,000 and of 
mares to something like 10,000. Interest in the high 
stepping English harness horses is evidently on the 
increase, more having been imported and recorded 
this year than for a long time past. 



C. M. Griggs of St. Paul, vice president of the Min- 
nesota State Fair Association and superintendent of 
the speed department, is arranging to have the finishes 
taken next year with the moving picture camera. This 
he claims will be the simplest and most, accurate of 
all, as the machine can be focused on the wire and 
overy horse in the race, or at least those that pass 
during three or four seconds' duration, will show just 
where they finished, thus giving all their correct 
positions, as well as the winner. The only objection 
to the innovation will be the time it takes to develop 
the films — at least twenty minutes — but perhaps it 
would be well to wait that length of time where the 
finish is close, more especially when rich purses are 
involved. 

o 

TO THE "AIR CUSHION" FADS. 

When your eyes meet the "ad." of those "Air Cush- 
ion" Pads, 

You'll be glad as a matter of course; 
For you'll see there and then what appeals to all men, 

Who have any respect for their horse. 

Though the S. P. C. A. do the best in their way 
To put down all that's cruel and bail; 

They can't save the poor brute on a slippery route, 
But you can, with those "Air Cushion" Pads. 

It would make your heart bleed, to see some broken- 
kneed, 

Dumb and helpless, though plucky old "prads"; 
At Die traces in vain, struggle and strain 

For tho want of those "Air Cushion" Pads. 

When you see your good horse, goaded on by brute 
force, 

Often by inexperienced lads; 
When he can't keep his feet 

On the slippery, wet streets. 
For Humanity's sake — get those pads. 
— From a Trover of the Horse, 

New York, November 23d, 1900. 

O 

TO CURE A COLD IN ONE DAY 
Take lyAX ATI VK BROMO Quinine Tablets. Drug- 
gists refund money if It falls to cure. E. W. GROVE'S 
signature is on each box. 25c. 



s 



T&ri BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, Janu ary 19. it>07. 



CHANGING THE STANDARD RULES. 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman: The annual meet- 
ing of the stockholders and directors of the American 
Trotting Association take place in Chicago February 
7th, when some changes to the standard rules will 
be submitted. There is one rule that will come 
up for consideration that certainly ought to be 
adopted, and that is the rule that will admit a 
horse or mare to standard rank which has shown its 
ability to produce speed at both the trotting and 
pacing gait. As the rule stands now a mare that is 
the dam of a 2:05 trotter and also a 2:05 pacer, sired 
by a standard horse, and whose first and second 
dams were sired by standard horses, is not eligible 
to registration, while the same mare if her dam was 
a Clydesdale could be registered, providing she pro- 
duced either two 2:30 trotters or two 2:25 pacers. 
The absurdity of the situation is apparent. 

The contention is that the gaits are separated 
under the standard rules with a view to producing 
a true type of standard bred trotter and a true type 
of standard bred pacer. Experience, as far as it 
goes, has taught us that such a thing is an impossi- 
bility, as thousands of illustrations amply attest. 
Yet this contention is not backed up by the Registry 
officials themselves, for in Rule 6 of the pacing 
standard they admit the progeny of a registered trot- 
ting horse out of a registered standard pacing mare 
and vice versa. 

A stallion or mare should be eligible to register 
if he or she has produced "standard" speed, pro- 
vided they conform to the rules otherwise; that is 
2:25 pacing and 2:30 trotting should be treated on 
equality. 

In our experience of compiling catalogues and 
stallion cards we have come across hundreds of 
cases where injury has been wrought owing to 
the lack of this rule, and I would ask all these as 
well as others interested to write me, and I will take 
pleasure in laying their communications before the 
board of directors, who I feel certain will give the 
subject favorable consideration if they find that the 
majority of the breeders approve. 

Another thing, the States of Wisconsin and Iowa 
have adopted stallion laws, which require all stal- 
lions to be recorded with the Secretary of Agricul- 
ture, and other States are rapidly following their 
example, so that we have the additional hardship 
of a stallion conforming to the condition I have al- 
ready outlined, that is, sires of speed and out of 
speed producing dams, which have to be recorded 
under the law under the degrading title of "grade" 
stallions, while some nondescript who is neither 
bred from producing lines nor shown the ability 
to sire speed are reported as "pure bred." Either 
air your grievances in these columns at once or 
send same to me, as with proper agitation I believe 
the change in the rule will win out. 

Personally, I do not think these should be any 
rules, save that the animal have a certain number 
of trotting or pacing crosses. The Year Book is 
the "standard" and also believes every horse should 
be registered before he is allowed to compete in a 
race. This would make the keeping of records and 
statistics simple and practically make "ringing" im- 
possible. 

MAGNUS FLAWS. 
Chicago, 111., January 10, 1907. 



The rules for registration as now in force are as 
follows: 

The Trotting Standard. 

In order to define what constitutes a standard bred 
trotting horse and to establish a breed of trotters 
on a more intelligent basis the following rules are 
adopted to control admission to registration. When 
an animal meets the requirements of admission and 
is duly registered it shall be accepted as a standard 
bred trotting animal. 

1. The progeny of a registered standard trotting 
horse and a registered standard trotting mare. 

2. A stallion sired by a registered standard trot- 
ting horse, provided his dam and grandam were sired 
by registered standard trotting horses and he himself 
has a trotting record of 2:30 and is the sire of three 
trotters with records of 2:30 from different mares. 

3. A mare whose sire is a registered standard 
trotting horse and whose dam and grandam were 
sired by registered standard trotting horses, provided 
she herself has a trotting record of 2:30 or is the 
dam of one trotter with a record of 2:30. 

4. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting 
horse, provided she is the dam of two trotters with 
records of 2:30. 

5. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting 
horse, provided her first, second and third dams are 
each sired by a registered standard trotting horse. 

The Pacing Standard. 
In order to define what constitutes a standard 
bred pacing horse and to establish a breed of pacers 
on a more intelligent basis the following rules are 
adopted to control admission to registration. When 
an animal meets the requirements of admission and 
is duly registered, it shall be accepted as a standard 
bred pacing animal. 

1. -The progeny of a registered standard pacing 
horse and a registered standard pacing mare. 

2. A stallion sired by a registered standard pac- 
ing horse, providing his dam and grandam were sired 
by registered standard pacing horses, and he him- 
self has a pacing record of 2:25 and is the sire of 
three pacers with records of 2:25 from different 
mares. 

3. A mare whose sire is a registered standard 
pacing horse and whose dam and grandam were sired 
by registered standard pacing horses, provided she 



herself has a pacing record of 2:25 or is the dam of 
one pacer with a record of 2:25. 

4. A mare sired by a registered standard pacing 
horse, provided she is the dam of two pacers with 
records of 2:25. 

5. A mare sired by a registered standard pacing 
horse, provided her first, second and third dams are 
each sired by a registered standard pacing horse. 

6. The progeny of a registered standard trotting 
horse out of a registered standard pacing mare or of 
a registered standard pacing horse out of a regis- 
tered standard trotting mare. 

o 

MATINEE AT PHOENIX. 



[Phoenix Republican.] 

Decidedly not commensurate with the quality of 
the races offered was the crowd which attended 
the matinee of races held at the Phoenix Fair 
Grounds, Saturday afternoon, January 5th. The 
matinee had been planned for New Year's day, but 
at that time it had to be postponed on account of 
the inclemency of the weather. The races began 
at 1:30 sharp and were heat by heat, disposed of 
so that there no tiresome delays. The prizes were 
small articles of value principally to horsemen, but 
notwithstanding this fact, they were in several in- 
stances hotly contested for. 

There were three entries in the first race, a mile 
trot, best two in three, Major, owned by J. K. 
Wheat; Col. Randolph, owned by J. C. Adams, and 
Near McKinnoy, owned by C. F. Mickens. In both 
of the heats the horses finished in the order named, 
the time of the first heat being 2:26 and the second 
heat 2:25%. 

In point of interest the second race was the feature 
of the afternoon. The entries were J. M. Jr., a 
horse J. C. Adams bought on his trip East last sum- 
mer and two horses of the W. C. Greene string, Bor- 
alma's Brother, and Jessie McKinney. The race 
was won by J. M. Jr., who took the second and 
third heats and finished second in the first heat. 
Boralma's Brother finished third in the first and 
second heats and second in the last heat. Jessie 
McKinney won the first heat, finished second in the 
second heat and third in the last heat. In the sec- 
ond heat Jessie McKinney made a sensational finish 
and came near winning the heat At the start of the 
heat the mare broke and at the first quarter was 
fully six lengths behind the other two entries. She 
finally regained her pace and gradually worked her 
way forward until in the stretch it was apparent 
to all if she could maintain her speed she would 
take the heat. Her spurt evidently got the best of 
her, for but a length from the wire and but a 
nose behind J. M. Jr. she went up in the air and 
lost her chance The time of the first heat was 
2:15, second 2:17%, third 2:17. 

In the third race, a mile pace, there were two 
entries. Tommy Lawson, owned and driven by J. 
K. Wheat, and Prize Oh So, owned by W. W. Cook, 
and driven by Mickens. Tommy Lawson took two 
straight heats, the first in 2:23% and the second in 
2:29%. Prize Oh So made a bad break on the home 
stretch in the second heat. 

The fourth race was a half-mile event for trot- 
ting colts. There were four entries — Miss Russell, 
owned by S. L. Easterling; Lady Russell, owned by 
Fen Hildrem; Punch the Breeze, owned by Walter 
Norris, and Del So, owned by A. H. Davidson. Punch 
the Breeze took both heats, Miss Russell took two 
seconds, Del So two thirds, and Lady Russell two 
fourths. Punch the Breeze was out of his class, the 
other horses being two-year-olds, while Punch has 
appeared in older company several years ago. 

The final event of the day was a quarter-mile run- 
ning race. There were five entries — Craps, Willie 
Campbell, Cap, Peggy and Willie C. The race was 
won by Willie C. in 0:26, Cap second and Craps 



third. The summaries: 

First race; trotting — 

Major (W. K. Wheat) 1 1 

Col. Randolph (J. C. Adams) 2 2 

Near McKinney (C. F. Mickens) 3 3 

Time— 2:26, 2:25%, 

Second race; trotting — 

J. M. Jr. (J. C. Adams) 2 1 1 

Jessie McKinney (W. C. Greene) 1 2 3 

Boralma's Brother (W. C. Greene) 3 2 2 

Time— 2:15, 2:17%, 2:17. 

Third race; pacing — 

Tommv Lawson (W. K. Wheat) 1 1 

Prize Oh So (W. W. Cook) 2 2 

Time— 2:23%, 2:29%. 

Fourth race; trotting; half-mile heats — 

Punch the Breeze (Walter Norris) 1 1 

Miss Russell (S. L. Easterling) 2 2 

Del Oh So (Alex Davidson) 3 3 

Lady Russell (F. S. Hildreth) 4 4 

Time— 1:24, 1:18. 



o 

JEROME IS AFTER THE BOOKMAKERS. 



New York, Jan. 13. — District Attorney Jerome has 
begun a campaign to eliminate betting on horse 
races in this State. He will go to Albany to-morrow 
and ask the Legislature to repeal certain sections 
of the Percy-Gray law. In one bill he seeks to de- 
liver a death blow to that section which says that 
the only penalty for bookmaking at the track shall 
be the recovery of the bet by a civil suit. In another 
er bill he proposes to amend the Penal Code so as 
to make bookmaking at a race track, or any other 
place, a felony instead of a misdemeanor, the pun- 
ishment to be not more than one year in the peni- 
tentiary or a fine of $500, or both. 



STREET CONSTRUCTION. 

An ideal pavement, one that will make the hauling 
of heavy loads easy, furnish a sure and safe footing 
for horses in both dry and wet weather, be com- 
paratively noiseless and the most economical to 
maintain, has been sought for ages, but as yet has 
not been found. A writer in the Rider and Driver, 
in an article discussing street construction in New 
York, has furnished some very interesting data in 
regard to street paving in that city, and from this 
article we have made the following extracts, which 
we think will be of interest to San Franciscans, as 
there are many miles of streets to be re-paved here 
during the next few years. The use of wood blocks 
for paving has not met with favor here, probably 
owing to the fact that redwod and pine were the 
woods used, both being unsuitable, as they do not 
stand the wear of the heavy teaming. As eucalyptus 
or Australian gum has proven a good paving wood 
in New York, it should do well here, and there is a 
great deal of this timber growing in California. The 
Rider and Driver article follows in part: 

There are before the public three forms of street 
construction in this city at the present time; the 
granite or brick blocks, asphalt, and wood blocks; 
the inorganic blocks when dry are, though dusty, 
fairly satisfactory to the motorist, and when wet are 
somewhat less slipery than asphalt, but. of course, 
their hardness and want of resilience make them an 
abomination to the horseman; moreover, they lack 
one very important adjunct, silence; in asphalt, es- 
pecially as it is laid here, it is difficult to find one 
redeeming feature; the effect of it on horse's hoofs 
in the summer, when it is soft and hot, and on their 
joints when it is hard, are too well known to horse 
owners to need detailed recapitulation here, while 
its greasiness when damp, and its immediate trans- 
formation into a skating rink with the least touch 
of supervening frost, make it equally objectionable 
to the motorist and the horseman; in wet weather 
too, the asphalt streets are a series of lagoons round 
which pedestrians try vainly to find a dry path, the 
monotony being relieved only by the presence along 
the car lines of holes from two to six feet in length, 
as much as two feet wide, and having a depth any- 
w..ere between three and six inches; the life of these 
holes attains a period of as much as nine or ten 
months. When from numerous and ever present 
causes the asphalt pavement is dug up. the road is 
hastily remade by leaving the granite blocks which 
form the foundation projecting unevenly and in- 
securely an inch or two above the surface, and it is 
weeks, sometimes months, before this condition of 
things is remedied. The only thing that can be said 
in favor of asphalt is that it is comparatively silent, 
but even in this it is vastly inferior to wood blocks. 

That wood block pavement makes the ideal street 
in large cities is no longer open to question; for 
years all the large cities of Europe have been gradu- 
ally discarding and removing all other forms of road 
structure. The wood pavement is clean, noiseless, 
resilient to horses' feet, is not slippery when either 
wet or dry, and though when damp it tends to be- 
come greasy in a city like London, where the deposit 
of soot from the combustion of soft coal forms a 
peculiarly emoli.ent mud, it is less so than asphalt, 
as is shown by the popularity it has attained in 
lower Broadway, while the slipperiness is more easily 
overcome by the judicious sprinkling of a 
little sand or fine gravel. In spite of the initial cost 
of laving where substituted for macadam, involving 
the expense of a three-inch foundation of concrete, 
the London City Council has found wood pavement 
the most economical to maintain, three-quarters of 
an inch of surface abrasion in nine years being the 
average wear given by one authority, while there 
are streets which have not been disturbed for 16 
years. 

Think of that, ye dwellers in New York! 

When repairs are necessary, or the road is taken 
up to obtain access to buried pipes, the surface can, 
and from the nature of the construction, must be 
permanently completed at once, all signs of the ex- 
cavation being promptly and effectually effaced. 

That wood pavement is acceptable to horse own- 
ers was again demonstrated recently in London, when 
the local authorities, before relaying an old street, 
presumably macadam, took a vote of the business 
firms in the district whose wagons and other vehicles 
were most affected; the figures, given from memory, 
were something like this: For wood blocks over 70 
per cent; for granite, 14, and for asphalt, 2. 

To be successful, however, wood pavement must 
be properly laid, the foundation good, the grouting 
through, the pickling of the blocks effective to the 
core, and the wood itself of suitable nature. 

Beech was the first wood to prove satisfactory, 
but the price soon became prohibitive. Australian 
red gum is now generally employed and is conceded 
to give good results. One important feature in the 
laying of wood pavement, which has unfortunately 
been neglected in lower Broadway, is the placing 
of the blocks diagonally across the road so that 
the longitudal intersecting lines are not at right 
angles to the curb and to the direction of the traffic; 
neglect of this precaution materially shortens the 
ife of the pavement, as the shoes of the horses cut 
out the edges of the blocks much more quickly when 
crossing them at right angles than diagonally. As 
the wood block pavement is by way of an experiment 
in this city, this defect should be eliminated in the 
next section laid. 

o 

Your stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's Napa 
Soda. 



Saturday, January 19, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



STORIES OF THE CHAMPIONS. 



[Henry Ten Eyck White in Christmas Horse World.] 



Stories of the champions among men or horses 
have an undying interest, principally for the reason 
that much is to he learned from them. The lives 
of great men teach, in illuminated letters, the lesson 
of success, and similarly the facts ahout the per- 
sonality, the likes and dislikes, of record breaking 
horses unerringly indicate the road that must be 
traveled by the best ones of the days to come. 

In the trotting world 2:20 was the first great 
dividing line between the champions and the lesser 
lights, and from that autumn day in 1S59 when the 
bobtail mare Flora Temple, hitched, almost farmer 
fashion, to a high-wheel 75-pound spring sulky that 
in these days wouiu be considered too crude to 
jog colts in, stepped the Kalamazoo track in 2:19%, 
until the balmy afternoon, almost exactly forty-four 
years later, when Lou Dillon, over the perfectly ap- 
pointed and velvety course at Memphis, back of a 
runner with a wind shield hanging low from the cart 
he drew, the trotter pulling a sulky of less than forty 
pounds weight, put 1:58^ on the books, the chief and 
overwhelming characteristic of every champion trot- 
ter has been an indomitable will — an overwhelming 
nerve force and courage without which the animal 
would be a mere plodder in the harness, a common 
ordinary horse. 

For it is now universally acknowledged that it is 
nerve force that makes horses go fast — in other 
words, that "the trot is in the head." That the form 
of fast horses has nothing at all to do with their 
speed was long ago made clear, even to those of 
dimmest vision when each season"s racing showed 
fast horses, high class race nags too, of all shapes 
and sizes. Gloster, over 17 hands high, was the 
fastest trotting gelding when he died, and had he 
lived but another season or two it is more than prob- 
able he would have been the champion trotter. Jay 
Eye See, the first to trot in 2:10, is a pony in size. 
That tells the whole story. Big and little, high 
headed by nature, as with Lou Dillon, low headed by 
nature as with Cresceus (the two greatest trotters 
ever seen) ; one world beater made to order over 
the hips and another cat-hammed. One great pacer 
perfect in conformation and especially a model as 
to fore legs, and then Robert J. — born knee-sprung. 

No, nerve force makes each and every great trot- 
ter what .he is, and nothing but nerve force. Hence, 
and inevitably, all great horses have other impelling 
ideas aside from that of going fast, which is the one 
that makes them famous. It is so far back to the 
days of Flora Temple that her personal characteris- 
tics have not been recorded, but her successor among 
mares, Goldsmith Maid, was a character. Why, the 
very fact and circumstance of her sale to Alden 
Goldsmith, whose name she bore for the rest of her 
life, came about through her willfulness, she giving 
"Jersey Bill," her owner, such a lively time on the 
street of a New York village that, having finally 
tied the vixenish little mare to a stout post, Bill 
swore a resounding oath that he would never untie 
her again — that another owner should have that 
privilege, no matter how small the price she brought. 
Jumping the pasture fence and taking wild night 
rambles across the country had been the mare's only 
way of showing her independence and fearlessness 
before this, but even at her wildest she would allow 
the boys at Decker's farm to catch her at night and 
run races with her down the moonlit lanes. Use for 
speed she seemed to comprehend and approve, but 
having a wagon rattling at her heels was another 
matter. 

Budd Doble who drove Goldsmith Maid from 1867, 
when she was only a trifle better than a 2:35 trot- 
ter for the full mile, never tires of talking of the 
mare's intelligence. He was hardly more than a 
boy when asked to take her in hand, but he had 
just driven Dexter to the world's trotting record, 
2: 17%. In almost the same mail that brought the 
letter from Alden Goldsmith proposing that Doble 
should train and drive the Maid came one from the 
owner of Lucy making a similar proposition. Now 
Lucy had a record of 2:28 and was known to be one 
of the fastest trotters in the land. Doble could not at 
that time take both mares — that he knew — and under 
like conditions most young men would have plumped 
for the one known to be considerably the faster 
of the two. But not Doble. He had seen Goldsmith 
Maid in a race that summer and had noted that al- 
though in a general way she was, while not a rough 
gaited trotter, inclined to hitch a good deal, there 
were times when she went perfectly pure gaited, 
and that in those moments she showed a flight of 
speed that made her look to him like a coming 
champion. So after thinking the matter over very 
carefully he accepted Mr. Goldsmith's proposition and 
declined the other. Incidentally it may be said that 
suDsequently he had Lucy in his stable and gave her 
a record of 2:22%, after which she went to Orrin 
Hickok and took a mark of 2:18%, the trick being 
done, by the way, in a $10,000 race at Buffalo in 
1872, that the Maid could not win, she being third 
at the finish to Lucy and American Girl. 

In all the years that Doble and the Maid were 
partners the mare showed intelligence, and the 
crankisms that mean nerve force and brain power. 
To begin with, she always declined to go fast when 
training began. If she had been cursed with a driver 
looking for a fast quarter in April he would have 
been fooled, because she made speed only as her 
condition warranted. After she was a champion it 
was the same. Also she was no. glutton, and while 
always a good feeder, knew when she had enough, 
although in the matter of hay she required more 



than any fast trotter ever known. On race days 
she was jogged three miles in the morning, stepped 
through the stretch until she struck a gait that 
pleased Doble. She would get a light feed of hay 
after this work, and was ready to go out and race. 
But the evening before race day: that was when 
the hay disappeared. There would be a big pile 
of it put in her stall — half as much again as you 
would allow a 16-hand horse that was a heavy feeder 
— and in the morning every wisp of it would be 
gone. 

The Maid knew when it was race day. After the 
light feed of hay she would be haltered to prevent 
her eating more, but even after her was up she 
would be contented enough until the early part 
of the afternoon, and then she would become very 
nervous and plunge around the stall. Then it was 
time to hitch her, but there was no diminution of the 
"spell." She would tremble all over while being 
hitched to the sulky, until, as Doble once told mo, 
"I have heard her feet make the same noise against 
the hard ground that a person's teeth will when the 
body is suddenly chilled — that is, her feet actually 
chattered on the ground." And the same intelligence 
and high nervous force was plain in other depart- 
ments of her life — in her treatment of "Old Charlie," 
who for one period of five years spent but two nights 
out of her stall; in her manners during a race, her 
eagerness to get the pole, and to score ahead of 
the other horses, and finally, when, a broodmare; 
with her first colt by her side, she saw "Old Charlie" 
after a lapse of years, and permitted him to fondle 
her foal where all the farm attendants had been 
driven away and their lives put in peril, until finally 
Doble, talking of it, said to me: "This faculty of 
remembering things and of actually seeming to draw 
conclusions for herself, the Maid possessed in a 
greater degree than any other horse I ever saw." 

Dexter, that preceded the Maid as champion trot- 
ter, had views on every subject in his horizon, and 
he expressed them forcibly and intelligently. "He 
was the most nervous horse I ever handled when 
he was in the stable or was being hitched," said 
Doble. But in a race the nervousness and the peev- 
ishness were gone. At such times he was like a 
general in command and there never was a safer 
horse in a race, or a more reliable one. That was 
the one and only time that Dexter would tolerate 
Doble as a driver — when there was racing. For the 
jogging work that in those days was such a feature 
of training it was his rubber, Peter Conover, 
for Dexter, or else a pulling match with whoever 
else undertook to drive him, and a nerve-worn, 
fidgety horse at the end of the exercise that other- 
wise would have been beneficial. Dexter was a 
vicious horse when he met anyone that was afraid 
of him, and he always tested matters by making a 
horrible bluff. When he came at a man, his ears 
laid back and the whites of his eyes showing, there 
was apt to be a retreat. I know there was when I 
made his acquaintance in his box in Robert Bon- 
ner's barn, the horse being then over 20 years 
old 

Rarus was a hero when he lowered the Maid's 
record of 2:14, and the romance of his history added 
to his hold on the public. Bred by a man who made 
no professions in the art of mingling blood lines; 
sired by a stallion of absolutely unknown lineage, 
and having for his dam a mare, not of trotting line- 
age, that never produced another trotter, the big 
gangling bay colt was regarded from the first by 
his breeder and owner as a coming champion. And 
when the great day came and Rarus stood above all 
other trotters in achievements, there was many a 
tale to tell of the horse's peculiarities. 

For instance: Until Rarus reached the zenith of 
his career he had no use for- dogs. In fact he was 
never an affectionate horse and up to that time had 
never seemed to have the slightest affection for any 
human being except his owner and Dave Colross, 
who cared for him. When a Scotch terrier pup was 
given to Splan, Colross made application for it at 
once, claiming that a horse, especially a nervous one, 
was less fussy in the stall with a dog on hand than 
if left alone. Now Splan knew Rarus better than 
Dave did. He had seen the horse make the fur 
fly from a few dogs that had got in his way, and he 
especially cautioned Colross to be careful. In a few 
days he was amazed to hear that the horse and the 
dog were great friends, and from that day until 
Rarus was sold to Mr. Bonner they were never sep- 
arated for an hour, except once, when Rarus was 
taken alone to the blacksmith shop, both making 
such a tremendous fuss on that occasion that it was 
decided not to repeat the experiment. By getting 
on the horse's back while Rarus way lying down 
the dog taught himself to do the trick of mounting 
when Rarus was on his feet, provided one of the 
stable boys would help by bending his back so the 
dog could jump on it from the ground, and thence 
leap to the horse's haunches, where he would stand 
and bark loudly to call attention to his own smart- 
ness. Perhaps some one can explain why Rarus 
liked that dog, after hating the canine tribe the 
better part of his life, or some other ground than 
intelligence!, but I doubt it. 

St. Julien, in addition to being a champion trotter, 
was also the champion mean horse when he wanted 
to be. When Orrin Hickok got the gelding he had 
a record of 2:22%. Taken to California in the win- 
ter, it was expected he would be a great trotter the 
following summer, but he developed stubbornness 
that nothing but long, hard driving would cure. It 
took Hickok two solid years to make St. Julien a real 
trotter with the manners a champion must have, and 
day after day he was driven from 40 to 60 miles on 
the track or road before he would submit to being 
trained in the orthodox way. "St. Julien Bill," who 



was killed by a railroad train in California not long 
ago, was the sole and only human being for whom 
the horse ever manifested the slightest affection, and 
he showed it plainly after his racing days were over 
and he was taken by "Bill" and Hickok to the big 
Morrow ranch to be turned out for the balance of 
his life. The old fellow seemed to know something 
was wrong and that he was to lose his friend, and 
when the halter was slipped from his head and the 
men turned to go he galloped to the gate and stood 
whinnying pitifully until they passed from his sight. 
Hickok told me that story one day when his own 
obscuration of intellect and sad death was not far 
away, and his voice broke as he pictured the scene. 
"We could have got $2,00p for the old fellow," he 
said, "but neither Mr. Morrow or myself wanted 
that sort of money. Julien had been a good horse 
for us, and we decided that in his old age he should 
not be hammered around over obscure tracks, his 
speed gone, and his body suffering for the care he 
had always had." Hickok was far from a sentimental- 
ist in the matter of horses, but St. Julien was ever 
on a pedestal, far above all other horses, in his 
mind. 

Maud S. came much nearer to making herself 
champion trotter than did any other horse ever in 
that niche of fame, because her speed was natural, 
her gait pure and she needed little training. "They 
rub her on tne nose and feed her red apples," was 
the report made by a scout set to watch a once 
famous race mare of the running turf by an owner 
who wondered how she could put up such wonderful 
races and not get the severe work that in those 
days was considered essential to the conditioning 
of any sort of race nag. It was a good deal that 
way with Maud S., but aside from that she needed 
a lot of petting and also to have her own way. Billy 
Blair found her a willful filly and he treated her 
with kindness and consideration because that was 
the only way to get along with her. Then Maud did 
the rest. That her success was not due to Blair's 
skill as a trainer is shown by the fact that he never 
made a hit training other horses, although for a time 
he had a barn full. Maud had nerve force and there 
were days when she acted as if she would like to 
kick. In fact, I am told that Mr. Vanderbilt sold her 
to Mr. Bonner because one day, driving her double, 
he had occasion to lift her tail with the butt end 
of the whip and found she resented it. 

Jay Eye See held the trotting championship of the 
world for but one day, but in the matter of age 
championships he always was celebrated, having the 
low mark at four and five years to his credit. I 
never heard much about his peculiarities, and am 
inclined to think he was not out of the common in 
this respect. 

Sunol, who succeeded Maud S., startled the world 
as a two-year-old, and she is the only champion trot- 
ter that stood at the top at that age. She was all 
nerves — a bundle of them on four legs — and she was 
certainly a crank in many ways. Like Dexter, she 
was not overfond of her driver, but she had no capa- 
city for identifying Marvin otherwise than by his 
voice, which is the case with most horses. When he 
spoke she was ready to scrap if in the stall, but on 
the track, she recognized him as the right man for 
the place. 

Nancy Hanks was the first trotter to beat 2:05, 
and the bike sulky enabled her to do it. At the 
start of her harness career she was a pacer, and it 
was only by working her over a ploughed field that 
Ben Kenney got her to hit a trot and stick to it. 
She was the third champion driven to the record 
by Doble. Nancy was notional. For one thing, she 
would decline to enter a blacksmith shop unless a 
whisp of hay was brought along and she was "tolled" 
over the threshold. Another place she asserted her- 
self was in jogging. To begin with, she must be 
allowed to go on a pace just as long as she felt like 
it. Any attempt to change that program spoiled 
the jogging. Also, she had views about who should 
jog her, finally settling on Doble's brother, Henry, 
for whom she would go kind, but with no one else, 
fussing and taking a lot out of herself if he was not 
there. 

Alix had less said about her in the way of personal 
gossip than any other champion trotter, and The 
Abbot, who succeeded her, was not much talked 
about in a small way. It is known that at one 
time each one of the four shoes he wore differed 
in weight from all the others. Also, that when he 
trotted in 2:03% at Terre Haute, Geers made the 
mile 2:02%, while two of the timers' watches showed 
2:03 flat, but the slowest time is always given out 
at Terre Haute, when a world's record is at stake 
and that is why The Abbot's mark is not 2:02% or 
2:03. 

John McCartney has written a book about Cresceus 
in which all his peculiarities are related He is an 
abnormally intelligent horse, has a temper of his 
own which he controls admirably, and in my humble 
judgment is the greatest trotter the world ever saw, 
although this is neither the time nor the place to 
go into that matter. 

The public is familiar with Lou Dillon. She has 
the nerve force all right and used to throw herself 
down in harness when being trained as a two-year- 
old and would lie there for an hour or so until the 
stubborn fit was over. 

Major Delmar, the only gelding to trot better than 
2:00, is all nerves, and he used to be vicious, al- 
though "Doc" Tanner says he is now pretty affable. 
He was such a rambunctious stallion as a three- 
year-old that he was gelded and when McDonald 
had him it was a four-man job to hitch him days 
when he was real sprightly. 

o 

California's favorite hot wtather drink Is Jackton'a 
Nairn Soda. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



{Saturday, January 19, 1907. 



AifiitAl*"* 

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ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



Conducted by J. X. DeWitt 

A PROMINENT IDAHO SHOTGUN EXPERT 



COAST FIELD TRIALS. 



REGION OF BIG GAME AND FINE TROUT 



Of all the game lands in the Far West, no section 
has been so little tried by sportsmen as the Upper 
Klamath Lake region in Southern Oregon. Big game 
shooting is yearl.' becoming rarer in California, but 
that segment of the Pacific Coast mountain spine be- 
tween Mount Shasta, in Superior California, and 
Mount Hood, in Southern Oregon, a wilderness prac- 
tically untouched because of its incorporation in the 
Government forest reserve, seems to have been over- 
looked by forest lovers. One reason for its wiidness, 
is that it is off the beaten track of railway thorough- 
fares. 

On the mountains girding the head of the lake 
great "burns" or brush patches miles in extent, 
which hide the scars of the ancient forest fires, give 
cover for the deer. Berry patches invite the black 
and cinnamon bear. Up to the north, where the 
mountains give way for a space to lower hills and 
open valleys, there are elk. Back at the base of bald 
Pitt Mountain, is where the "painters" or California 
cougars scream at night. 

Here answers to the fly the Dolly Varden and 
the cutthroat, the speckled trout, a peculiaiiv gamy 
fish which seems to make its habitat in no other 
place than the tributaries of Klamath. 

The deer are stalked only. It is against the ethics 
of the mountain men of Klamath to sit on a trail 
and slaughter a buck in flight from dogs. 

There are two kinds of deer that "use," as the 
mountaineers say, along the Cascade slopes in South- 
ern Oregon— the little California variety, incredibly 
swift, and the mule-tail deer, larger by may pounds 
and even more wary than his smaller brother. The 
mule tail is rarer than the California deer. He is 
found higher up on the slopes of the mountains, al- 
most at the point where the timber gives way to 
bald granite. 

The bears are plentiful, and it is customary to 
hunt them with dogs. The bear dog of the Oregon 
mountain men is of a strange and various breed. He 
may be a mongrel of no pride of ancestry or a collie 
of shadowy pedigree; usually he is just a plain, or- 
nery, yaller dog, who has the wisdom to run in and 
snap without being caught, and whose voice is in 
the basso register. Dick Silver, who lives up on 
Crystal Creek near the head of the lake, has a cross 
between a sheep dog and a won, whose sagacity and 
attainments as a "b'ar dog" are known all over Kla- 
math County. 

There are no grizzly bears in the Cascades. They 
are found in the Siskiyou range on the border of 
California, and in the coast mountains of Southern 
Oregon. The black bear that inhabits the Klamath 
region grows to remarkable size, far larger than the 
black bear of the Eastern and Middle Western States. 
The State of Oregon pays a bounty on his scalp, 
because of his depredations on the sheep and cattle. 

The California lions are numerous enough to in- 
duce nervousness at night and make it comfortable 
to be in camp by sundown, but one may hunt for 
days and never get a tawny flash of one sneaking 
through the brush. 

For the fisherman the opportunities are of never- 
ending fascination. The lake and streams are both 
at hand. The streams are white, roaring torrents, 
full of holes and riffles, where the flick of a fly on a 
short line challenges the trout. The fish are not 
wary; if they don't bite it is because the fisher has 
not offered the right fly. Food is at all times abun- 
dant for the trout, and only expert examination of 
the stomach of one of them will give the sportman 
knowledge of what feather to choose. 

A gamier fish than those in the ice-cold waters of 
the Cascade streams never rose to a fly, and the 
brushy nature of the banks makes the landing of each 
fish an individual problem. Wading boots and cast- 
up stream are almost obligatory. 

In the lake the situation is unusual. All of the 
upper end of Klamath is a great marsh, filled in by 
centuries of wasn down from the mountains. A 
floating bog would probably describe this section of 
the lake better. There are miles of trembling bunch 
grass and tules, held together by the network of 
roots and floating in water from thirty to fifty feet 
deep. Down through this bog in several places there 
are wide streams of ice-cold water from the conceal- 
ed springs along the edges of the lake. The streams 
are deep, crystal pure and moving with an almost 
imperceptible current. In these broad streams are 
the big fellows— rainbow trout grown to the stature 
of giants, muscular as bulldogs. 

These fish are broad shouldered, thick set, with 
snub noses and powerful fighting muscles behind 
the gills. They range from three pounds to twenty- 
two — the largest fish known to have been caught 
there up to a year ago. They will rise to a spoon 
at any. season and at any hour of the day; a fly 
they will take in midsummer when the live trout 
flies have all disappeared from the sides of the lake, 
but the water must be ruffled by the wind. 

One must have a boat on these marsh streams; 
there are only one or two places where landing on 
solid soil is offered. To tie the boat to a bunch of 
lily pads, then whip out sixty feet of line and let a 
royal coachman drop 'way downstream in the shadow 
by the willows is to give challenge, instantly accept- 
ed, to a battle royal. 



Peter J. Holohan of Twin Falls, Idaho, the most 
popular marksman that ever called "pull" at a 
Western trap shooting tournament, has entered the 
employ of the DuPont Powder Company as its shoot- 
ing representative in Idaho, Utah, Eastern Washing- 
ton and Eastern Oregon. He left Twin Falls on 
December 13th to cover the territory assigned to 
him and will take about six weeks to make his 
first trip. Mr. Holohan's family will remain at their 
pretty home in Twin Falls and he will retain all 
his property interests there. In addition to his 
handsome residence fronting on the park, Mr. Holo- 
han owns valuable business property on Main street 
and with his partner, Judge McKinlay, he has a 
large acreage of choice farm land near Filer. 

Mr. Holohan's pet diversion is breaking blue rocks. 
Last year he added to his already large collection 
of medals and trophies the individual Northwestern 
championship medal and the Globe trophy, won at 
Walla Walla, the high average medal won at Salt 
Lake City, the Confarr medal captured at Pocatello 
and several other mementos of the firing line. 

Fair and courteous to his competitors at the traps, 
genial and unassuming on and off the field, "Pete" 
is beloved of every man who burns powder at West- 
ern traps. He is welcomed at every meet and the 
boys would willingly shoot sawdust if "Pete" repre- 
sented the lumber trust. The only objection the 
Twin Falls sportsmen have to DuPont powder is 
that its manufacturers robbed the town of a popular 
citizen who can ill be spared. There is some com- 
pensation, however, in the fact that "Pete" is not 
likelv to forget his home and wherever he goes 
he will tell of the "Magic City." If personal popular- 
ity and skill at the traps count for anything the 
air in the vicinity of all the gun clubs in "Pete's" 
territory will soon be permeated with the odor of 
smoke from explosives produced at the factory of 
the Senator from Delaware. 

Having turned professional, "Pete" was, of course, 
barred from competing in the Moonlight handicap 
which was arranged by the members of the Twin 
Falls Rod and Gun Club and which was calculated 
to put the shooters in condition to line up the mal- 
lards as they come in at dusk. 

Mr. Holohan was present at the shoot of the 
Lewiston and Clarkston Gun clubs at Lewiston on 
January 6th and gave an exhibition of shooting that 
was highly appreciated by those present. 

As a result of the trap shoot above mentioned, it 
has been arranged to hold at Lewiston, Idaho, a big 
trap shoot the latter part of April, to which all of the 
gun clubs of the five northern counties will be in- 
vited. It is planned to have some good pool shoot- 
ing and there will probably be about $300 in pools. 
The shoot will cover only one day and a number of 
experts, including Peter Holohan of Twin Falls, re- 
presenting the Du Pont Powder Company, and W. 
F. Hillis, the Peters Company's expert, who gave 
exhibitions at the 1905 fair, will be present. 

Everyone of the fifteen shotgun enthusiasts pres- 
ent at the grounds shot Du Pont powder and some 
unusually high scores were made. Mr. Holohan, who 
was the guest of the clubs of Lewiston and Clarks- 
ton, made the highest average during the day, break- 
ing 95 bluerocks out of a possible 100. Lee Pennell 
secured the second highest average, getting 86 of 
the clay pigeons. Mr. Holohan broke 10 doubles 
straight and demonstrated his title of being one of 
the best shots in the Northwest. 

The greatest interest and enthusiasm was mani- 
fested in the shoot, and the decision to hold a big 
tournament grew out of the excellent scores made. 
Preparations will be made to entertain between 50 
and 75 visiting shooters during the tournament in 
February. 

o 

Senator McCartney of Los Angeles, who is, it is 
claimed, the most prolific member of the Senate in 
the introduction of bills, has presented a measure for 
the abolishment of coursing — the chasing of jack rab- 
bits with hounds. 



Good Quail Shooting. 

Sacramento sportsmen who have lately been disap- 
pointed at the scarcity and wariness of ducks are 
now striking off for the foothills, Shingle, Rocklin. 
Auburn and other places, beating the underbrush in 
the quest of quail. The birds are unusually thick 
this year, and when they are not scattered and kept 
in the thick shrubbery by the heavy rainfall, they 
are not generally difficult to bag. The liimt can be 
easily obtained in short order on the reserves of 
the Rocklin Gun Club. They are tantalizingly thick 
on the Rancho Del Paso, near Sacramento, but they 
are protected there for three years by the club's 
regulations. The Bob White, now protected by a 
State law, have multiplied at a great rate since the 
orgiinal birds were set loose three years ago, and 
now the place is fairly overrun with them. W. A. 
Gauge states that he started two conveys of over 
one hundred birds a week ago. 



The Pacific Coast Field Trial Club's twenty-fourth 
annual trial will begin at Bakersfield on Monday 
next, January 21st, according to the original 
schedule, which called for the meeting to be held the 
last full week of January, 1907. At one time it was 
believed the trials would be postponed for one or 
two weeks. Authoritative advices from Hon. Charles 
N. Post are that the trials will be held as above 
stated. | \ 

One deterrent feature has been the crippling ef- 
fects of distemper on several kennels of young 
English Setters and Pointers. The Derby is the 
main feature of a field trial meet, this stake being 
a competition between the selected sons and 
daughters of high-class and blue-blooded field trial 
dogs. Distemper is the one dreaded handicap for 
the young dogs. Usually the precautions of the 
handlers prevail, but despite the care and discretion 
of some of the handlers who have been located near 
Bakersfield with their charges for a month or more 
past, the dreaded disease has already carried off 
several valuable young dogs, among them Bessie Mor- 
timer, the winner of last year's Derby, and Blue 
Belle and Shasta Daisy, winners of first and second 
places in the recent British Columbia and Northwest 
field trial Derby stakes. 

Birds are plentiful on the selected grounds and 
cover conditions are most favorable. The grounds 
have been patrolled for several months past, the 
birds in consequence having been free from molesta- 
tion. The recent trains in that section will be most 
favorable for scent work by the dogs. 

The judges will probably be selected from the 
Coast sportsmen in attendance. Should Mr. Thomas 
Johnson of Winnipeg. Canada, be present it is very 
likely he will be invited by the club to act as one of 
the judges. It has been reported that Mr. Johnson is 
en route for Bakersfield. This will be his second ap- 
pearance at the club's trials. 

Most of the sportsmen from this city and Sacra- 
mento will start for the trials next Sunday. 

There will be a strong representation of field trial 
enthusiasts from Southern California this year. A 
number of new faces will also be seen at the trials, 
among them E. Courtney Ford, who has entered his 
English Setter, Belle Fontaine, in the Members' 
Stake. Elmer Cox of Madera has a puppy which 
was presented to him by Joseph E. Terry that on 
breeding lines should prove a close contender for 
initial Derby honors. The youngster is a litter 
brother to Blue Belle and Shasta Daisy. Bert Tib- 
bet will enter a young dog in the Members' Stake 
that he considers equal to the effort of winning the 
stake. This Setter was bred by Hon. Chas. N. Post 
of Sacramento, the dean of the Coast field trial en- 
thusiasts. o 

CALIFORNIA ANGLERS' ASSOCIATION. 



A well attended meeting of the California Anglers' 
Association, despite the inclement weather, was held 
last Wednesday evening at the residence of Mr. Jos. 
Uri, 1849 O'Farrell street, this city. 

The report of the board of directors showed that 
the association was in a flourishing condition and 
was unanimously adopted. In this report several 
measures were suggested for the better protection 
of fish. These subjects were discussed at length, 
in regard to striped bass, the following resolution be- 
ing adopted: 

Whereas, It has come to the knowledge of the 
California Anglers' Association by observation, re- 
ports and results of personal inquiry, that through 
the gross violation of existing laws intended for the 
protection of fish in the waters of the State and the 
non-enforcement of said laws the striped bass is 
fast disappearing from said waters and that unless 
prompt and stringent measures are soon adopted for 
the enforcement of the laws and the prosecution and 
punishment of violators this fine game and table fish 
will soon become entirely extinct: and 

Whereas, The striped bass is not protected from 
capture during the spawning period, which is agreed 
upon by the highest authorities familiar with the 
habits of the fish to be during the months of Febru- 
ary, March, April and May; therefore be it 

Resolved. That this Association recommend to the 
State Legislature now in session at Sacramento the 
passage of a law that will thoroughly protect striped 
bass from capture during their spawning season. 

It was decided also that the association should have 
representation at Sacramento in- the interest of fish 
protection. 

The recommendation of the board of directors that 
the association be incorporated was acted upon favor- 
ably. 

The officers of the association are: President, 
James Watt; First Vice-President, D. M. Sachs; 
Second Vice-President, Achille Roos; Secretary, W. 
R. Eaton; Treasurer, Western National Bank; mem- 
bers of finance committee, J. Pincus, L. V. Merle, L. 
Levy; holdover directors, E. M. Pomeroy, William F. 
Hillegass, John H. Sammi, C. R. Overholtzer, George 
A. Wentworth; five new directors elected were. S. 
A. Wells, R. Haas, C. J. Ashlin, Charles J. Breiden- 
stein and H. Copeland. 

o 

Several boxes of China pheasant feathers have 
been shipped from Albany, Ore., to decorate the hats 
of Eastern women, the recipients being women who 
attend the national convention of the Women's Mis- 
sionary Society of the United Presbyterian Church, 
which met in Albany in 1905. There they saw hats 
decorated with China pheasant feathers for the first 
time and since then they have been begging their 
Albany friends to send them some of the feathers 
of the Oriental bird. 



Saturday, January 19, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB, INCORPORATED, IN 
TROUBLE. 

The dissatisfaction pervading the rank and file of 
the Eastern fancy caused hy the recent incorpora- 
tion of the American Kennel Club, whereby, it is 
claimed, the majority of the individual kennel clubs 
of this country have been practically disfranchised 
was strongly shown at the informal meeting held in 
New York on January 3d, in pursuance to a call is- 
sued and signed by Messrs. R. Stewart Edson, dele- 
gate of the Collie Club of America; J. W. Britton II, 
delegate of the Bull Terrier Breeders' Association; 
Clair Foster, delegate of the Bull Terrier Club o'f 
America, and J. E. De Mund, delegate of the Russian 
Wolfhound Club of America. 

The meeting was called to order by Dr. De Mund. 

On motion seconded and carried Dr. F. H. Osgood 
was elected chairman of the meeting, and J. W. Brit- 
ton II secretary. 

The roll call developed that the following (23) 
named clubs of the American Kennel Club (Inc.) 
were represented at the meeting: Boston Terrier 
Club, Bulldog Club of America, Bull Terrier Club of 
America, Bull Terrier Breeders' Association, Collie 
Club of America, Brocton District Kennel Club, Great 
Dane Club of America, Long Island Kennel Club, 
French Bulldog Club, Interstate Kennel Club, Rock- 
land County Agricultural Society, Irish Setter Club, 
Orange County Agricultural Society, Portland Ken- 
nel Club, Crotona Collie Club, Philadelphia Pointer 
Club, Altoona Kennel Club, Russian Wolfhound Club, 
Seattle Dog Fanciers' Association, Franklin Kennel 
Club, American Pomeranian Club, Bay State Co- 
Operative Bench Show Association, Ladies' Kennel 
Association of America. 

Letters were received expressing sympathy with 
and co-operation in the objects for which the meet- 
ing was called from the following named clubs: 
Atlantic City Kennel Club, Dalmatian Club, Airedale 
Club of America, Wissahickon Kennel Club. 

A committee of five was elected, consisting of the 
chairman and representatives of the four clubs who 
were responsible for the original call for the meet- 
ing. The committee will acquaint all the delegates 
not present at the meeting and the secretaries of 
all the kennel clubs of America with the proceed- 
ings of the meeting and the sentiments of the dele- 
gates present, and will also take such action as they 
see fit for the adoption of the amendments pro- 
posed. 

The prevailing idea with many of the dissention- 
ists is that the American Kennel Club has at last 
taken anchorage in the haven of professionalism. If 
so, this port is full of rocks that will eventually 
wreck the ship. If this claim is well founded the 
amateur fanciers have a hard but not impossible 
task before them to save and pilot the official ship 
of America ndogdom into safe waters again. 

In referring to the situation the American Field 
says: 

"That there was necessity for the meeting every 
reader of the American Field who has kept posted 
on passing events knows. The consensus of opinion 
of those present was that certain officials of the 
American Kennel Club, led by a non-elective official 
under the old constitution, to-wit, the secretary, held 
back cards on them and did not give the one hun- 
dred and thirty-odd delegates to the American Ken- 
nel Club, unincorporated, a square deal. Just who 
dealt the cards and engineered the deal no one 
wanted to say; but when the meeting decided that 
the amendments, must be accepted by the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club at its annual meeting next month, 
if the American Kennel Club is to continue to exist 
as an association of amateurs. Dr. J. E. De Mund, 
who heartily supported the amendments, is quoted to 
have made the following statement to the delegates 
present: 'Secretary Vredenburgh said the amend- 
ments would only pass over his dead body. I do 
not think it was a remark in the club spirit that 
bands amateurs together who breed, show and talk 
dog.' 

The amendments referred to had been delivered to 
the secretary of the American Kennel Club by Dr. 
J. E. De Mund and Mr. R. S. Edson, to be sure they 
would be filed thirty days before the annual meeting, 
and one would suppose, from the secretary's remark, 
that he considered himself the whole club." 

Dr. F. H. Osgood, the chairman, representing the 
Boston Terrier Club, among other things stated: 

"Mr. Relmont would not be one to cut off at one 
stroke the sporting comradeship and substitute a 
cold-blooded business directorship or dictatorship. 
We have all been honored to meet as amateurs to 
discuss the interests of the dog. Unless the matter 
went before Mr. Belmont in a biased way, I do not 
think he would have sanctioned disfranchisement 
of any club delegate or have taken up the papers 
of incorporation, save after a vote at an annual meet- 
ing." 

Excerpts from the remarks of other speakers were 
pertinent to the objects of the meeting. 

Mr. S. W. Maguire (Irish Setter Club) said: 
"The incorporators went forward, step by step, 
as steadily as soldiers. The reasons quoted may 
sound sweet on their ears. But what concerns us, 
who love the club of amateurs that has been quashed, 
are matters that have not been revealed. In the 
report of the American Kennel Club meeting of 
December 19th, which put through the incorpora- 
tion, I appear as one of the unanimous supporters 
of the act. If I had been at the meeting I should 
have opposed the action. I didn't know until seeing 
the minutes anything that had been done. 



"There had been rumors that the next annual 
meeting would not be so harmonious in retaining 
all the old officers. The way to forestall an upset 
was to spring a new constitution that would make 
thirty directors rule, instead of all the delegates. 
I and some others who were not at the meeting had 
this lemon handed to us. The club spirit may have 
actuated Mr. Belmont, but it seems queer how I 
could have become a unanimous incorporator. I 
think cards were held out on him. Why not have 
our committee call on Mr. Belmont and explain 
we are loyal, although disfranchised, and to ask his 
aid in restoring the old-time fellowship?" 

Considerable resentment was voiced because the 
control of the American Kennel Club had been t alien 
away from the constituent club members and lodged 
in the board of directors, without responsibility to 
the delegates. The directors are not required to be 
delegates of any club, some of the present officials 
not now having even any kennel interests, and under 
the existing system it would be difficult to change 
the control, even though all of the clubs might be 
a unit in opposition, for the reason that it would 
take years to install a new directorate, due to the 
incorporators naming the officers and directors, the 
latter with five-year terms. 

"Mr. S. R. Cutler of the Bay State Kennel Club 
announced his chagrin the morning of the meeting, 
when he called at the office of the American Kennel 
Club to pay his club's annual dues, $10, and which 
Secretary Vredenburgh refused, because, under the 
new constitution, dues had to be paid by December 
31st. Mr. Cutler understood forty-nine clubs had 
been dropped on this account. 

"If the amendments to the constitution of the 
American Kennel Club, incorporated, approved at 
this meeting are adopted at the coming annual meet- 
ing of the American Kennel Club, incorporated, con- 
stituent clubs will regain their constitutional rights 
and have something to say, through their delegates, 
how the American Kennel Club shall govern its mem- 
bers and what disposition shall be made of the large 
cash asset that these clubs have built up in one way 
and another, the despotic transfer of which to the 
incorporated American Kennel Club caused such a 
just storm of protest." 



American Kennel Club Control. 

The committee of five appointed by the protesting 
delegates of the American Kennel Club, who object 
to the constitutional changes effected by the in- 
corporators of the club, which deprive them of all 
power and place the control in the hands of the 
board of directors, in whose election only the incor- 
porators had a voice, is hopeful of reaching a satis- 
factory settlement of their difficulties through the 
constitutional amendments proposed to be voted on 
at the annual meeting next month, but in the failure 
to thus secure relief it is determined to fight it out 
in the courts. 

The difficulty complained of at the meeting was 
that the incorporation of the club was effected pur- 
suant to a resolution suggested in May, 1901, and 
authorized by the club in September, 1901. It was 
actually effected in December, 1903, when eight men 
acted as incorporators. In November of last year 
they formulated a constitution and by-laws and 
elected themselves on a directorate of eight mem- 
bers, which was subsequently enlarged to thirty 
members. They chose August Belmont president, 
and Hollis H. Hunnewell vice-president, and then 
proceeded to nominate and elect the board of thirty 
directors. Before doing this they voted to admit 
to membership all the present members of the old 
American Kennel Club, incorporated, provided their 
dues were paid before January 1, 1907. From these 
new members thus elected they filled the vacancies 
in the directorate. ■ 

All this was formal and necessary before a meet- 
ing of the old American Kennel Club could be called 
to vote to join the new club. This meeting was then 
called without full explanations of the organization 
of the new club, and the old club voted to join the 
new club and disband the old, turning over to the 
new all the moneys and assets of the old. Then, 
finding themselves members of the new club, they 
learned for the first time that under the changes 
effected in the constitution the government of the 
new body was vested absolutely in the board of 
directors already chosen. The delegates from the 
specialty clubs, which formerly had governed the 
association, were deprived of all their powers. The 
directors even elected officers, and the old member- 
ship had no more voice in the new association than 
if they had never been affiliated with the old, which 
the new was supposed to reproduce. Moreover, they 
discovered that the board of directors had been elect- 
ed for terms varying from one to five years, and it 
would be at least four years before any appreciable 
change could be effected in its personnel by the 
process provided of electing six new members every 
year, beginning in February, 1908. And the terms 
of the officers were increased to three years, and 
these could not be replaced until February, 1910. 

It is impossible to set aside the election, and the 
only means open to retake possession of their own 
was to propose amendments to the constitution, up- 
setting the present provisions and restoring the 
delegates to supreme authority, to be acted on at the 
annual meeting of the new American Kennel Club. 
Those had been prepared and previously presented 
to the club in order to comply with the requirement 
of thirty days' notice. They were reaffirmed by the 
meeting, subject to such amendment as is deemed 
necessary at the annual meeting. 

It is pointed out that even though the amendments 
were passed there would be no possible means of up- 
setting the elections already effected, and that for 



three years the same officers would hold unless they 
voluntarily resigned, and the same directors would 
hold office from one to five years. 
Dissension in the American Kennel Club. 

The following review of the situation is taken from 
the Boston Herald: 

The American Kennel Club has trouble on its 
hands. It started out of the incorporation of the 
association, which some claim has made the directors 
the controlling power instead of the delegates of 
all the clubs that hold membership. As a result a 
lawsuit is threatened, those loudest in their kicks 
claiming that their vested rights have been usurped 
and violated. It is also claimed by them that their 
representation has been taken away from them and 
their privileges abrogated without an equivalent. 

As a starter, the Bull Terrier Club has sent out 
circulars to the other specialty clubs asking for a 
special meeting of the American Kennel Club for 
the purpose of discussing the legality of incorpora- 
tion, it being claimed that the incorporation has 
deprived the members of specialty clubs of their 
rights in goods, chattels and influence in the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club. In order to have a special meet- 
ing called it is necessary to secure the signatures 
of representatives of seven clubs, and, after the 
application for such a meeting has been made, the 
meeting can be called at the discretion of the presi- 
dent of the club, August Belmont, in fifteen days 
after the matter has first been submitted to the exe- 
cutive board. 
Official Statement. 

Secretary-treasurer A. P. Vredenburgh of the 
American Kennel Club said in reference to the dis- 
sension: In regard to the incorporation the eight 
members of the then executive board procured arti- 
cles of incorporation for the American Kennel Club 
from the Secretary of the State at' Albany on De- 
cember 31,1903. It was not until December 19th of 
the present year that the • executive committee 
deemed it best to reorganize the American Kennel 
Club in accordance with the articles of incorporation. 
At a general meeting held then it was decided to 
incorporate and to add to the number of eight incor- 
porators, who had given bonds for the perforamnce 
of their duties, twenty-two other directors, who were 
chosen from the delegates of the specialty clubs. 
This gives the American Kennel Club a board of 
thirty directors. The term of six of these directors 
expires each year, and at the annual meeting the 
successors to the six will be elected by the delegates. 
Instead of the delegates electing at this meeting a 
board of eight, leaving to the chairman the choice 
of committee, the delegates will vote for six direc- 
tors. The thirty directors will be the ruling body 
in the organization, but they represent the specialty 
clubs, and actually the change means nothing but 
the simplification of the business methods. 

There were no protests at the special meeting of 
the delegates called to act on the change. 

There were no protests, although the Bull Terrier 
Club of America had a representation at the meeting. 
It is this club I have heard unofficially that is now 
leading a protest against the act of incorporation. 
Chairman Belmont, on the question being voted on, 
found the decision to be unanimous in the affirmative. 
Also by unanimous vote August Belmont as presi- 
dent and myself as secretary-treasurer were em- 
powered to make a transfer of all the property of 
the American Kennel Club to the incorporators. 
We therefore executed a bill of sale for the goods 
and chattels from the old organization to the new 
incorporation. 

The American Kennel Club will remain the repre- 
sentative body of the active members, and, except 
for a difference in methods, it will be governed by 
the will of the majority. It will remain single and 
undivided the champion of the thoroughbred dog 
and of the supporters of the thoroughbred dog. The 
publication of the stud book and its many ramifica- 
tions as the national body has made expedient the 
incorporation, but in spirit and in the recognition 
of every specialty club the American Kennel Club is 
unchanged and unaltered. 
The Opposition View. 

One of the leaders in the movement for the special 
meeting said: "The American Kennel Club, in its 
influence and wealth, stands for nothing but tho 
dues and fees of its loyal members. In taking out 
articles of incorporation the executive board, as they 
say in the West, has jumped the claim of the dele- 
gates. That the incorporation is three years old is 
news to me. The step may be for the best, but 
it should only have been taken after a public hear- 
ing at a full meeting. The delegates have legal 
rights as well as the incorporators. I favor a special 
meeting at which this action and the reasons for it 
shall be fully explained." 
Now on a Solid Foundation. 

When first organized twenty-five years ago in 
Philadelphia the American Kennel Club was to only 
regulate and supervise bench shows in this country 
and Canada. Some years later, on the election of 
A. P. Vredenburgh as secretary-treasurer, the organ- 
ization took a foremost place by undertaking the 
official stud book. August Helmont, as the president, 
gave a guarantee of $5,000 yearly for five years to 
enable the American Kennel Club to undertake I he 
new and ambitious plans. Rival stud books were 
merged into the official venture, either by gift or 
purchase, and under the management of Vredenburgh 
the American Kennel Club has been so successful 
that, the Helmont guarantee had not to be used. 

Under the new national law regarding the impor- 
tation of dogs, the pedigrees must be backed by a 
recognized and incorporated organization. This and 
the fact that an unincorporated body may not hold 
real estate or build are reasons given for the incor- 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 19. 1907. 



poration aside from the increased facility the change 
gives in carrying out the general business. The 
American Kennel Club is paramount in every part of 
the United States in dog matters. It is the supreme 
board of control, and besides doing a great bulk of 
yearly business the organization has become very 
wealthy. The incorporators have their legal respon- 
sibilities fixed, and they are prepared to defend 
their position against all objectors. 

o 

THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB, INC. 



called the rank and file were selected as members 
of the Board of Directors. It might be well to re- 
produce the attendance at every quarterly meeting 
for the last six years and we do it herewith: 

Number of Club Members For Six Years. 

1901 60 I 1904 76 

1902 68 I 1905 107 

1903 72 | 1906 127 

Number of Delegates Present at Quarterly Meetings 
During Five Years, and Names of Clubs 
Represented. 



TO THE SECRETARIES AND DELEGATES OF 

THE ACTIVE MEMBERS— 
Office of the American Kennel Club (Incorporated), 
55 Liberty Street, New York, December 29, 1906: 
Whereas, there was some discussion at the last 
meeting of the Board of Directors relative to the fact 
that the constitution of the present American Ken- 
nel Club is different from that of the old American 
Kennel Club (unincorporated), and as it was ap- 
parent that some confusion and misunderstanding 
exist as to why the two constitutions are not exactly 
alike, it was deemed expedient to appoint a commit- 
tee to draft a statement, so that the members and 
the delegates could be fully nformed of the facts. 
The undersigned committee was duly appointed for 
that purpose. 

The committee held a meeting for the purpose of 
its appointment on Saturday, December 29, 1906, 
at 12.30 P. M. ( at the American Kennel Club rooms, 
and adopted the following report: 

First. — The committee deemed it proper to set 
before the public the remarks made by Mr. Belmont, 
the president, at the special meeting of the American 
Kennel Club (unincorporated), held for the purpose 
of transferring the property of the said club to the 
American Kennel Club (Incorporated), as published 
in the New York Sun of November 20, 1906, and 
which were inadvertently left out of the American 
Kennel Gazette. They are as follows: 

Over twenty-one years ago a small body of en- 
thusiastic dog men met in Philadelphia and organ- 
ized the American Kennel Club with the greatest 
harmony, and now after this lapse of time it meets 
to-day and dissolves the old organization in the 
same unanimous and harmonious manner. It is a 
matter of congratulation that the delegates have 
shown this spirit, and there is no doubt but that 
the directors of the incorporated body, who will have 
the management of the club, will safeguard the 
best interests of the breeders and exhibitors in the 
same way as did the delegates of the club. 

Second. — The committee find that the idea of in- 
corporating tne American Kennel Club is no new 
one, but was started as far back as May, 1901. About 
this time a member of the New York Bar, who was 
much interested in the club and its welfare, pointed 
out to the secretary the hazard of remaining an un- 
incorporated association by reason of the provisions 
of the statutes of this State in regard to unincor- 
porated clubs, some of which were practically im- 
possible to be carried out and the failure to carry 
out which would render the secretary liable to fine 
and imprisonment, and, further, that the experience 
of the club in its suit for libel might be repeated 
with more disastrous results than were averted 
through Mr. Belmont's generosity. Accordingly, in 
May, 1901, a resolution was unanimously passed ap- 
pointing a committee to consider the advisability 
of incorporating the club; and subsequently, on the 
17th day of September, 1901, the matter, having been 
again brought up before the club and discussed, it 
was unanimously resolved that the committee be 
authorized to incorporate the American Kennel Club. 
Mr. Rodman, a member of that committee, unfortu- 
nately died, and for some time the matter was held 
in abeyance. Subsequently Mr. Rockefeller was ap- 
pointed to fill the vacancy on that committee and the 
club was finally incorporated, and after several de- 
lays such incorporation was completed in November 
of this year. The certificate of incorporation was 
duly granted in December, 1903, but every precau- 
tion and care was taken, so that the matter was not 
hastened in its completion. 

We think it is unnecessary for us to comment fur- 
ther upon the cause for incorporation or the care 
with which the subject matter proceed, nor the pub- 
licity given It, because during the five years the mat- 
ter has been the subject of general and public con- 
versation and nearly every delegate of prominence 
in the American Kennel Club has discussed it. 

Thrd. — From the nature of the organization it was 
necessary to incorporate the club as a membership 
corporation; and under the provisions of the Mem- 
bership Corporation Act, a club is to be governed by 
a board of directors which shall consist of not more 
than thirty members. To give delegates the utmost 
representation possible under the act, the number of 
directors was, accordingly, fixed at thirty, the maxi- 
mum allowed by law. The fact that so large a num- 
ber of the delegates would be in the board of direc- 
tors and that that board could be more easily called 
together than the delegates at large was considered 
to be sufficient reason to leave out the quarterly 
meetings of the delegates, which meetings are re- 
placed by meetings of the board of directors. The 
delegates, however, still have the same power to 
call special meetings as they had under the consti- 
tution of the unincorporated club. The executive 
committee was left exactly as in the old club — its 
powers are no different and its members are the 
same. The standing committees are identical, and, 
as a matter of fact, all of the old standing commit- 
tees were elected members of the present standing 
committees and directors of the club. 

A list of the delegates present during the last six 
years indicates that the nucleus of what might be 



1901. 



February. 

American Pomeranian Club, F. S. Stcdman. 

American Spaniel Club, M. A. Viti. 

Boston Terrier Club, C. F. Ciarkson. 

Bulldog Club of America, Tyler Morse. 

Chicago Pet Dog Club, Frank R. Story. 

CcJlie CluL of America, James Watson. 

Columbus Fanciers' Club, J. M. Taylor. 

Dog Owners' Protective Association of Cincinnati, 
C. W. Rodman Jr. 

Duquesne Kennel Club, G. M. Carnochan. 

French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 

Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 

Irish Terrier Club, S. Van Schaick. 

Airedale Terrier Club of America, A. D. Cochrane. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, 
Henry Jarrett. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 

Metropolitan Kennel Club, H. T. Foote. 

New England Beagle Club, John Caswell. 

New England Kennel Club, Edward Brooks. 

Rhode Island Kennel Club, W. C. Codman. 

San Francisco Kennel Club, C. B. Knocker. 

Scottish Terrier Club of America, J. B. Brazier. 

St. Bernard Club of California, J. L. Arden. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
May. 

American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 

American Dachshund Club, Dr. C. Motschenbacher. 

American Spaniel Club, M. A. Viti. 

Dog Owners' Protective Association of Cincinnati, 
C. W. Rodman Jr. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 

Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 

Irsh Terrier Club, S. Van Schaick. 

Metropolitan Kennel Club, H. T. Foote. 

National Beagle Club. J. W. Appleton. 

New England Kennel Club, Edward Brooks. 

Pointer Club of America, George Jarvis. 

Rhode Island Kennel Club, W. C. Codman. 

The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
September. 

American Spaniel Club, M. A. Viti. 

Brunswick Fur Club, R. Compton. 

Collie Club of America, James Watson. 

Dog Owners' Protective Association of Cincinnati, 
C. W. Rodman, Jr. 

Duquesne K. C. of Western Pennsylvania, G. M. 
Carnochan. 

French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 

Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, 
Henry Jarrett. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 

Metropolitan Kennel Club, H. T. Foote. 

National Beagle Club, J. W. Appleton. 

Pointer Club of America, George Jarvis. 

San Francisco Kennel Club, C. B. Knocker. 

The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
December. 

Airedale Terrier Club of America, A. D. Cochrane. 
American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 
American Spaniel Club, M. A. Viti. 
Brunswick Fur Club, R. Compton. 
Bull Terrier Club of America, Frank H. Croker. 
Dog Owners' Protective Association of Cincinnati, 
C. W. Rodman, Jr. 

Duquesne Kennel Club, G. M. Carnochan. 
French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 
Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 
Pointer Club of America, George Jarvis. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, C. B. Knocker. 
Texas Kennel Club, George W. Clayton. 
Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 



1902. 



February. 

American Spaniel Club, M. A. Viti. 

Boston Terrier Club, Dr. H. E. Owen. 

Bulldog Club of America, Tyler Morse. 

Collie Club of America, James Watson. 

Columbus Fanciers' Club, J. M. Taylor. 

Dog Owners' Protective Association of Cincinnati, 
C. W. Rodman, Jr. 

Duquesne K. C. of Western Pennsylvania, G. M. 
Carnochan. 

French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 
Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 
Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, 
Henry Jarrett. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
National Beagle Club, J. W. Appleton. 
New England Beagle Club, John Caswell. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, C. B. Knocker. 
Westminster Kennel Club, R. H. Williams. 



G. M. 



May. 

American Spaniel Club, M. A. Viti. 
Atlanta Kennel Club, H. T. Foote. 
Chicago Kennel Club, C. W. Rodman, Jr. 
Columbus Fanciers' Club, J. M. Taylor. 
Duquesne Kennel Club, G. M. Carnochan. 
French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 
Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, C. B. Knocker. 
Sixth District Agricultural Association of Los 
Angeles, S. C. Mastick. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Westminster Kennel Club, R. H. Williams. 
December. 

American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 
Atlanta Kennel Club, H. T. Foote 
Bull Terrier Club of America, Frank H. Croker. 
Chicago Kennel Club, C. W. Rodman, Jr. 
Collie Club of America, M. M. Palmer. 
Colorado Kennel Club, James Watson. 
Duquesne K. C. of Western Pennsylvania, 
Carnochan. _ T „ . t , 

French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 
Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt 
Irish Terrier Club of America. S. Van Schaick. 
Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
..liddlesex East Agl. Association, C. W. Keyes. 
New Jersey Kennel Club, C. G. Hopton 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
Texas Kennel Club, George W. Clayton. 
The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 

Mortimer. . „. tl , 

Welsh Terrier Club of America. B. S. Smith. 
American Spaniel Club, H. K. Bloodgood. 
Orange Co. Agl. Society, W. G. Davis. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 



1903. 
February. 

Airedale Terrier Club of America, A. D. Cochrane. 
American Fox Terrier Club, H H HTUmewell. 
Bull Terrier Club of America, Frank H. Cioker. 
Chicago Kennel Club, C. W. Rodman Jr. 
Duquesne Kennel Club, G. M. Carnochan. 
French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 
Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey 
Scottish Terrier Club of America, R. F. Perkins. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
Texas Kennel Club, George W. Ciayton. 
Westminster Kennel Club, R. H. Williams. 
May. 

American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 
Atlanta Kennel Club, Dr. H. T. Foote. 
Boston Terrier Club, Dwight Moore. 
Chicago Kennel Club, C. W. Rodman Jr. 
Colorado Kennel Club, James Watson 
French Bulldog Club of America, F J. Bristol. 
Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
Rhode Island Kennel Club, W. C. Codman. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
Welsh Terrier Club, B. S. Smith. 
Wissahickon Kennel Club, Murray Bohlen. 
September. 

American Spaniel Club, H. K. Bloodgood. 
Boston Terrier Club, Dwight Moore. 
Colorado Kennel Club, James Watson. 
Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt 
Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 
National Beagle Club, James W. Appleton. 
V, w England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
Haverhill Kennel Club, M. A. Kmpe. 

December. 

American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 

American Spaniel Club. b. K. Bloodgood. 

Atlanta Kennel Club, Dr. H. T. Foote. 

Atlantic City Kennel Club, J. S. Price. 

Bay State Co-Operative Bench Show Association, 
g Cutler 

Boston Terrier Club, Dwight Moore. 

Bryn Mawr Kennel Club, J. A. Caldwell. 

Bulldog Club of America, W. C. Codman. 

Bull Terrier Club of America. Frank H. Croker. 

Colorado Kennel Club, James Watson. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. . ,. 

Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 

Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, 
Henry Jarrett. 

I^ong Island Kennel Club, J. M. Dale. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 

New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 

New Jersey Kennel Club, C. G. Hopton. 

Scottish Terrier Club of America, Richard F. 
Perkins. 

Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
St Louis Collie Club. Daniel Buckley. 
Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Wissahickon Kennel Club, Murray Bohlen. 
(Concluded next week.) 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. It means health. 



Saturday, January 19, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN' 



13 



If cows are not kept comfortable 
during the stormy winter weather, the 
best returns should not be expected 
from them. A dairy cow is essentially 
different in physical condition from a 
beef cow or steer. Protection is neces- 
sary to a degree for all stock, but to 
a cow whose chief activity is convert- 
ing food into milk it is doubly neces- 
sary. 



For concrete floors, mix thoroughly 
with water three parts of sand to one 
of cement, add five times the bulk of 
cement in fine stone, and mix again. 
After spreading, tamp with a base ten 
inches square until the water appears 
on the surface. Smooth the surface 
and let dry for five days. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HI" MAN REMEDY for Rheu- 
matism, Sprains, Sore Throat, et.., it 

is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Catistlc Balsam Bold is 
Warranted to trive satisfaction. Price M.;,o 
per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE LAWRENCE- WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio 



WEBSTER'S 

INTERNATIONAL 

g DlCTI,ONARV Q 




NEEDED in every HOME, 
SCHOOL and OFFICE. 



Reliable, Useful, Attractive, Lasting, TJp 
to Date and Authoritative. 2380 Pages, 
5000 Illustrations. Recently added 25,000 
New Words, New Gazetteer and New Bio- 
graphical Dictionary. Editor W. T. Harris, 
Ph.D., LL.D., United States Com. of Ed'n. 
Highest Awards at St. Louia and Portland. 



Webster'B Collegiate Dictionary. Largest of 
our abridgments. Regular and Thin Paper 
editions. Unsurpassed for elegance and con- 
venience, pages and 1100 illustrations. 



"Write for "The Story of a Book"— Free. 
G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Springfield, Mass. 
GET THE BEST. 



PETER SAXE & SON, 513 32d street, 
Oakland, Cal., Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers for past thirty years. All varie- 
ties Cattle. Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence so- 
licited. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DUR- 
HAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs, 
Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Niles 
& Co., Los Angeles. Cal. 



PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY 

High Class Art 
— In — 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 

BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 

Dealers in PAPER, 

No. 403 Twelfth St., Oakland 

Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 
Blake, Mofflt & Towne, Los Angeles. 



A Guide to Horse Boot 
Buying— Free 



The latest and greatest improve- 
ments in tiorse Boots — the re- 
sult of two years' planning, as- 
sisted by the advice and ideas 
of the master reinsmen of the 
country — will be found in our 
new catalogue. It shows more 
new patterns and improvements 
than any catalogue ever pub- 
lished. We are making the only 
absolutely new and up-to-date 
line of horse boots on the mar- 
ket this year. Old styles and 
finish left far behind. Don't buy 
a dollar's worth until you see 
our new book. It's free. Write 
to-day. 




• NOTICE THE SHAPE 

THE NEW "SELL" 

WIDE HEEL 
QUARTER BOOT 

An improvement in construction 
that you have waited for a long 
time — originated and perfected 
by us. This boot follows the 
natural lines of the hoof, fits 
closely and comfortably, and 
positively will not rub, pinch, 
chafe, bruise or injure the quar- 
ters or heels in any way. Our 
improved method of pressing 
makes the shape permanent, and 
it will outwear any other quar- 
ter boot on the market. Beware 
of imitations of this boot. 

EXAMINE THE CUT 

and consider the following points: 
AT A A the curves are made 
correctly, permitting the 
straps to be drawn tightly 
without pinching or chafing 
the quarters. 



AT B B the curves prevent all 
danger of bruising the heels. 

AT C we have cut away part of 
the boot to show our Improv- 
ed Metal Gore Support. It 
holds the boot in position and 
prevents the stitching from 
ripping at the gore, and posi- 
tively will not injure the 
horse's heels. 




OURNEWWAST 
0FSEWING 
THE STRAPS 
ON THE WRAP 
PERS TO PRE- 
VENT CHAFING 



ANOTHER IMPROVEMENT 

See how the straps are sewed 
to the wrapper of the leg boots. 
All straps are sewed to a sep- 
arate piece of leather which is 
securely stitched to the wrapper. 
This prevents chafing and the 
straps will not pull off. Es- 
pecially good for boots with 
kersey wrappers. 



SELL BRAND 

Boots (formerly known as the 
Gilliam) are now carried in 
stock by the leading dealers in 
the West. For free catalogue 
address 

THE SELL HORSE GOODS CO. 
CANTON, OHIO. 



J. R. Wilson. A. F. Rooker 

WILSON & ROOKER 

Livery, Board and Feed Stable 

All kinds of team work on short no- 
tice. Contractors for Grading and Ex- 
cavating. 410 Franklin St., eor. Grove. 
San Francisco, CaL 

Fred Mast Successor to Zlbbell & Son 

THE AVENUE STABLE. 
672-680 11th Ave., on« block north of 
Chutaa. 

A nice Una of New Livery; Largre, 
Clean Box Stalls. Special attention paid 
to boarding high-class horses. Work 
horses for any business for hire at all 
times. All kinds of country horses for 
sale. 



VETERINARY DENTISTRY 

Ira Barker Dalziel, formerly of 605 Golden 
Gate Ave., is now permanently located at 

620 Octavia St., San Francisco 

Between Fulton and Grove Sts. 
Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. 

Complicated cases treated successfully. 
Calls from out of town promptly respon- 
ded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
620 Octavia St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Special 2074 



Registered Trade Mark % ^^fcj 

"V^ S PAVI N CURE N 





FROM NEW ZEALAND 

GEO. E. CLARK & SONS 
Land, Produce and General Merchants 

Cambridge, New Zealand, Nov. 13, '06 
Troy Chemical Co., Hinghampton, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs: — When I left San Francisco in 1903 I brought a bottle of "Savc- 
the-Horse." You may now ship me six bottles, for which I enclose draft on 
bank of New Zealand. Ship to Geo. E. Clark & Sons, Cambridge, Auckland, 
New Zealand. Yours Faithfully, 

HARRY H. CLARK 

Knight & Heggerty 

LAW OFFICES 
230 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 



December 19th. 
Dear Sir: I have a standard bred 
"Cupid" mare raised by Adolph Spreck- 
els, the well known Californian and 
horse breeder, and after driving her a 
few months a bad spavin showed itself. 
It was fired and blistered by a veterin- 
ary and the animal turned out for three 
months. The spavin was obstinate and 
the mare continued lame. I used two 
bottles of "Save-the-Horse" and a com- 
plete cure was the result. Yours, 

GEO. A. KNIGHT. 

Rancho Del Valle, Pleasanton 
Pleasanton Hop Company 
Rancho de Loma, Livermore 
Vina de Lomitas, Livermore 



San Francisco, Cal., December 4th, 

Gentlemen: I have cured sprains, 
spavin and shoe boil with "Save-the- 
Horse." It certainly proved marvel- 
ously successful with me, and I do not 
hesitate in recommending It for these 
ailments. Yours truly, 

FRED HAHN, 201 Third St. 
Owner of Addison 2:11%, Waldo .T. 

2:08 and other noted horses. 

LILIENTHAL & CO., 
Beale and Mission Sts. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



G. A. DAVIS, Manager 
Pleasanton 
Telephone Black 75. 

Pleasanton, Cal., Oct. 29. 
In regard to "Save-the-Horse," I used it with much success. The running horse 
Col. Roosevelt, that had broken down in training for two or three years pasl. i.s 
now in good shape and will certainly be able to race as well as ever before. Have 
also used "Save-the-Horse" on the horse Greyfeld with satisfactory results. Will 
also add that I have seen "Save-the-Horse" remove a deep-seated ringbone from a 
Director trotting horse in Monroe Salisbury's stable. 

I am pleased to be able to recommend "Save-the-Horse" from actual experience. 

Yours truly, GEO. A. DAVIS. 

A signed contract goes with every bottle absolutely binding to protect pur- 
chaser. You cannot lose, we take all the chances because we know the power of the 
remedy. We can convince you with evidence; write for letters, booklet and copy 
of guarantee-contract. 

"Save-the-Horse" Permanently Cures Spavin, Ringbone (except low Ringbone). 
Curb, Thoroughpin, Splint, Shoe Boil, Wind l'uff. Injured Tendons and all lameness 
without scar or loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 

$5.00 per Bottle. Written guarantee — as binding to protect you as the best 
legal talent could make it. Send for copy and booklet. At druggists and dealers 
or express paid. 

Troy Chemical Co.: Binghampton, N. Y. Formerly Troy, N. Y. 
D. E. Newell, 56 Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 

"BAG LIMIT" 1 



HAND LOADED SHELLS 

Our own make, and we're proud of them. 

Hand-loaded by our own experts. 

All the leading brands of powder used. 

If you want to strike the "bag limit" use our "Hag Limit" Hand- 
loaded Shells. 

BRITTAIN & CO. Inc. 

Everything in Hardware 

Van Ness Ave. and Turk St. 



u 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 19, 1907. 



RACING! 



New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Racetrack 



Six or more races each week day, rain 
or shine. 



Opening Saturday, November 17. 

Races commence at 1:40 P. M., sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track take S. p. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12 o'clock, thereafter 
every twenty minutes until 1:40 P. M. 
No smoking in last two cars, which are 
reserved for ladies arid their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after 
fifth and last races. 



TEOS. H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 

Seldom See 

a big knee like this, but your horse 
may have a bunch or bruise on his 
Aukle, Hock, Stifle, Knee or Throat. 



RBINE 



AB S0 



will clean them off without laying the 
horse up. No blister, no hair gone. 
$2.00 per bottle, delivered. Book 8-C 
free. ABSORBINR, JR., for mankind. 
$1.00. Removes Soft Bunches, Cure: 
Varicose Veins, Varicocele, Jivdrocelfe, 
Ruptured Muscles or Ligaments, Enlarged 
Glands. Allays Pain. Bud. only by 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 
54 Monmouth Street Springfield, Mass 

For Sale by — 

Langley & Michaels, San Francisco. 
Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Western Wholesale Drug Co., Los 
Angeles, Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sac- 
ramento, Cal.; Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, 
Wash.; Spokane Drug Co., Spokane. 
Wash. 

Turtle's Elixir 

Wellnieh infallible cure for 
Colic, curb, splint, spavin and 
other common horse ail- 
ments. Our long-time stand- 
inn offer of 

$100 Reward 

for failure, where we say it 
will cure, has never been 
claimed. All drntruists sell it 
Tuttle"s Family Elixir, tbe ereat household remedy. 
Tuttle's American Worm Powder cures. American 
Condition Powders, White Star and Hoot Ointment. 
100 page book, "Veterinary Experience," free. Be 
your own horse doctor. Makes plain the symp- 
toms, gives treatment. Send for copy. 
TUTTLES ELIXIR CO.. 52 Beverly St., Boston, Mass. 

Redington & Co., Third St., near Townsend. San Francisco. 
W. A Shaw, I.os Angeles. Calif., Agents. 




I Jurt Enowgrtvj 

and iust as they want it. The right way to 
salt animals is to let them help themselves. 

Compressed 

Pure-Salt Bricks 

inourPatentFeeders.flupplyreflnpddairvBalt. | 
They mean animal thnrt. Tnpy cost bat HtUe. I 
Convenient for you and your I 
animals suffer no neglect. Aeb I 
your dealer and write 03 for | 
booklet. 
Bolmont 
Stable 

w M 



Supply Co. 

Patentees, 11 hm. 

Brooklyn, 
N. V. 



„tt COPA/8^ 



CAPSULES 



Z 



MARE WANTED. 

By McKinney, Zombro, Kinney Lou, 
Greco, Searchlight or Nutwood Wilkes, 
not to exceed seven years old, brown, 
bay or black; sound, good size and 
handsome; trotter with or without rec- 
ord; standard and registered. Answer 
giving full particulars and lowest cash 
price. 

P. W. ZELLET, 

Breeder and Sportsman, 616 Golden 
Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

KINNEY LOU COLT FOR SALE. 

Foaled 1905. Dam by Boodle 2:12%, 
2nd dam by Antevolo 7648, 3rd dam by 
Altamont 3600. For price and further par- 
ticulars call on 

G. B. Blanchard, San Jose, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

ALIX B.. bay mare (record 2:24%) by 
Nutwood Wilkes (2:16%) and out of 
Alberta (by Albert W. 2:20). 

CARLTON W. GREENE, 
873 Eddy Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION FOE 
SALE. 

I have six thoroughbred stallions for 
sale at prices to suit purchasers of 
limited means. No breeder of harness 
horses can afford to go without a thor- 
oughbred horse on his farm for a brood- 
mare sire for getting fine mares for 
dams of high class roadsters. Address 
CAFT. T. B. MERRY, 

549 Grand Ave, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

FOB SALE OB LEASE. 

The well known stallion Milbrae 
2:16% and his two brothers, Portola 
and Menlo Boy. Milbrae is a handsome 
seal brown, 16 hands high and weighs 
1,190 lbs., a horse of excellent disposi- 
tion, splendid conformation and pos- 
sessed of great power and beauty. Mil- 
brae is sired by Prince Airlie, he by 
Guy Wilkes 2:15%, great grand sire 
Geo. Wiles 2:22, first dam Fearless by 
Fallis 2:23, second dam Jean Perault 
by Signal. For further information ap- 
ply to P. H. McEvoy, Menlo Park, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 



£fi IN ?A 



Bay mare Etta B., sire Castella, dam 
Daisy (dam of Walter P. 2:24%). Cas- 
tella has two colts, both show lots of 
speed, but neither has been trained. She 
is a fine saddle mare. Can single-foot 
very fast; weighs 900 pounds. Price $75. 
For further particulars address HOW- 
ARD KERR, 623 J Street, Sacramento, 
California. 



FOR SALE. 

Effie Madison, 16 hands high, sound, 
can trot miles in 2:40, has good action, 
seven years old, a high-class mare. 
Sired by James Madison, first dam 
Lady W. by Ophir. 

Also her two-year-old bay filly by 
Stam B., large sized filly and a good 
prospect. Entered and paid up on in 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes No. 
5, $7,000 guaranteed. Address Wm. E. 
DETELS, Pleasanton, Cal. 



WANTED— TO LEASE. 

A well bred McKinney stallion. Fifty 
per cent of net earnings to the owner. 
First class care taken of horse; can 
give best of references. Good field for 
weil bred stallion. Address 
M. E. LEWIS, 
136 4th St., Eureka, Cal. 

IMPORTED HACKNEY STALLIONS 

At one-half other people's prices. If 
you want bargains write at once to 
R. P. STERICKER, West Orange, N. J. 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co.. San 
Mateo. 

CONCOBD BACE TRACK 

Concord, Contra Costa County, Cal. 

Having leased the above track we 
have made arrangements to break and 
develop trotters and pacers. We have 86 
box stalls and will guarantee to keep 
this track in perfect order. The climate 
is unsurpassed. Owners and trainers are 
cordially invited to visit this course. 
As a winter track Concord is second to 
no other in California. Terms very rea- 
sonable. F. M. HAMMETT and J. E. 
FOSTER, Lessees. 

PASTURAGE. 

Fine pasturage; no wire fencing; 
good box stalls, and best of care given 
horses in any manner that owners may 
desire at reasonable rates. For further 
particulars address 

MRS. CHASE. 

Sonoma, Cal. 

There is only one 
BUBBEBOID ROOFING 
Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 
WE SELL IT. 
BONESTELL, BICHABDSON & CO., 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Biggest Building, Longest Speedway and Best Arena on the Coast 

Auction Sale of 50 Head of Horses 

February 11, 1907 

Such well known and prominent breeders as H. Brace of Santa Clara, K. O'Grady 
of San Mateo, Mr. Thomas Smith of Vallejo, Mr. P. H. McEvoy of Menlo Park and 
Llano Seco Rancho of Butte Co., Cal., have consigned their very best. Positively 
they are as choice a lot as were ever catalogued for a sale, and are broken and 
fit for San Francisco conditions. 

At this sale you will find royally bred stallions, good brood mares, high bred 
youngsters, walk, trot and canter horses, matched teams, business horses, high 
class coach, park and cob teams, fancy drivers, high actors, campaigners, matinee 
horses with two-minute speed and green racing prospects. 

DON'T MISS THIS SALE IF YOU WANT A GOOD HOBSE. 

Our speedway gives chance for horses to show speed, action and manners. Our 
amphitheater seats 1500 people, from any part of which you can see for yourself. 

GET A CATALOGUE with full particulars and he on hand early Monday even- 
ing, February 11th, 1907. 

Fred H. Chase & Co., 478 Valencia St. 

Near Sixteenth Street San Francisco, Cal. 

WRITE| FOR CATALOGUE. 



PAYMENT ON TWO-YEAR-OLDS 

— IN THE — 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 

$7,000 GUARANTEED 
For foals Born 1905 

Races to Take Place 1907 and 1908 

$10 on Each Entry Due February 1st, 1907 

AND MUST BE MADE NOT LATEB THAN THAT DATE. 

$4250 for Trotting Foals. $1750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nomi- 
nators of Dams of Winners and $200 for Owners of Stallions 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



S3000 
200 



1250 
200 



For Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Three-Year-Old Trot. 

For Two-Year-Old Trotters. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Two-Year-Old Trot. 

To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of three-year-old Trot 
when mare was bred. 



S1000 
200 



750 
200 



For Three- Year-Old Facers. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Three-Year-Old Pace. 

Por Two-Year-Old Pacers. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Two-Year-Old Pace. 

To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of three-year-old Pace 
when mare was bred. 



ENTBANCE and PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare OB October 15, L904, when name, 
color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given. $5 February 1, 
1905. $5 September 1, 1905. $10 on yearlings February 1, 190fi. $10 on two- 
year-olds February 1, 1907. $10 on three-year-olds February 1, 1908 

STABTING PAYMENTS — $25 to start in the two-year-old pace $35 to start in t lie 
three-year-old trot. $35 to start in the three-year-old pace. $50 to start in the 
three-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first 
day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators Must Designate When Making Payments to Start Whether the Horse 

Entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 
Colts That Start at Two Years Old Are Not Barred From Starting Again in the 
Three-Year-Old Division 

Make all payments and address communications to the Secretary. 
E. P. HEALD, President. P. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

616 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco. 




Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It im- 
proves and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers 
for it. Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food 
Co., C. P. Kertel, Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE 

DICTATRESS 2:08} 

Handsome chestnut mare by Dictatus, 
dam Salinas Bell by Vermont. Sound 
in every respect; standard and register- 
ed; in foal to Hal B. 2:04%. Will be 
sold for the ' cheap price of $1500 If 
taken at once. Address 

AUGUST EBICKSON, 

Portland, Oregon. 



POSITION WANTED. 

Trainer for a stock farm or with a 
private stable, by a thoroughly compe- 
tent man who has bad IS years' experi- 
ence in the East handling trotters and 
pacers Best of references furnished. 
\ I I i css C. C. PIPEB, Hood Biver, Ore., 
Care W. H. Davis, B. P. D. No. 2. 

AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS 
WANTED EVERYWHERE FOR 
"BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN." 



Saturday, January 19, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



IB 



I 



The Powder That Breaks the Records 



...THE NEW... 



Cjg DU PONT SMOKELESS 



Has Won More High Averages Than All Other Powders Combined 



Preferred by Professional and Amateur Trap Shooters 

Everywhere For Its 

UNIFORMITY, HIGH VELOCITY, EVEN PATTERN, ACCURACY AND REGULARITY 



E. I. Du Pont de Nemours Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 



*x* *** *** *i* *■»■* *■»* *i* *v* *v* *x* *x* *** *x* *v* ■•■v* *v* ' 




ITHACA GUNS 



THIS illustration shows our No. 7 $300 list gun. It is impossible to 
show by a cut the beautiful finish, workmanship and material of this 
grade of gun, it can only be appreciated after you have handled 
an>I examined the gun for yourself. It is fitted with the best Dam- 
ascus or Whitworth Fluid Steel barrels, the finest figured Walnut stock 
that Nature can produce, is hand checkered and engraved in the most 
elaborate manner with dogs and birds inlaid in gold. Send for Art Cata- 
log describing our complete line, 17 grades, ranging in price from $17.75 
net to $300 list. 



Ithaca Gun Company 

Pacific Coast Branch, 1346 Park St. 



Ithaca, N. Y. 

Alameda, Cal. 



GUNS 



FRESH AMMUNITION 




Outing and Rubber Footwear. Good for Wet Weather and Down Town. 

Palace Hardware, 638 Market Street 

Main Store and Office, 458 Golden Oate Ave., San Francisco 

RossMcMahon Aw T n a t nd co. 

AT THE OLD STAND 

Teamsters' Rain Goods, Bags, Tents, Awnings, Hammocks, Covers 
73 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 





GOLCHER BROS. 

Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 

Guns, Fishing Tackle 
Ammunition 
Sporting Goods 
TeJ P t p a r. e 88 3 511 Market St., San Francisco \ 



Why trade off or sell at a beggarly price a good 
horse just because he "goes lame," "throws a 
• curb" or develops some other blemish? There 
is nothing in the way of Spavins, Curbs, Splints, 
Wlndpuffs or Bunches which will not yield 
readily and permanently to treatment with 

QUINN'S 

*»T OINTMENT. 



1> 



. II. imvi ni 
1 hnvc a 

curbs, ■pilots, tiiic 

tho Inst tw.> ream I hnvo not DMO with) 
rashly it differeat time*, sod mv will 
ily of tbo kind 1 buvuovertrlud " 



»rt. n promlm 
«>fl n number 

ipni-d tondom 



it |.h; 



ndli 



or Shprldftn, Ind., 

rthi 



,.n. w.tu 

Htlm 



Mid 1 1 M. Konerrtlly. but ft 
it Qulnn'« Ointment. I hnvo ti-Htcd It tlm 
lit hrmmnrv lliitltls the only rrllftblo rem 
Price S t .00 per bottle. Hold by nil drilKKlBt* 



„UI. 



Wm B. Eddy & Go., Whitehall. N. Y. 



Pointers and 

English Setters 

Trained and Broken 

Broken Docs and Well Bred Puppies 
for sale. Address E. VALENCIA 

212 North Brown St., Napa, Cal. 

FOR SALE — BOSTON TERRIERS. 

A few typical specimens; dark brindle; 
fun pedlgrei B. d. mendenhall, 
41 Clay St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 
TRICOLOR COLLIE PUPS r 

working .stock. Sire Shadeland Random, 
Sir Jan. A. K. C. 100,896 (son of Imp. 

Prince), random collie 

KENNELS, E. C. Rand, Prop., R. F. D. 
No. 2, Box 116, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

BULL TERRIERS. — Pure white, high 
class puppies for sale, sired by Wood- 
lawn Baron, a classy Individual and 
show winner, brother to the winner of 
first and specials at Hull Terrier Breed- 
ers' Show at Philadelphia (at which the 
best In the world were shown). STIL- 
ETTO KENNELS, 225 Alcatraz Avenue. 
Berkeley, Cal. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 19, 1907. 




•t— I» ^- *i- - I - 'I* -I- ■!■ -I. ■!< .1. ■!■ ^.^4^4 ^. ^. »i. .j.^.^..!.^.^.^^^.^..!. .f. » i . . j . ^. ,j. .r. ^. ^. .f. >t. ^. ^- -> ^- .;- .;• •;• •;- 

THE REMINGTON AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN. 



+ 
• 

•• 

>> 




Is the Gun for the Duck and Quail Shooter 

No recoil means increased pleasure; the solid breech means absolute safety; the single barrel means ease in handling. You can afford this modern gun 
because it lists at the moderate price of $40, subject to dealers' discount. Remington Arms Co., Ilion, New York 

The Famous 

= U. M. C.= 

Shotgun Ammunition 

The Union Metallic Cartridge Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut 

H. Justins, Pacific Coast Sales Manager - Sales Office, 925 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal 



Was responsible for tl|e big winnings made at the Western Handicaps held at Denver and Los Angeles, and also for the 
fine bags that are made by duck and quail shooters. 



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i1 * t; i 1 a - 




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Standard Bifle, 20-inoh round nickel steel barrel, pistol grip, stock of plain walnut, not checked, weig-ht about 7?4 pounds, number of shots, six, LIST Price, $28.00 

This new rifle, which has the thoroughly tried and satisfactory Winchester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge powerful enough for the largest game. The 
soft point bullet mushrooms splendidly on animal tissue, tearing a wide, killing path. With a metal patched bullet this rille will shoot through a '4 -inch steel 
plate. The Model 1907 is a six-shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and simple and strong in construction. It is a serviceable, handy gun from 
butt to muzzle. There are no moving projections on the outside of the gun to catch in the clothing or tear the hands, and no screws or pins to shake loose. It is 
easily loaded and unloaded; easily shot with great rapidity and easily taken down and cleaned. List price, $28.00. The retail price is lower. Ask your dealer to 
show you this gun. Send for circular fully describing this rifle. 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Smith Hammerless and Ejector Guns 



Also Hunter One Trigger 



Won This Year's Grand 

American Handicap 

268 Competitors 

Also Won Grand Eastern 
Handicap 

(Hunter One Trigger) 




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Hunter Arms Co., - - Fulton, N. Y. 
PHIL. B. BEKEART, CO., Inc. 

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2 



THE BR EEDER AND SPOR TSMAN 



[Saturday, January 26, 1907. 



Bon Voyage 



Highland C. 



Champion 2 year old Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 year old Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Record ... .2:12 ?4 
Timed in a Race 2:10*4 

WINNER OP HARTFORD FUTURITY ($8500) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% is by Expedition 2:15% (sire of Biflora 2:09V4, Ex- 
ton 2:10%, and 50 others in 2:30 list), son of Electioneer 125 and Lady Russell 
(sister to Maud S. 2:08% and dam of 5 in 2:30 list), by Harold 113. The dam of 
Bon Voyage is Bon Mot (dam of Bon Voyage 2:12%, Endow 2:14% and Bequeath 
2:20%), by Erin 2:24%; second dam Farce 2:29%, by Princeps 536; third dam 
Roma (dam of Farce 2:29%, Romance 2:29%. and Guyon 2:27%), by Golddust 50; 
fourth dam Bruna (dam of Woodford Pilot 2:22%), by Pilot Jr. 12. 

Season of 1907 at PLEASANT ON RACE TRACK. 

where he will be limited to twenty outside mares. 
"R^fl fnr ihf> Cnqcnn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded 
•puv iui l lie ^IdSUII should mare not prove in foal. A rare chance to breed 
good mares to an exceptionally high-class and highly bred young stallion. 

2:19 TRIAL 2:12 

(At Pour Years Old) 

Bred at Highland Farm, Dubuque, Iowa 

By EXPRESSO 29199 (half brother to Expressive (3) 2:12%) by Advertiser 
2:15%, son of Electioneer 125; dam ALPHA 2-.23V& (dam of Aegon 2:18%. sire of 
Ageon Star 2:11%, etc.) by Alcantara by George Wilkes 2:22; second dam Jessie 
Pepper (dam of 2 in list and 3 producing sons and 7 producing daughters) by Mam- 
brlno Chief 11, etc. 

Terms, $25 For the Season 

HIGHLAND is a grand looking young stallion, eight years old. His breeding 
is most fashionable and his immediate ancestors are producers of race winners with 
fast records. He is beautifully gaited and has a perfect disposition. Does not 
pull or want to break at speed, and can be placed at will in a bunch of horses. He 
is a high-class horse and has better than 2:10 speed, and has trotted a quarter in 
31 seconds over the Pleasanton race track. 

HIGHLAND is a coal black horse with one white hind ankle, stands 16.1 hands 
high and weighs close to 1200 pounds. 

Tha above Stallions, owned by W. A. Clark Jr., will make a public season. Both 
are entered in the Horse World Stallion Representative Stake for three-year-olds, 
and all their fcals will be eligible to this rich event, with nothing to pay until the 
year of the race. 

Address all communications to 

J. O. Gerrety, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 

i _• ^ «— *^ mm ^"v By J. J. Audubon 

Audubon Boy 1 :59 * ilsIP 

DAM, FLAXY (dam of Audubon Boy 1:59%, Royal R. Sheldon 2:04%, Red Elm 
2:16% and grandam of Simon Kenton 2:13% and Mary Louise 2:27%), by Bourbon 
Wilkes 2345 (sire of Coastman 2:08%, Split Silk 2:08%, Sunland Belle 2:08%, etc.), 
he by George Wilkes 2:22, out of Favorite 2:35% (dam of 1 and five sires of 135 
in 2:30), by Abdallah 15. Flaxy's dam was Kit, by Clark Chief 89 (sire of 6 and 
dame of 35); second dam Nelly by Grey Denmark. J. J. Audubon 16695 was by 
Alcyone 2:27, out of Dolly Pomeroy (dam of Miss Pomeroy 2:22% and J. J. Audu- 
bon 1:59%), by Highland Grey 2:28 (sire of 8, including Highland L. 2:14%); 
second dam, Nelly 

First and only horse whose entire racing career (56 heats) averages 2:0s 1 ,. 

First and only horse at 5 years to pace twice in one day in 2:03 1 4 , winning race. 

First and only horse to pace in 2:00 1 4 , first trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59 '4, second trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace to the half in 57^ seconds. 

First and only horse to pace to the three-quarter in 1:27*2. 

First and only horse to pace in l^!} 1 ^, first trial second year. 

First and only horse to pace again in 2:00, same week, same year. 

First and only horse to pace twice in 2:00 in one week. 

All of the above without the aid of wind or dust shield and all under unfavor- 
able conditions, the most unfavorable of all being when he paced in 1:59%, 
WILL STAND AT AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES. TO 
A FEW GOOD MARES. 
TERMS — $100 for the Season. $150, with return privilege or money refunded as 
I may choose. For further particulars address 

J. Y. GATCOMB, 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 



THE STANDARD BRED STALLION 



Two-year-old record, 2:15 3 4 . 
By Diablo 2:0S 1 4 . Sire of 
Six In 2:10 list. 



iUcFadyen 2:1 SJ 

Dam, Bee (dam of McFadyen (2) 2:15%, Friskarina (3) 2:13%, and Monroe B. 
2:15%), by Sterling 6223 (son of Egmont, dam Mary by Flaxtail); second dam Flash 
(dam of Javelin 2:08%. Flare Up 2:14, Sally Derby 2:17%, Walker 2:23%, etc.), by 
Egmont; third dam Lightfoot by Flaxtail 8132. 

Will make the Season of 1907 at my ranch at Dixon, Cal. 

Excellent pasturage at $2.50 per month and the best of care taken of mares. 
TERMS — $40 for the Season. E. D. DUDLEY, Dixon, Cal. 

Mendocino 22607 

RECORD (THREE-YEAR-OLD) 2:191/2 

Sire of Monte Carlo 2:07% (to wagon 2:08%); Mendolita 2:07%, Idolita (2 y. o.) 
2:21%, (3 y. o.) 2:12, (a) 2:09%; Leonora 2:12%. Polka Dot 2:14%, etc. Bay stallion. 
15.3% hands; weight 1190 pounds; hind feet and ankles white; foaled April 24, 
1889. Bred at Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Sire. ELECTIONEER 125, s.m < > f 1 I a in 1 > h-lon ian 1». First dam, MANO idam 
of Mendocino (3) 2:19%, Electant 2:19%, Morocco (3 y. o. trial 2:22), by Piedmont 
904, 2:17%; second dam, Mamie (dam of Mamie W. (3) 2:17%, Hyperion 2:21%, 
Memento 2:25%, Mithra (p) 2:11%), by Hambletonian Jr. 1882; third darn, Gilda 
(thoroughbred) by itnp. Mango. 

MENDOCINO is one of Electioneer's youngest and best sons. With very limited 
opportunities in the stud he has proven his worth by producing such racehorses as 
Monte Carlo and Idolita. Two new additions to his 2:30 list were made last season 
and he -now has twelve standard performers. His foals are good size, fine lookers, 
bold and pure gaited and easily developed. 

SERVICE PEE for Season of 1907, $75; usual return privilege. 



By McKinney 2:11%; 
Dam Helena Z-.W 1 /*. 



iHcKena 39460 

Brown Stallion, 16.2 hands; weight 1350 pounds; foaled April 11, 1900. Bred 
at Palo Alto Stork Farm. Sire, McKINNEY 8818 i rcrord 2:11V,). First dam. 
HELENA 2:11»4 (dam of Wildnutling 2:11%, Dobbel '.':22, Hyita (trial 2:12), by 
Electioneer 125; second dam. Lady Ellen 2:29% (dam of six in list, including Helena 
2:11%, Ellen Wood 2:14%), by Mambrino 1789; third dam, Ida May Jr. by Owen 
Dale; fourth dam, Ida May by Belmont (Williamson's). 

* McKENA has proven a remarkably sure foal getter. He should make a great 
sire as he is a fine individual and bred right. His sire. McKinney, a game and fast 
racehorse and sire of game and fast racehorses. His dam, Helena, one of the fastest 
and gamest daughters of Electioneer, the greatest sire of trotters the world has yet 
known. His second dam, Lady Ellen, was one of the best of her day, and as well as 
her daughter Helena is a great broodmare. 

SERVICE FEE for Season of 1907. S40; usual return privilege. 



MENDOCINO and McKENA wil ke the isoi at PALO ALTO STOCK 
FARM. Mares may run on pasture at $7.50 per month. No responsibility assumed 
by the Palo Alto Stock Farm for injury or escapes. Address all communications to 

PALO ALTO STOCK FARM. 

Stanford University, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



Beyond All Question 

As a phenominaBy uniform transmitter of his own supreme 
inheritance, 

"McKINNEY" 2:11 

stands apart by himself as a "flock of one." If you are 
interested in rapid horse-flesh the records of a lot of his 
offspring deserve your examination. Shall we send them? 

The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



Exceptional Opportunity 

Is offered to a few horsemen who appreciate a business-like 
proposition. 

"AXWORTHY" 3 2:15 

has so many wonderfully bred colts that are heavily engaged 
in futurities that his immediate future will greatly surpass 
his remarkable past. Let us tell you. 

SoVihisjoS The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N.Y. 



JAMES A. GROVE 



(R. R. Syer, Atty.) 



WILLIAM G. TORLEY 



LAWRENCE STOCK FARM 

HIGH CLASS HORSES BOUGHT AND SOLD. BROOD MARES CARED 
FOR AND BRED ACCORDING TO INSTRUCTIONS 

Futurity Stake Candidates and Candidates for the M. and M. and C. of C. 
Stakes Developed. Patronage and Correspondence Solicited. 

LAWRENCE STOCK FARM, Lawrence, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



AIR CUSHION 
PADS 



No lameness 



They til I with ait at each step. 
That's what breaks concussion 
That's what prevents slipping. 
That's what keeps the foot 

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No Breeder Can Afford 
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—Price Reduced— 

$4 in Cloth $5 in Leather 

To Be Purchased From 
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From The Author, Capt. T. B. Merry 
549 Grand Ave.. Los Angeles, Cal. 


The American 
Thoroughbred 


The Result of 50 Years of Close Study 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Hater Sts., just at tile Panhandle Kntrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 

Best located and healthiest stahle in San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand 
for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare 
horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stable anil not have their horses frightened 
by autos or cars. 



San Francisco Riding Club 



ANNEX FOB DRIVING HORSES. 

55 Stalls on Ground Floor; 

5 Exits. Perfect facilities for safety 

and the proper care of Horses. 



OPEN FOR PUBLIC PATRONAGE. 

While this Stahle is under the Man- 
agement of San Francisco Riding 
Club, it is not ezclnsive for the use 
of Members. 



Iff 



Apply for Further Information to SAN FRANCISCO RIDING CLUB. 

Seventh Avenue and C Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 26, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

Breeder and Sportsman 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLBT, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 
OFFICE: 616 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms— One Year $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A COMPLETE SUCCESS followed the calling of a 
convention to meet at Pleasanton last Saturday to 
consider the organization of a California Circuit of 
harness racing for 1907. Sixteen tracks and asso- 
ciations were represented and an organization per- 
fected that will not rest until dates are agreed upon 
and purses announced. It looks now as though the 
aggregate of purses and stakes offered for trotters 
and pacers in California this year will be very 
close to $100,000 and probably more than that. The 
plan to start at Los Angeles or San Bernardino, 
come up the Coast, and, after racing at all the prin- 
cipal points around the bay and Sacramento, to re- 
turn by way of the San Joaquin valley met the ap- 
proval of horsemen generally and of the fair associa- 
tions and track managers also. The Executive 
Committee of the Circuit has already met and ar- 
ranged dates for this Circuit, and submitted it to 
the different associations for their approval. There 
may be a few unimportant changes, but it will finally 
be made up on very nearly the dates selected, as 
the majority have already expresses their satisfac- 
tion at the arrangement. The next thing after final 
fixing of dates is the arranging and announcement 
of purses and dates of closing. This will be done 
early. We believe the Breeders' Association, the 
State Fair, the Sonoma County Fair, Los Angeles 
and other associations will be ready to announce 
purses by March 1st, and the other associations will 
not be far behind them. We can say truthfully to 
every horse owner and trainer in California that the 
California Circuit has progressed beyond the hot- 
air stage and the outlook for three or four months' 
of racing this summer is very bright. 



A DEBT OF GRATITUDE is due from every horse 
breeder and especially from every writer on harness 
horse affairs to Walter T. Chester, who writes over 
the nom de plume of "Griffin," for the American 
Horse Breeder. He is beyond all question the most 
untiring worker and the most indefatigable compiler 
of statistics relating to trotting and pacing horses 
that ever lived. Since he published Chester's Trot- 
ting Register many years ago he has been keeping 
records and printing statistical tables of untold value 
to all who are interested in the breeding and de- 
velopment of the light harness horse. And with all 
his delving and compiling he ha S n o particular 
theories to advance, but seems content to furnish 
the facts and figures and let the others try to prove 
their theories by them. His last contribution is a 
table of sires that have produced directly or through 
sons and daughters fifty standard performers. From 
it the turf writers will be able to get material for 
articles for months to come. Hats off to "Griffin," 
gentlemen of the turf press. He is the one man of 
all others we turn to for figures to support our 
theories. 



DOCKING HORSES in the State of California is 
to be a misdemeanor if a bill introduced by Senator 
Curtin of Tuolumne passes and receives the sanc- 
tion of the Governor. According to this bill it will 
be unlawful for any one to dock the tail of a horse, 
or to import or bring into the State any docked 
horse, other than stallions brought in for exhibi- 
tion or breeding purposes. Within thirty days after 
the passage of this measure, every owner or user of 
any docked horse shall register the animal, by filing 
with the County Clerk a certificate containing a 
full description. The driving or using of an un- 
registered, docked horse after sixty days from pas- 
sage of the act shall be deemed prima facie evi- 
dence that the driver or user docked the said of 
said horse. The bill provides for sufficient punish- 
ment to cause the practice to be discontinued. 



AMONG those who attended the convention at 
Pleasanton last Saturday was Mr. Edward M. Hum- 
phrey, one of the new owners and manager of the 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm, where so many of Cali- 
fornia's famous horses have been bred. Mr. Hum- 
phrey is a strong advocate of a circuit of California 
fairs, and the action of the convention met his ap- 
proval in every way. He reported the horses all 
in fine shape on the big farm and will soon announce 
a sale of colts and fillies. 



A BILL has been prepared and is to be intro- 
duced at the present session of the California Legis- 
lature dividing the State into six agricultural dis- 
tricts and providing an appropriation for each with 
which an annual fair is to be conducted. We have 
not seen a draft of the bill yet, and until we do 
cannot express an opinion on it. 



DEATH OF FRANK MALONE. 

Once more the grim reaper, Death, has entered 
the ranks of the California pioneer horsemen. On 
Thursday of last week Francis S. Malone passed 
away, his last hours being spent in a tent on the 
corner of Steiner street and Duboce avenue, which, 
with his faithful and loving wife, he had occupied 
since the fire following the earthquake of April 18th 
last- destroyed their home and personal property. 
Mr. Malone came to California in 1849, prior to 
which time he served as a soldier in the Mexican 
War. He was born in Memphis, Tenn., seventy-six 
years ago, and had been a very active man all his 
life, being ill but a few days before his death. He 
made and lost two fortunes in mining ventures and 
died possessed of little of this world's goods, but left 
an unsullied name and the most tender and loving 
memories in the hearts of those who knew him. 

He was a great lover of and had been an extensive 
breeder of horses. He brought to this State the 
mare Fanny Wickham by imported Herald, bred her 
to Niagara and got Fanny Malone, which he in turn 
bred to Electioneer and got a filly which he after- 
wards sold to Samuel Gamble, who named her Kitty 
G., now known as the dam of Klatawah 2:05% at 
three years, Chas. Derby 2:20, now premier at Oak- 
wood Park Stock Farm, and other noted horses. 

Mr. Malone was one of the very first of California 
horsemen to send mares to Senator Stanford's Palo 
Alto farm, and he picked them well. He sent Fanny 
Malone to Electioneer and got Katy G. as stated. 
He also sent to be mated with General Benton, 
Nettie George, a thoroughbred mare by Nor- 
folk, and got Miss Helen, the dam of Lena N. 
2:05% and many others. 

For several years past Mr. Malone had been in 
very poor circumstances, but he kept a bold and 
cheerful front and none ever heard him complain. 
He looked forward with great hope to making an- 
other fortune before he crossed the great river that 
he might leave the aged partner of his joys and sor- 
rows free from want or need. But death overtook 
him, and after a very short illness he passed beyond. 
May the turf rest lightly on him. 

o 

BREEDING WANTED. 



Mr. W. T. Silliman of Watsonville would like to 
ascertain the breeding of the mare. Little Miss 2:17% 
by Sidmoor. Mr. Siljiman purchased her from J. 
Alviso of Pleasanton, who got her from George Mar- 
tin, who worked for Lee Shaner, the former owner of 
Sidmoor. The breeding as given to Mr. Alviso when 
he bought her was by Sidmoor, first dam by son of 
Electioneer, second dam by Billy Hayward, third 
dam thoroughbred. As Mr. Silliman owns three fillies 
from this mare, one by Searchlight 2: 03% and two 
by Welcome 2:10%, he would like to register her 
if possible, and would be very thankful for any in- 
formation from Mr. George Martin or anyone else 
who can Rive him any particulars. 

o 

GREAT YOUNG COLT GOES TO DENVER. 



Martin Carter, owner of Nutwood Stock Farm, 
sold this week to Mr. J. M. Herbert of Denver, Colo., 
a handsome two-year-old by the great race trotter 
Kinney Lou 2:07%, dam Queen C. 2:28%' by Nutwood 
Wilkes; second dam Queen by Venture 2:27, sire 
of the dam of Directum 2:05%. This is not only a 
handsome colt but he is royally bred and gives 
every promise of being a very fast trotter. The 
McKinney-Nutwood Wilkes cross has been a success 
every time it has been tried, and this youngster is 
no exception to the rule. Mr. Herbert is to be con- 
gratulated on getting such a good one. 



BIG PURSES AT PETALUMA FAIR. 



Mr. H. Stover, owner of the Petaluma Fair 
Grounds, will soon announce a big program of races 
for a fair to be held in August of this year. He 
will give at least four $1,000 stakes and many smaller 
purses for harness races, and will offer big prizes 
for cattle, sheep, hogs and all breeds of horses. The 
Petaluma Fail- will follow the Pacific Coast Trotting 
Horse Breeders' Association's meeting, which is to 
be held at Santa Rosa this year and at which about 
$15,000 in stakes and purses will be distributed 
among the horsemen. 



TWO PALO ALTO STALLIONS. 

The only stallions remaining on Palo Alto Stock 
Farm are Mendocino 2:19% by Electioneer, and Mc- 
Kena, a magnificent son of McKinney 2: 11*4 and 
Helena 2:11% by Electioneer. They will both be 
in the stud this year and will stand for service at 
the same fees asked last season, $75 for Mendocino 
and $40 for McKena. 

Mendocino is the sire of Monte Carlo 2:07%, of 
Idolita 2:09% and of Leonora 2:12%, all great trot- 
ters, and last season added a very fast pacer, Men- 
dolita 2:07%, to his list. Mendocino is a grandly 
formed horse, one that transmits his size and great 
muscular development as well as fine quality to his 
progeny. His dam is a great brood mare by that 
game race horse Piedmont 2:17%, his second dam 
another great brood mare by Hambletonian Jr. 1882, 
and his third dam a high-class thoroughbred mare. 

McKena is a brown horse 16.2 hands, weighing 1350 
pounds and is now 7 years old. He is by the greatest 
of all sires of extreme trotting speed, McKinney 
2:11%, and his dam is that good race mare Helena 
2:11%, now the dam of Wild Nutting 2:11% and 
Dobbel 2:22, by Electioneer, second dam the great 
brood mare Lady Ellen 2:29%, dam of six in the 
list, by Carr's Mambrino, sire of the dam of Sweet 
Marie, third dam by Owen Dale and fourth dam by 
Williamson's Belmont. The breeding of McKena is 
very much like that of Sweet Marie, except that he 
has an Electioneer cross through his first dam. 
During the past two years he has been bred to a 
good many outside mares, and quite a number of 
his get are entered in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity, 
Occident and Stanford Stakes. That he will sire 
speed is certain as he is bred in speed lines on 
both sides. 

o 

The Pleasanton Times handed Jos. Neal, horse 
center's Nasby, the following in its last issue: "When 
you horse guys who are new in Pleasanton go to the 
Postofflce to get letters from your absent wives and 
sweethearts you perhaps don't realize that the man 
behind the counter who deals out the sealed love 
dope has been to the ball when they were all dancing. 
You might think the man who wears the glasses 
knows a lot about where your best girl lives, but 
you never would guess he knew the difference be- 
tween a trot and a pace. But he does, you know. Joe 
Neal was Salisbury's manager and secretary when 
the turf king was racing a stable of horses that was 
more like a circus than a racing stable. A little 
matter of two or three carloads of horses and twenty 
men or so, and the arrival of Salisbury's string at a 
track was an event to be talked of half way across 
a State, and the first break a visitor at the track 
would make, after passing through the gate, would 
be to see the great California horses that every- 
body was talking about. Joe was the man that at- 
tended to the shipping. Joe was the man that looked 
out that the horses had feed. Joe was the man that 
attended to the entering of the horses in their 
classes through a circuit. Joe was the man who col- 
lected the winnings, and Joe was the wise guy who 
always provided a good place for the men to board, 
and last but not least, Joe was the man who admin- 
istered bromo-seltzer to the stable boys after cele- 
brating too frequent victories and brought them all 
back to Pleasanton safe and sound when the racing 
season was over, to begin again for the next year." 



William G. Layng, who went East January 2d 
with the intention of staying three months, writes 
us that he will be back about February 10th. He 
is now in Philadelphia, but will go over to New York 
to attend the Fasig-Tipton Midwinter sale, which 
opens January 29th. 



King Entertainer 2:11% has filled out wonderfully 
since reaching California, and Is a mighty good 
looking trotting stallion now. He was much admired 
by the visitors at Pleasanton track last Saturday. 



The warning has been made many times, but it 
will do no harm to repeat it and say that money 
should never be sent through the mails in unregis- 
tered letters. It is too risky. When making pay- 
ments in the colt stakes get a draft or money order, 
and don't put notes or greenbacks loose in a letter. 
They get lost too often for any careful person to 
take such chances. 



Mr. A. P. Church, the well known horseshoer of 
Pleasanton track, has sold his yearling filly by Bon- 
nie McK, out of Winnie by Antrim to Mr. J. A. 
Grove, proprietor of Lawrence Stock Farm. This 
filly is a trotter of the most promising sort for 
a baby and should develop into a fast one. 



Geo. T. Beckers, owner of the great Zombro 2:11, 
expects to ship the stallion north from Los Angeles 
in the early part of February, and is now contem- 
plating locating at Woodland or Sacramento. Due 
notice will be given in these columns of the place 
at which this son of McKinney will stand. Zombro 
is in lme shape, and Mr. Beckers receives letters 
every day nearly requesting him to take Zombro 
to some point east of the Mississippi river, but is 
compelled to answer that California is good enough 
for him and the horse to live in. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 26, 1907. 



A A A A A A A A A AAA A A AA A » AA _». A A A A A A A AAA A 

* r * * V ~" TYT ** » V *£• *«* *i* W *i* V *S* * * *»* "t* V W V *f* 

| NOTES AND NEWS | 

v *** *** *»* •*•*»**** *■•* *J* *J* *•* *■** *5* *5* *2* *$* *** *2* *»* *J* *5* *J* *** *3******* **«* *** *** *»* *■»* *I* *** *#■* *%* *** 

California will have a circuit this year. 



The start made at Pleasanton last Saturday was 
a good one. 



Dates and purses will be announced by March 1st 
for a dozen or more meetings. 



The State Board of Agriculture will meet at Sac- 
ramento, February 23d, at which time a race pro- 
g-am for 1907 will be arranged. 



The Buffalo Driving Club, according to Secretary 
Bontley, will offer a ten-thousand-dollar stake for 
pacers. This, with the ten-thousand-dollar stake 
for 2:10 trotters, he will christen the "Twin Stakes." 



The Canadian ice record for pacers is now 2:14 
made by the black gelding Blackbird at Port Perry. 
January 11th. 



There is no better way to get buyers to inquire 
about that horse jou wish to sell than by i lacing 
an advertisement in the Breeder and Sportsman. 



Three-year-old races in Russia are limited to 
dashes of three-quarters of a mile, except in big 
stakes when heats are allowed. 



No horse show will be held in Boston this year as 
many of the exhibitors who usually make extensive 
exhibits will cross the ocean with their horses to 
attend the International Show in London. 



Frank Smith of Boston, manager of the Crabtree 
stable, went to Lexington. Ky., a few days ago and 
ordered Nut Boy 2:07% and My Star 2:03$; shipped 
to Savannah, Ga., where their preparation for a trip 
down the Grand Circuit will commence. Frank 
Smith's brother, Charles, has been jogging the horses 
since the close of the Lexington meeting and they 
are strong and fat. 



Mr. T. G. Kaesemayer of Effle, Washington, recent- 
ly purchased that very handsome and high class 
young stallion Guy Falcon by Zombro. 



Farmer Bunch bought the bay pacing mare Hattie 
Croner 2:16% last week for Mr. J. C. Smith of Rich- 
mond, Va. This mare is by Bay Bird out of a 
mare by Algona that is an own sister to the dam 
of Anaconda 2:01%. Mr. Bunch will race this mare 
and other horses over the half-mile tracks of Penn- 
sylvania and Virginia. 



George Maben, who now has five head of trotters 
and pacers in his care, is thinking of opening a 
public stable at Tulare. He has trained and given 
records to many horses although he has not been 
an active trainer for the past few years. Among 
those that he has handled are that fast pacer Jakey 
lOinstein 2:21% by Sultan, that he won a yearling 
stake with at Santa Ana in 1893, and then sold him 
to Andy McDowell for $1000. He also drove Pomona 
to a record of 2:22 at the same meeting and reduced 
his record to 2:15 the following year. McZeus, the 
first McKinney to take a standard record, was also 
trained and driven by George Maben, who won three 
races out of three starts with him in 1893 and gave 
him a record of 2:29%, which he afterwards reduced 
to 2:13. He also handled and won races with Gen. 
Wiles 2:15, Native State 2:16%, Ketchum 2:16%, 
Our Lucky 2:16%, Gen. Beverly 2:22 and others, 
and is an excellent man with trotters or pacers. 
He has worked colts for years under his brother, 
Walter Maben, the noted reinsman. 



The Western Horseman of January 18th, says: 
"Down at the May wood Stock Farm is a full sister 
to the mare Sonoma Girl, which surprised the turf 
world by trotting a mile on Christmas Day at the 
Los Angeles track in 2:07. This mare, called Sonoma 
May, is six years old and is by Lynwood W. 2:20%, 
and her dam is by Anteeo. She is owned by a Cali- 
fornian and Millard Sanders brought her over with 
the Sidney Dillon colts last spring. As a four-year- 
old she was worked a mile in 2:15%, but last year 
Sanders did not do much with her, as he did not 
plan to race any horses and preferred to keep So- 
noma May for her six-year-old form. She is a hand- 
some brown mare, 15.2% hands high and weighs 
1050 pounds. Sanders thinks that she is a great 
prospect, good enough to be considered for the M. 
and M. He is particularly interested in her because 
he gave her sire a two-year-old record of 2:20% in 
California. As a four-year-old Lynwood W. was 
brought East by John Goldsmith and worked a mile 
in 2:09% over the Cleveland track. At Buffalo he 
was injured while being unloaded from a car and 
was not raced. Lynwood W. put three in the list 
last year— Charley Benden 2:08%, R. W. P. 2:13%, 
and Sonoma Star 2:30. That Sonoma May is a 
handsome mare is evident from the fact that she 
won two blue ribbons at the last Indiana State 
Fair." 

o 

TO CUBE A COLD IN ONE DAY 

Take LAXATIVE BROMO Quinine Tablets. Drug- 
gists refund money if it fails to cure. E. W. GROVE'S 
signature is on each box. 25c. 



Horace W. Wilson, secretary of the Kentucky 
Breeders' Association, is in New York City on a 
visit and has set all Broadway guessing with a 
story of a green horse that paced a mile in 2:05 
over a half-mile track. 



One day last week Mr. J. B. Iverson of Salinas 
sold his twenty-months-old Searchlight gelding to 
Mr. E. R. Dunn, a wealthy Alaskan miner, who makes 
his headquarters at Seattle. The youngster has been 
nicely broken by Chas. Whitehead, in whose stable 
at the Salinas track he has been for the past three 
months. Mr. Dunn paid $400 for the youngster and 
has put him in Henry Helman's charge at Pleasan- 
ton. He is a big strong colt, a square trotter and 
has already shown a three-minute gait. He is en- 
tered in the Breeders' Futurity and the Occident 
Stake. 



Worthington Parsons of Salinas has sent to Henry 
Helman a four-year-old mare by McKinney that has 
worked a mile a shade better than 2:18. She will 
be trained on the Pleasanton track and Helman may 
have another 2:10 trotter for McKinney's list. 



Grace Kaiser, the great brood mare by Kaiser, son 
of George Wilkes, that is to be sold at the dispersal 
sale of the horses owned by the late James Coffin, 
was the first mare to produce a standard performer 
by McKinney. This was McZeus, that took a trot- 
ting record of 2:29% as a two-year-old in 1893 and 
afterwards reduced his record to 2:13. Grace Kaiser 
has since produced Coney 2:02, McKinney's fastest 
pacer, and the trotter Grace McK. 2:21%, also by 
McKinney. Bred to Titus, brother to Direct, she 
produced the pacer Stipulator 2:11%. Her two-year- 
old filly by Zolock 2:05%, to be sold at the same 
sale, is one of the greatest prospects in California 
for a t wo-minute pacer. 



Charles Whitehead has received at the Salinas 
race track two fine McKinney's, the property of John 
Rowan of Stockton. They are a full brother and 
sister, both being by the greatest of living trotting 
sires, McKinney 2:11%, out of a mare by St. Nicholas, 
a son of Sidney. The stallion is named Mechanic, 
is eight years old, a jet black, without a white hair, 
and can show very fast at the trot for the small 
amount of handling he has had. Until now he has 
been handled entirely by his owner. The mare is six 
years old, and is said to be fully as good a prospect 
as the horse. Trainer Whitehead feels sure that in 
these two McKinneys he has the real goods, and ex- 
pects to have "all the railbirds talking" before the 
circuit opens. — Salinas Journal. 



The Horseman and Spirit of the Times Futurity 
announced in this issue, has many special features 
worthy of the attention of all breeders of light har- 
ness horses. The guaranteed value of this stake 
is $15,000, making it the richest of all newspaper 
Futurities, and this amount does not represent the 
limit, as every dollar paid in over and above the 
guarantee will be added to the stake and divided 
among the winners. The last Horseman Futurity 
amounted to more than $20,000 and the amount 
iruaranteed was but $12,500. To engage a colt in 
this rich stake costs no more than to enter in many 
events of much less value. The first payment is 
only $5.00, and to carry the colt to the year of the 
race costs only $15.00, exactly one-tenth of one per 
cent. Full paid up entrance of starters is about two 
l>er cent. The breeder has everything to gain and 
nothing to lose. His money's worth is assured at 
every corner. If the nominated mare does not pro- 
duce a foal, the first payment is not lost, for another 
mare and foal may be substituted in November. If 
a three-year-old wants to pace, the $15.00 Is not 
lost, for there is a $4000 race for pacers. This is 
not at the expense of the trotting colt, for the trot- 
ters race for $11,000. The winners of the trotting 
division can carry home $3500 and the pacing win- 
ners $2500. The race is for three heats, enough to 
assure a horse race in which class will tell and no 
possibility of a gruelling contest. The Horseman 
and Spirit of the Times cannot make one penny 
profit on this stake, but must bear the expense of 
advertising and promoting. To insure fairness the 
full list of entries will be printed as received, and 
will be easy for nominators to keep track of the 
amount paid in. Every mare on the farm deserves 
to be entered. Entries close Saturday, March 2d. 



The Woodland Fair Association desires to give six 
days racing this year, beginning Monday, September 
2d, and ending Saturday. September 7th. The State 
Fair has announced its dates as September 7th to 
14th. inclusive, thus taking in two Saturdays, but 
the Woodland Association may induce the State 
Board to forego the first Saturday and open the 
State Fair on Monday, September 9th. which is Ad- 
mission Day. If the Occident Stake were made the 
leading feature of Monday, the fact that this is the 
richest stake for three-year-old trotters on the Coast, 
and the further fact that being a legal holiday a 
very large crowd would attend on the 9th, would 
make a very auspicious opening day for the State 
Fair. 



Farmer Bunch has quite a reputation as a talker, 
but when called upon for a speech at the banquet ten- 
dered the delegates and visiting horsemen at Pleas- 
anton last Saturday, arose, blushed, thanked the 
toastmaster for the honor, begged to be excused, and 
sat down. Charley De Ryder leaned over and whis- 
pered to his neighbor: "The Farmer has broken 
another record." 



There are only three stallions in the world that 
have records below 2:00 and two of these are stand- 
ing for service in California this year — Star Pointer 
at Pleasanton and Audubon Boy at Los Angeles, both 
having marks of 1:59%. 



Dan Thomas of Paris, Kentucky, has sold to W. W. 
Evans of Lexington the seven-year-old pacer Grey 
Ghost by Wiggins for $5000. This gelding is said 
to be the fastest green pacer on earth, as he paced 
a trial mile in 2:04 last year at Columbus. 



In the table of drivers who have driven trotters 
into the 2:10 list, printed in the American Horse 
Breeders' Christmas edition and copied by many 
other journals since, Millard Sanders was given 
credit for putting but four — Lou Dillon 1:58%, Dollv 
Dillon 2:06%, Tom Axworthy 2:07 and Janice 2:08% 
— in this exclusive list. Millard should have credit 
for another, making five, as he drove Anzella 2:06% 
to her record. 



Barney Simpson will take his grand horse Arner 
2:17% to Chico again for the stud season and will 
reach there early next month. Arner is considered by 
many horsemen the best individual of the family of 
full brothers and sisters, which include Don Derby 
2:04%, Derbertha 2:07%. Diablo 2:09%, De- 
monio 2:11% and Arner 2:17%. There is not an- 
other such a family of pacers in the world as these 
five. 



Bert Webster was kept busy by the many visitors 
at Pleasanton track last Saturday who wanted to 
see the old champion race horse Star Pointer 1:59%, 
the first harness horse to beat two minutes. Star 
Pointer certainly looks in the very pink of condi- 
tion, and Bert pulled his blanket off with pardon- 
able pride a dozen or more times during the fore- 
noon. 



Almaden 2:22% by Direct 2:05%, out of Rose 
McKinney by McKinney is now in Charles De 
Ryder's string at Pleasanton. "He looks more like 
his dad every day." 



Everybody that went to Pleasanton last week 
wanted to look at Mr. W. A. Clark Jr.'s stallion, Bon 
Voyage, whose record of 2:15% as a two-year-old 
and 2:12% as a three-year-old were the fastest of 
the years when they were made. Mr. Gerrety had 
the groom take the blanket off the son of Expedition 
2:15% many times during the forenoon, and the 
general expression was that a grander looking trot- 
ting stallion had never been seen at this famous 
stamping ground for great horses. Bon Voyage is 
five years old this year, and is filling out into a very 
strong, muscular fellow, with great finish. His stable 
companion. Highland C. 2:19%, was also much ad- 
mired, and those who saw his yearlings were much 
impressed with him as a sire. 



John Quinn, who is training a string of horses at 
the Sacramento track, went over to Santa Rosa this 
week and took back to the Capital City the fine 
mare Ayeress by Lynwood W. 2:20, out of May 
Ayers 2:23%, owned by H. B. Smith of Ukiah; also 
a three-year-old by Wayland W. 2:12%, sire of Boli- 
var 2:00%, belonging to some one over on the Coast, 
and the three-year-old Lord Dillon 39587, owned by 
the popular Santa Rosa vet, Dr. J. J. Summerfield. 
Lord Dillon is by Sidney Dillon, sire of Lou Dillon 
1:58%. out of Roblet 2:12, dam of Bonalet (3) 2:09%, 
Kate Dilon (3) 2:23% and Stanley Dillon 2:29% by 
Robin: second dam Ole 2:10%, etc., by Nutwood. 
This colt worked a mile in 2:28 as a two-year-old 
last year. Quinn is very enthusiastic over Sacra- 
mento track as a winter training track, and says it 
is just about the best one he ever trained horses 
over. 



The talk of the track at Pleasanton is the five- 
year-old gelding Admiral Togo, owned by the estate 
of James Coffin, and with some twenty-five brood- 
mares, colts and fillies being prepared for the sale 
at Chase & Co.'s on February 25th. Admiral Togo 
is by Iran Alto 2:12%, a horse that is making a 
name for himself as a sire of fast trotters that are 
game to the core. Admiral Togo was given a race 
record of 2:29% as a two-year-old, but not being 
staked was not started as a three-year-old. Last year 
in his four-year-old form he worked a mile in 2:15% 
early in the year, and Mr. Coffin gave word not to 
race him but keep him to start for the large purses 
this year as a five-year-old. The death of Mr. Coffin 
makes the sale of all his horses imperative, and. 
Admiral Togo will go under the hammer. He looks 
like the best 2:08 prospect in California and should 
be a good money winner for whoever gets him. 

The big State fair of Texas will be held at Dallas 
on October 19th to November 3d. This is the twenty- 
second annual renewal of the fair and race meeting. 
James Moroney is president and Sydney Smith secre- 
tary. 



Lewis G. Tewksbury, who, several years ago was 
much before the horse public as owner of the pacers 
John R. Gentry 2:00% and Robert J. 2:01%, has re- 
cently purchased a string of eleven animals, includ- 
ing the bay stallion Oom Paul, by Paul Kruger, dam 
Alaeta. Great things are expected of Oom Paul, as 
he has shown a number of miles around 2:10. 

o 

PILES CUBED IN 6 TO 14 EATS. 

PAZO OINTMENT is guaranteed 10 cure any case 
of Itching. Blind. Bleeding or Protruding Piles in 6 to 
14 days or money refunded. 50c. 



Saturday, January 26, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



By starting the California Circuit at Los Angeles 
the first week in July at least sixteen weeks of good 
racing can be had in California this year. 



Allen Farm has sold more than 500 horses at 
private sale in the past dozen years. 



THE PASADENA HORSE SHOW. 



The veteran driver Chas. Marvin has about made 
up his mind to retire and has consigned all of his 
horse stock to the Kentucky Sales Company's big 
sale next month. 



Brilliant Girl 2:08% and Totara 2:09% are now 
quartered in John (Directum) Kelly's stable up on 
the Speedway. They are to sent to Russia next 
month. 



George Wilkes 2:22 was raced twelve seasons, 
and in that time won twenty-eight races out of 
sixty starts. 



There is a green trotting mare by Bingen under 
cover in New England which worked in 2:11 last 
summer. 



Mr. A. S. Fox of Redlands, has received a mag- 
nificent set of harness which was awarded his pacer 
Roscoe for winning a race at a matinee of the San 
Bernardino Driving Club some time ago. 



Mr. C. J. Towson, one of the directors of the 
Pleasanton Driving Club, has just completed a very 
handsome driving bridle with overdraw, which he 
has offered as a prize for one of the races at the 
club's matinee to he held on February 22d at Pleas- 
anton track. It shows very fine workmanship and 
is a trophy that will be highly prized by the win- 
ner. 



The citizens of El Paso, Texas, will organize a 
fair and race association and build a mile track. 
It is proposed to hold an annual fair and race meet- 
ing at which the horses that race on Eastern tracks 
would stop for a week of racing while on their way 
to the Phoenix and Los Angeles fall meetings. 



The Pleasanton Driving Club will hold its matinee 
races postponed from January 19th, on Washing- 
ton's birthday, February 22d. Three or more races 
will be on the card, and twenty horses have already 
been entered from which the races will be made up, 
classifying them as closely as possible. The new 
officers of this enterprising club are Lee Wells, pres- 
ident; Thos. Ronan, vice-president; Dr. L. A. Cole- 
stock, secretary-treasurer, and F. P. Hellwig, C. A. 
Gale, N. Hansen, A. Goulart and C. J. Towson, di- 
rectors. 



The harness meeting to be given at Windsor next 
summer just preceding the opening of the big circuit 
meetings on this side of the line will be more of a 
Grand Circuit character than any that has preceded 
it in that good Canadian racing town. In addition 
to the usual number of regular purse events, two 
$5000 early closing events, one for trotters and one 
for pacers, will be opened in the near future, and 
it is certain that they will attract entries from about 
every stable of prominence. If Detroit opens the 
big ring races this season, as seems probable, the 
Windsor meeting will be the week preceding. If De- 
troit gives no meeting, then the Windsor dates will 
be chosen so that the meeting there will precede the 
first big meeting on this side of the line. 



Ed. Bither is jogging Mack Mack 2:08 at Boston. 



Charlie Eldridge will race Captain Derby 2: 06% 
again this year. 



F. S. Chickering of Worcester, Mass., claims that 
his mare Mons Grey 2:22% is the holder of the 
world's record for the largest number of races and 
winning heats in the same number of days. She 
won six races in 18 straight heats in 10 days, and 
captured four races in straight heais in five days. 



James K. Armling, a well known Central New 
York horseman, who died at his hoce in Bridgewater 
recently, requested just previous to his death that 
the hearse which carried his remains to the grave 
should be drawn by his team of fast pacers, Merry 
Chimes and Adine, ond hifc wishes were complied 
with and the horses which the dead horseman had 
guided in many exciting speed contests drew his 
body to its last resting place as decorously as the 
occasion demanded. Mr. Armling, when returning 
from the Albany races last October, occupied a room 
in a hotel in which a diptheria patient had been quar- 
antined and contracted the dread disease. After a 
long illness and a partial recovery, complications 
arose which resulted in his death. 



Pemberton, the three-year-old colt by Boydello 
2:14%, out of Lottie Parks 2:16%, that Mr. T. 
J. Crowley of this city has consigned to the Combina- 
tion Sale at Fred H. Chase's pavilion on the 11th 
of next month, is related to some pretty high horse 
society. His sire, Boydello 2:14%, is a son of Boy- 
dell, own brother to Del Mar, sire of Major Delmar 
1:59%. His dam, Lottie Parks 2:16%, is by Cupid 
2:18, own brother to Sidney Dillon, sire of Lou 
Dillon 1:58%, consequently Pemberton is related 
through his dam to the fastest trotter in the world 
and through his sire to tne second fastest. 



A very handsome sorrel gelding, eight years old, 
15% hands, a trotter, and broken to saddle, is of- 
fered for sale by Mr. W. S. Clark of Concord, Cal., at 
a reasonable price. See advertisement. 



Remember that on February 1st a payment of $10 
is due on each foal entered in Pacific Breeders' Fu- 
turity for foals of 1905, the two-year-old divisions 
of which stake are to be trotted and paced this year, 
and the three-year-old divisions next year. There is 
$7,000 in this stake, which makes it a thousand dol- 
lars more valuable than any of its predecessors. 



Lottie Parks 2:16% by Cupid 2:18, out of a mare 
by Bismark 2857, is to be sold at auction at the 
Combination Sale at Fred H. Chase's new pavilion, 
Monday evening, February 11th. She was a very fast 
mare and is a sure breeder. Three of her colts will 
be sold the same evening and all are good lookers 
and promising. They are by Boydello 2:14% and 
Monterey 2:09%. 



W. W. Mendenhall brought the great Zombro trot- 
ter, Charley T. 2:11%, and the McKinney colt, Sir 
John, back with him when he returned from his 
Eastern trip, and they are now at the home of 
their owner, Mr. John Treadwell of Piedmont, who 
is driving them on the roads. While East Mr. Men- 
denhall sold for Mr. Treadwell the pacer Edwin S. 
2:08 for $1,500, the gray gelding What It It 2:11 
by Direct for $1,000 and the trotter Iloilo 2:15 by 
Welcome for $1,000. These were all at private sale. 
Forest W. 2:14% by Wayland W. was sold at the 
Old Glory sale for $450. Edwin S. was purchased 
by a gentleman who lives on Long Island and was 
taken south by R. L. Davis, who is training a string 
of horses at Columbus, Georgia. Iloilo and What Is 
It are both being used on the speedways and roads 
around New York. 



Zolock 2:05%, the great race horse and great sire, 
will make the season of 1907 from February 1st to 
June 1st at Los Angeles, and from June 1st to Sep- 
tember 1st at Irvington track, Portland, Oregon. 
Zolock is having wonderful success in the stud, and 
has already sired Bystander 2:08, Delilah (4) 2:09%, 
Sherlock Holmes 2:11%, Ambush 2:14%, Zolahka 
(2) 2:23%, Iugarita 2:25% nad Dixie W. 2:27. Of 
these, Delilah, Ambush and Zolahka are stake win- 
ners. As Zolock is only twelve years old, and the 
first of his get to start were the two-year-olds, Am- 
bush, trotter, and Delilah, pacer, in 1904, when they 
took records of 2:20 and 2:16% respectively, Zo- 
lock's success as a sire is little short of wonderful. 



More than $1,500,000 was hung up in purses for 
harness races in the West last season, as will be 
seen by the following extract from the official report 
of Secretary W. H. Knight of the American Trotting 
Association. The American Trotting Association had 
674 members in 1906, located in thirty-nine States 
and Territories, Canada and British America. These 
members had 698 meetings during the year, with 
an aggregate of 2,230 days of trotting and pacing 
races, the first meeting commencing on May 6th, 
the last ending on December 1st. At these meetings 
$1,759,785 was offered in stakes and purses for trot- 
ting and pacing horses. The amount hung up by 
members of the National Association amounts to 
quite as much. 



The development theory has many friends and 
seemingly as many foes. On both sides lances are 
constantly set and thrusts are made whenever occa- 
sion offers. We desire to introduce the California 
bred mare theory: Lou Dillon 1:58%, the fastest 
trotting mare in the world, is a California bred mare 
from a California bred mare; Sweet Marie 2:02 the 
second fastest trotting mare in the world, and the 
champion race mare of the world is a California bred 
mare, whose dam was also bred in California. Now 
our theory is that to get the greatest speed in a 
female trotter one must own a California bred mare 
as a starter. Of course, the theory isn't worth a 
tinker's imprecation to any student of breeding 
who has a think tank, but until a mare bred in some 
other State producers a trotter than can beat the 
records of Sweet Marie and Lou Dillon it will be 
as good to argue about as the development theory 
is. 

o 

NEWS FROM DENVER. 



Denver, January 14. — J. Fred Roberts, first presi- 
dent of the Denver Gentlemen's Driving and Riding 
Club, was re-elected to that position at the annual 
meeting of the club members. Mr. Roberts held 
the position in 1898, 1899, 1900 and 1901, and at the 
end of his fourth term declined a re-election. He has 
always been one of the most active members, and has 
allowed few years to pass in which he was not 
among the leading winners of races. During the year 
just closed he started in nineteen races, of which he 
won eighteen. These were won principally with 
Martha B., Briney K. and Jim Duval. The trotter 
•Briney K. made a particularly good record, winning 
thirteen of fourteen races and competing in thirty- 
four heats. The only race he lost was to Jim Ferry 
2:09%, once a starter on the Grand Circuit. The 
officers elected by the club were: President, J. Fred 
Roberts; vice-president, E. F. Kaime; secretary- 
treasurer, J. K. Stuart; historian, J. M. Norman; 
other directors, J. A. Burnett, J. M. Herbert, M. J. 
Dunleavy, J. A. Osner, Albert Wright, C. H. Sker- 
ritt, F. C. Came. 



Your stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's Napa 
Soda. 



The rumor comes from Los Angeles that the 
Pasadena Horse Show may not be held in Tourna- 
ment Park next March, and that instead the Los 
Angeles and Pasadena Horse Show associations may 
combine and hold the double show in Los Angeles 
on March 7, 8, and 9, the dates set for the Pasadena 
show. 

When questioned concerning the matter the Pasa- 
dena officers decline to discuss the matter, although 
they admit that there is a hitch in the arrange- 
ments about the place of holding the show. As 
there is no other place in Pasadena to hold it, it is 
obvious that it will have to be in Los Angeles if 
Tournament Park is not available. 

Just as soon as it is definitely known where the 
show iaxto be held the literature will be printed and 
posters" and advertising gotten out. The Horse show 
is recognized as a great drawing card for Pasadena 
and should it be held elsewhere there will be keen 
regret felt by many. 

Three classes are to be added this year for the 
show in which there will be considerable interest. 
There is a class for California bred heavy harness 
horses, singles; a class for the same, pairs; and a 
class for California bred roadsters. 

The prize lists arc now in the hands of the printer 
and 2500 copies will be mailed next week to persons 
who are liable to be interested. The list shows a 
material increase in the prizes for certain classes. 
In the ladies' pairs, appointments, the prizes this 
year will be a $65 and $35 silver cup as against $50 
and $25 cups for the same class last year. The 
single victo.ria class is one that many women are 
interested in and for this the prizes will be the same 
as last year — $50 and $25 cups. In the ladies' saddle 
class the prizes will be $65 and $35 cups as against 
$50 and $25 last year. 

It is expected that there will be several additional 
entries this year, as at least two men with fine 
strings of horses who were not here last year will 
probably enter this year. One of these is Richard 
Carman, the well known whip of Long Island, who 
is noted for the dexterity with which he handles the 
ribbons over coach horses, and for his fine stables. 
Mr. Carman stopped at the Green earlier in the 
season and is now staying at Hotel Alexandria in 
Los Angeles. Mr. Carman brought a fine string of 
horses with him this winter and it is hoped by all 
who have the interests of the annual show at heart 
that he will decide to enter. 

Then Lamon V. Harkness of New York and 
Pasadena, whose fine entries were notable features 
of the first show of two years ago, intends to enter 
this year. The Harkness horses were missed from 
the track last year and there was the keenest regret 
felt. Benjamin Blossom, F. E. Wilcox, John S. 
Cravens, E. Groenendykc, will all probably enter 
horses and many others who entered last year. It 
is hoped that Albert C. Burrage, the copper king of 
Redlands and Boston, will see fit to bring down his 
horses this year as they made one of the most 
notable features of last year's show. 

The matter of judges has not yet been determined. 
Francis T. Underhill, the well known Madson Square 
Garden judge for the New York Horse Show, who 
judged last year's show, is at present in Paris on his 
wedding trip, and it is uncertain if he will be in 
this country at the time of the show. 

There were no Pasadena entries in the Los 
Angeles show last year and should the two shows 
have to be combined it will mean a good deal to 
the Los Angeles association. 

Officers and directors this year are: Fred E. Wil- 
cox, president; W. J. Hogan, vice-president, Louis- 
ville, Ky. ; John S. Cravens, vice-president; Thaddeus 
Lowes, Pasadena, vice-president; Robert Lee Bettner, 
vice-president, Riverside; John B, Miller, vice-presi- 
dent; Benjamin Blossom, vice-president, Pasadena; 
Edwin D. Neff, secretary and treasurer, Pasadena; 
A. Kingsley Macomber, Pasadena; D. M. Linnard, 
Pasadena; L. V. Harkness, Pasadena; Frank V. 
Rider, Pasadena; Col. John Lamoert, Pasadena; 
Thomas D. Wood, Santa Barbara; Graham E. Bab- 
cock, San Diego; E. D. Roberts, San Bernardino; 
E. C. Sterling, Redlands; Fred H. Bixby, Long 
Beach; Milo M. Potter, Los Angeles. — Pasadena 
News. 

o 

The following report in the New York Herald of 
an interview with R. W. Cable, an American trainer 
who for the past four years has been in charge of 
an important stable in Russia, may open the eyes 
of some of our trotting managers, as to the extent 
and importance of the sport in that country. Mr. 
Cable says: "I have seen 57,000 persons present at 
a trotting race there. It is the belief of some of the 
Yankee trainers now in Russia that so good are the 
Russian bred trotters, the produce in part of Ameri- 
can stallions, that the best in that country could 
come back to America and win. Betting is done main- 
ly through the pari-mutuel, though in the clubs some 
of the highest betting imaginable is going on during 
the races. The odds are established by a sort of 
auction pool system. Very few races at less than a 
mile are run in Russia. During the months of July 
and August the racing program calls for the distribu- 
tion of more than 1,500,000 rubles, or $765,000. I 
have seen racing there begin on an afternoon at 2 
o'clock and continue until 10 o'clock in the evening. 
The light is good up to the hour mentioned. The 
secretary of the jockey club there, Mr. Stolphe, 
speaks seven languages, and on the day the Suburban 
was run was able to tell me the name of the winner, 
having received the news by a special cablegram." 



6 



T HE B REEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday. January 26. 1907. 



California Circuit Assured! 



REPRESENTATIVES FROM MANY PLACES AT- 
TEND CONVENTION AT PLEASANTON, 
JANUARY 19th. 



Permanent Organization Effected — Circuit Dates 
Proposed— Delegates Banqueted by Pleasan- 
ton Driving Club. 

With the most representative attendance of dele- 
gates from fair associations, track managers and 
harness horse owners that has assembled in Cali- 
fornia for years, the convention called to take pre- 
liminary steps toward the organisation of a California 
Circuit, met at Odd Fellows Hall in Pleasanton at 
1:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon, January 19th. When 
the meeting was called to order there were just 62 
persons present, all there for the purpose emending 
their aid to the formation of a circuit of harness 
racing in California for the season of 1907. 

The California State Agricultural Society sent as 
delegates to this convention Directors P. H. Burke, 
E. W. Howard and William Pierce, all of whom were 
present. 

From Salinas came President J. B. Iverson of the 
Monterey Fair Association, and Messrs. Chas. White- 
head, W. Parsons and James Anderson, representing 
the horse owners and business men of Salinas. 

The Woodland Fair Association sent Director A. 
C. Stevens as its delegate, while Mr. M. C. Keefer 
was there to represent Mr. Brown, owner of the 
Woodland track, as well as the business men of the 
town. 

The San Benito Fair Association was represented 
by President Robt. I. Orr of Hollister. 

Pleasanton was represented by President C. L. 
Creilin of the Trotting Association that gave the 
last meeting at that place, by President Lee Wells 
and Secretary Colestock of the Pleasanton Driving 
Club and by a large number of the leading citizens 
of the town, including City Trustee Nevins, City 
Clerk Jos. Neal, and many others. 

The Kings County Fair Association sent as its dele- 
gate Director Jos. Biddle. 

Dixon, Solano county, where there is an excellent 
half mile track and many enthusiastic harness horse 
breeders who desire a meeting to be held there this 
year, sent Mr. E. D. Dudley as its representative. 

The Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Asso- 
ciation, whose meeting will be held at Santa Rosa 
this year, was represented by Director Frank H. 
Burke, as both President Heald and Secretary Kellev 
were unavoidably absent. 

Mr. Benj. Cram, formerly of Boston but now a 
resident of San Francisco, and one of the most ener- 
getic and enthusiastic advocates of a California 
circuit, was present on invitation and proved a valu- 
able addition to the convention. 

San Jose sent the great trainer, Budd Doble, and 
Mr. T. H. Barstow to assist in organizing a circuit 
even though San Jose could not be a member on ac- 
count of having no track. 

Letters and telegrams asking for a place on the 
circuit and stating that meetings would be given 
this year were received from the following: 

Robert Smith, secretary Los Angeles Harness Horse 
Association. 

Robert T. Curtis, secretary San Bernardino and 
Kiverside Association. 

Thos. Holmes, director San Bernardino Harness 
Horse Association. 

Ernest Aladi, secretary Santa Maria Race Track 
Association. 

Thos. Smith, president Vallejo Association 

H. Stover, Petalunia Race Track. 

W. T. Ingwerson, secretary San Joaquin Valley Cir- 
cuit comprising Fresno, Tulare, Hanford and Bakers- 
field. 

With this representation a circuit was assured even 
before the convention was called to order 

Organization was first effected by the election of 
Mr. Frank H. Burke as chairman and Dr. L. A Cole- 
stock as secretary of the convention. 

On motion the associations represented in person 
f, i ,y ,.i 3roxy were then chosen as the members of 
the California circuit with Mr. F. H. Burke as presi- 
dent and D. L. Hackett secretarv. 

An executive committee of three, consisting of 
President Burke, F. W. Kelley and Benj. Cram were 
then elected to arrange dates for the circuit, secure 
the endorsement of the different members and at- 
tend to all matters necessary to make the California 
Circuit a success. The convention then adjourned. 

The executive committee met at the office of the 
Breeder and Sportsman on Wednesday afternoon 
January 23d, and selected the following dates for a 
continuous circuit, which has been submitted to the 
different associations for their approval: 
San Bernardino we ek ending June 29 

c° S . J ? S week endi "& July 6 

Santa Maria week ending July 13 

halinas week en( j mg Ju]v 2u 

lollister week ending j u)y 27 

I leasanton wee k ending August 3 

bant* Rosa (P. C. T. H. B. A.) .week ending August 10 

Petaluma week ending August 17 

vallejo week ending August 24 

„. xon ,- ■•: week ending August 31 

\Voodland week ending September 7 

bacramento (State Fair) . .week ending September 14 

San Joaquin Valley Circuit, four meetings 

week ending October 12 

ban Bernardino week ending October 19 

Los Angeles week ending October 26 



This will give at least 14 and perhaps 18 weeks of 
continuous racing. 

The executive committee will impress upon the 
directors and managers of the above named associa- 
tions and tracks the necessity of announcing pro- 
grams early, and it is thought that by March 1st 
nearly all will have their programs ready for the 
perusal of horse owners and trainers. 

Many of the associations will announce two earlv 
closing stakes, one for trotters and one for pacers, to 
close during March, and the regular purses will be 
announced at the same time, but close later. 

There has not been for years as bright a prospect 
for a season of high class harness racing in Cali- 
fornia as exists now, and the convention which met 
at Pleasanton last Saturday has accomplished an 
excellent work, one which will meet the approbation 
of every lover of the harness horse in California. 

The Banquet. 

After the adjournment of the convention, President 
Lee Wells, on behalf of the Pleasanton Driving Club, 
invited all those present to the banquet room of Odd 
Fellows Hall to partake of refreshments, an invita- 
tion which was accepted unanimously and with 
avidity. On entering the dining hall a most beau- 
tiful sight greeted the eye. The walls were hung 
with beautiful pictures of all the trotting and pacing 
champions that had made California famous. Fes- 
toons of flags and draperies of many-colored ribbons 
were hung from the ceiling, and on the walls were 
arranged long links of horse boots, bits and bridles 
making a most beautiful effect. The tables were 
arranged in the shape of a horseshoe and were be- 
decked with flowers and ferns fresh from the gardens 
of Pleasanton's beautiful homes. 

The feast spread before the guests was a most 
lavish one. It was more like a Thanksgiving or 
Christmas dinner than a "banquet" as the term is 
used. Hot roast chicken and turkeys, hot green 
peas, string beans and other green vegetables, hot 
coffee and hot home-made mince pie. Of course the 
feast started off with the customary oysters on the 
half shell, followed by soups, salads, etc., and ended 
with "cafe noir." There was wine in moderation, 
made at the vineyards in the vicinity of Pleasanton 
and rated as fine as comes from the famous cellars 
of France. This elegant banquet was prepared under 
the immediate supervision of Mr. N. Hansen of the 
Hotel Pleasanton, who was voted a prince in his 
line. 

During the banquet many toasts were drank and 
responded to and that there are orators among the 
horsemen none can gainsay who attended this con- 
vention. Every speaker was enthusiastic over the 
outlook for a circuit and even the trainers and own- 
ers present who have horses that are being pointed 
for the Grand Circuit over East, said they would 
stay at home if there were classes, here for their 
horses. The best of fellowship obtained during the 
hour spent at the table and many good speeches 
were made and stories told. 

Before adjournment a vote of thanks was given 
the Pleasanton Driving Club and the citizens of the 
town for their great hospitality and cordial treat- 
ment of the visitors. Saturday, January 19th, was a 
red-letter day for California horsemen and will be 
long remembered as the day when the California Cir- 
cuit of 1907 was given a splendid start on the road 
to success. 



DEVELOPED DAMS. 



Advices from Kentucky indicate considerable in- 
quiry there for good campaigning material and the 
same is true of other localities that are famous 
for producing light harness campaigners. So long 
as this condition prevails there will be no falling 
off in prices for good ones. 



That eminent veterinary authority, Dr. A. S. Alex- 
ander of Wisconsin, says it is as necessary that the 
broodmares of a country or State should be sound 
as that the soundness of the breeding stallions should 
be made imperative. Indeed, we never can expect 
to have sound breeding stock while either side of 
the breeding equation is unsound. It takes like 
to produce like, as a general proposition, and when 
the mares are unsound the sound stallion will be un- 
able to offset the unsoundness. Some progress has 
been made in retiring unsound stallions in Wiscon- 
sin, and there can be little question that in time 
unsound stallions will be completely shut out, but 
thus far little has been accomplished in retiring 
the unsound mares. The presence of any disease 
mentioned as unfitting stallions for service should 
as certainly retire the mare. 



According to the "winter dope" the champion new 
trotter of 1907 is to be the highly tried stallion Vice 
Commodore, an elegantly bred horse and from all in- 
dications a very fast one. He is by the noted Bingen. 
out of Narion, whose sire was Arion 2:07%, cham- 
pion three-year-old trotting stallion, and his second 
dam is Nancy Hanks 2:04, the invincible. So that as 
far as breeding goes, Vice Commodore has a perfect 
right to be a champion trotter. He is owned by A. J. 
Welch of Hartford, and known to every Grand Circuit 
follower, and was in the stud last year, being given 
limited training, in which he showed halves at a 
2:05 clip. He is now matured, and as he showed 
much speed in his two and three-year-old form, and 
also through the fact that he will be named in all 
the big stakes, he will be the horse closely watched 
next season. 



Dr. Neal of the Western Horseman, who has evi- 
dently become tired of the shallow twaddle concern- 
ing dam development, recently hurled the following 
bomb into the camp of the development theory prat- 
tlers: 

"A 'developed dam' theorist 'points with pride' to 
the astonishing ( ! ) fact that he has been able to 
find that 'no fewer than fifty' of the trotters and 
pacers which were 'prominent performers' during 
the season of 1906 are out of 'fast record mares,' 
and adds inferentially that this wonderful showing 
should everlastingly decide the problem as to how 
to breed harness speed ! ! 'Mediocrity has been ex- 
cluded' and 'the speed-gauge has been set very high,' 
adds this profound writer. Ehm! Yes, 'mediocrity' 
has been excluded, and the 'speed-gauge' set high — 
just about as high as the theory itself is! Trotters 
with records of 2:14 to 2:17 and pacers with records 
of 2:12 to 2:14% are marvelously 'prominent per- 
formers' nowadays, and, 'without a struggle' should 
'win out' on any controverted point bearing on the 
deep subject of extreme speed breeding! 

"What a heartless and 'extinguishing' blow this 
argument is to the 'never-heard-the-ringing theory 
entrenched in fortresses of prejudice, perversity and 
antiquity!' Just think of the 'ponderosity' of the 
showing made by the writer quoted! Of the some- 
thing like two thousand trotters and pacers which 
were 'prominent performers' of 1906, some of them 
with records as low as 2:30 (!), the stupendous num- 
ber of fifty of them were out of 'fast record mares,' 
yet there are breeders who are so entrenched in the 
•fortresses of prejudice, perversity and antiquity' 
that they will yet use for speed breeding purposes 
such no-account, no standard record mares as Lou 
Milton, dam of Lou Dillon 1:58%; Expectation, dam 
of Major Delmar 1:59%; Lady Rivers, dam of Sweet 
Marie 2:02; Mabel, dam of Cresceus 2:02%; Zilica, 
dam of Dan Patch 1:55; Flaxey, dam of Audubon 
Boy 1:59%; Sweepstakes, dam of Star Pointer 
1:59%; Till, dam of Prince Alert 2:00 (bar 1:57%); 
Dame Wood, dam of John R. Gentry 2:00%; Topsey, 
dam of Dariel 2:00%; Luxora, dam of The Broncho 
2:00%; Belle W., dam of Bolivar 2:00%; Ethel wyn. 
dam of Ecstatic 2:01%, and Molly Hicks, dam of 
Gratt 2:02%, the fourteen fastest harness horses in 
the whole world! 

"O, ye god of 'prejudice, perversity and antiquity,' 
canst thou not allow reason (and personal experi- 
ence! !) to rule in plebeian men's pates to an ex- 
tent sufficient to keep them from fooling away their 
precious time breeding two-minute trotters and 
pacers from no-account, no-record mares when 
science says, and as master mind shows through a 
'scorching' tabulation, with 'mediocrity' eliminated, 
that 'fast record mares' will produce 'em what can 
go in 2:14 to 2:17! ! 'Prejudice, perversity and an- 
tiquity,' shame on you! You give the impertinent 
small breeder (who cannot buy a record mare) 
hopes of success; you increase breeding operations 
some thousand fold; you give stallion owners a 
show at getting back money spent in legitimate (and 
fake) advertising; you have given the world all of 
her champion trotters and pacers to date, but you 
are so lowly and plebeian, don cher know!" — Western 
Horseman. 

o 

A genuine horseman who has an inborn love for 
a good trotter or fast pacer can never be content to 
give up the horse and ride exclusively in an automo- 
bile. A good road horse is a remarkable health as 
well as pleasure promoter. The automobile doesn't 
bear that reputation, yet it is useful in its place. 
Its place evidently is not to displace the gentle- 
man's road horse. 



Note carefully the wear of the old shoe. It is the 
unimpeachable evidence of the manner in which the 
hoof has been set to the ground since the shoe was 
nailed to it, and give valuable "pointers" in level- 
ing the hoof. Wear is the effect of friction between 
the shoe and the ground at the moment of contact. 
Since the properly leveled hoof is set flat to the 
ground, the "grounding wear" of a shoe should be 
uniform at every point, though the toe will always 
show wear, due to scouring at the moment of "break- 
ing over." Everything which tends to lengthen the 
stride tends also to make the "grounding wear" more 
pronounced in the heels of the shoe, while all causes 
which shorten the stride, as stiffening of the limbs 
through age, overwork or disease, bring the "ground- 
ing wear" nearer the toe. An exception should be 
noted, however, in founder, in which the "grounding 
wear" is most pronounced at the heels. — John W. 
Adams. 



It requires ability to properly shoe and balance a 
horse as well as to develop speed in order that a 
man may become very successful as a trainer. Some 
who saw The Abbot 2:03% trot when he held the 
world's champion record believed him to be a natural 
trotter E. F. Geers says that The Abbot as a three- 
year-old "was rough gaited and inclined to mix and 
amble in his gaits. I experimented with him for 
some time before he convinced me that he possessed 
material sufficiently good to be eligible to start in 
the Grand Circuit. I finally shod him with eleven 
ounces in front and added three ounce toe weights 
with a square-toed shoe on the left front and right 
hind foot, also made the left hind shoe full at the toe 
and a trifle longer than the shoe on the other hind 
foot, and shod in this way he w-ould trot squarely 
after the preliminary amble." In the hands of a 
trainer less expert in balancing and gaiting a horse 
The Abbot would probably never have gained dis- 
tinction unless as a hoppled pacer. 



Saturday, January 26, 1907.] 



7 



WITH OR WITHOUT HOBBLES. 



Flora Directum, a Minnesota product, owned by 
C. J. Lord of Cando, N. D., looks to be a possible 
champion the coining season. Sired by the Inter- 
national Stock Pood Farm champion trotting stallion 
Directum 2:05%, and out of a mare owned by Hu- 
bert P. Marx, at Shakopee, Minn., this filly that 
paced to a record of 2:11% at Springfield last fall as 
a three-year-old without apparent exertion, is "Oil in 
the can" to the observer, and her smooth, fraction- 
less gait contains possibilities which makes any- 
thing in the way of record breaking seem possible for 
her. But it was not always thus. Henry Ten Eyck 
White in the Chicago Tribune tells of the tribula- 
tions of her trainer, Charley Dean, as follows: 

It has been accepted as gospel, so far as pacing 
horses are concerned, that "once a hobbler always 
a hobbler," and yet an exception to the rule has been 
discovered under unusual circumstances. Curiously 
enough the nag whose case has fractured all the 
rules is one of the top-notch young pacers of the 
season. 

The pacer whose case has set the jocks to thinking 
is Flora Directum, how three years old. Flora was 
bred up in the chilly end of Minnesota, and when 
only a yearling was sent to Charles Dean to see what 
could be done in the way of making speed with her, 
as she was well enough bred to spend money on, be- 
ing by a one-time champion trotting stallion out of 
a mare of pedigree. The idea was that Flora ought 
to make a trotter, but she soon showed there was 
no trot in her make-up. She had, in fact, not much 
of any gait except a fine walk, but there were mo- 
ments when she shifted into something remotely re- 
sembling a pace with a dash of single-foot thrown 
in, and a hop now and then. 

After exhausting all the known artifices for making 
a horse go fast, Dean came to the conclusion that 
perhaps a pair of hobbles would help Flora. So he 
put them on the spring she was a two-year-old, 1905, 
and by taking up the straps real tight Flora struck 
a pace. She was trained with the speed garters all 
summer and fall to such good purpose that just be- 
fore frost time she paced a mile in 2:23%. This was 
a heap better than nothing, and last spring Dean re- 
newed operations with the idea that maybe he could 
have a 2:20 pacer this fall. He got the goods 
by the middle of the summer, but in the meantime 
things had happened. He was notified that the filly 
positively must be raced at the big Hamline (Minn.) 
fair, and that hobbles were barred there. 

Dean smiled sadly when he read that letter, be- 
cause without the restraining ribbons for her legs 
Flora was real helpless. But he began working her 
at the new style of hitch and found that at a slow 
pace she was all right. Also that when a fast work- 
out was wanted the hobbles must be hung on with all 
the old-time care. However, he kept at the good 
work, and every week Flora, would go a little faster 
without the limb steerers. Finally, just before it 
was time to ship to Hamline, where she was engaged 
in a three-year-old pacing stake, she stepped a mile 
in 2:19%. This did not look like a winning gait 
to Dean, who knows how the "bush" horses tear off 
their miles, but he took Flora along. 

Perhaps the ride on the cars helped her, but at any 
rate when the filly was turned around in her Hamline 
race she struck out at a clip that had the other 
starters dizzy in no time. After pacing to the half- 
mile pole in 1:05, leaving the others far in the rear, 
she was pulled up, and simplv strolled home in 
2: 15y 4 . 

Then Flora was headed for the Illinois State Fair 
at Springfield. When the starter said "go" Dean 
looked for another 2:15 mile, but that would not 
satisfy Flora. She did the trick in 2:11% and never 
breathed hard. 

Then Dean remembered that the filly was engaged 
in the pacing Futurity at Lexington, Ky., and on look- 
ing at his book the night of the Springfield race, 
which was on Monday, he found that the Lexington 
event was billed for the following Thursday. So he 
put Flora on the cars and started south. She reached 
Lexington Wednesday night, and the next day came 
out fresh as a lark and made Brenda Yorke, holder 
of the world's record for three-year-old pacers, go 
within a puarter of a second of that mark over a 
track that certainly was not fast. In other words, 
Flora was right at the other filly's neck in 2:09. 

Right now Flora Directum looks like about the 
best thing in sight among the young pacers. Why 
she suddenly concluded that the hobbles were not 
necessary in her case cannot be told but, that is 
exactly what happened, and it is the one and only 
case on record among colt pacers, or, for that mat- 
ter, horses of any age that really needed the hobbles 
because they could not pace without them. Plenty 
of hobble wearing pacers are thus rigged because 
without the straps they will pull their drivers cock- 
eyed, but where a horse gets them put on because it 
simply can't pace without them there is not supposed 
to be any cure for the ailment. But Flora Directum 
furnished one exception, and perhaps sonr? day there 
will be another. 

o 

REDLAC 2:07i/ 2 AT LOS ANGELES. 



Mr. C. J. Grubb writes us that his stallion Redlac 
2:07% by Allerton 2:09%, dam by Muscovite, son of 
Nutwood, is now at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, 
and will make the season of 1907 there. Redlac is 
by record the fastest trotting stallion now in Cali- 
fornia, and as he is a son of the great Allerton he 
should be a very popular sire with our breeders. An 
advertisement with full description and terms will 
appear in the Breeder and Sportsman next week. 



CHEMISTRY OF BREEDING TROTTERS. 



Dr. McCoy in the Horse Review gives some in- 
teresting matter relative to this subject. He says- 
The horse's food must contain in a soluble form 
every single element that is needed for growth, repair 
of used-up tissue and the production of heat and 
energy. 

The food of the horse is grass and grain. Crass 
and grain grow about everywhere the horse is bred; 
or you can purchase them in the dry state and have 
them given to your horse. So, you can say, feeding 
the horse is a simple matter. Not so, however. The 
grass you feed, the grain you sow or buy, will con- 
tain only those elements that composed the ground 
on which they grew. 

It is true that grass and grains alike take some 
properties from the air, but these are the gases, car- 
bonic acid and nitrogen. The horse himself takes 
the oxygen he uses from the air. All the other ele- 
ments that the horse requires he must get out of 
the ground, and ground differs as much as do the 
climates of different sections. In one locality the 
land will be rich in lime and poor in potash, in 
another it will be rich in every necessary element 
excepting phosphorus, and so on through a long 
scale of variations. 

Chloride of sodium, a substance containing two 
essential elements of the horse's body, sodium and 
chlorine, is but little contained in any food stuff, 
so to have it in the horse's body it must be given 
to him separately. 

Common salt plays three great functions in the 
horse's body. 

First. — It furnishes him gastric juice with ils 
needed acid. 

Second. — It furnishes him soda for his bile and 
blood. 

Third. — It assists in the passage of the digested 
foods into the lymph vessels and into the blood ves- 
sels. It assists in the passage of the food elements 
from the blood vessels into the tissues. 

Many of my readers no doubt have noticed that on 
a given farm the horses would thrive on one field, 
while on another they would not do nearly so well. 
In such cases the pasture of the field that did not 
give good results would appear just as abundant 
as that in the field on which the horses did so well. 
The cause of this variation on the same farm is 
due to the fact that one field lacked some necessary 
element which the other field possessed. As the soil 
is, so are the plants grown on it. A complete soil 
furnishes complete provender, an incomplete soil 
furnishes incomplete provender. 

I wish also to say something as to the acidity of 
grass as applied to hay making. At night grass is 
full of acid, on cloudy days it is acid, in the morn- 
ing and evening it is neutral in reaction. At mid- 
day, with the sun pouring down its life-giving rays, 
all grass is strongly alkaline. This is the time to 
cut hay — from 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. Cut your hay on 
sunshiny days and toward mid-day; then cure it in 
the cock to avoid acid fermentation in the barn 
and you will have an article worth, as a feed, double 
the ordinary hay of commerce. 

o 

DYING IN HARNESS. 



Only a fallen horse, stretched out there on the road, — 
Stretched in the broken shafts, and crushed by the 
heavy load. 

Only a fallen horse, and a circle of wondering eyes 
Watching the cruel teamster goading the beast to 
rise. 

Hold, for his toil is over, — no jnore labor for him, 
See the poor neck outstretched and the patient eyes 
grow dim. 

See, on the friendly stones how peacefully rests his 
head, 

Thinking, If dumb beasts think, how good it is to be 
dead. 

After the burdened journey, how restful it is to lie 
With the broken shafts and the cruel load, — waiting 
only to die. 

Watchers, he died in harness, died in the shafts and 
straps, 

Fell, and the great load killed him; one of the day's 
mishaps. 

One of the passing wonders marking the city road, — 
A toiler dying in harness, heedless of call or goad. 

—John Boyle O'Reilley. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



F. G. Varner, St. Helena— The trotter Aral) and 
the three-year-old pacing filly Gold Leaf competed 
in a special purse for $1000 at Napa, California, Oc- 
tober 6th, 1888. Cold Leaf won the first heat in 
2:15%, and Arab the next three in 2:18, 2:20V4 and 
2:20. 



R. T. G., City — Sonoma Girl, the mare that trotted 
a mile in 2:07 at Los Angeles on Christmas Day, is 
by Lynwood W. 2:20 by Guy Wilkes. The dam of 
Sonoma Girl is Maud Fowler 2:21%, dam of Dumonl 
S. 2:20, Sonoma Queen 2:25, and Sonoma Maid 
2:29%, by Anteeo 2:16%; second dam Eveline, dam 
of five in the list, by Nutwood 600. 



The San Jose Rancho Driving Club of Lordsburg. 
New Mexico, has elected the following officers: 
President, James Dorr; vice-president, John Saxton; 
secretary, J. Soto; treasurer, P. J. Yorba; board of 
directors, J. D. Palomares, Clark Davis, Oscar 
Kelser. 



DATE OF FOALING IS IMPORTANT. 

"As the age of a colt counts from the first day 
of the year in which it is foaled, the earlier the 
youngster makes his appearance the older it will be 
at the beginning of its second year, and a few months' 
advantage may make a great deal of difference in 
the size and speed of the two-year-old trotter or 
pacer as the case may be," said Colonel Henry Ex- 
all, the well known trotting horse breeder and pro- 
prietor of Lomo Alto Farm, Dallas, Texas. "The 
early colts have quite an advantage in getting a 
good start before the hot weather and flies come to 
worry and set them back. I believe that it is fair 
to say that two April colts are worth as much as 
three that come in July or later. 

"To produce good, strong colts, mares should have 
plenty of nourishing food and a warm place for pro- 
tection against storms, but should be kept where they 
can get fresh air and exercise. They should not 
be allowed to get excessively fat, but should be in 
real good, smooth condition. If the mare is to have 
her colt during the early spring months, a large 
box stall free from any troughs, boxes, etc., should 
be provided and the mare kept In it in bad weather. 
The mares should be made accustomed to their stall 
by being kept in it part of the time, and as the time 
approaches for her foal, if the weather is cold or 
damp and threatening, she should be kepi in this 
stall and watched by an attendant who is intelli- 
gent enough to assist her if everything does not 
go just right at the- critical time, but if it becomes 
necessary to keep the mare up for any length of 
time, she should be hitched and driven two or three 
miles or be led by the side of a gentle pony every 
day, as it is absolutely necessary that she should 
have plenty of epercise. For a month or two v before 
the mare is due to foal if there is no green grass for 
her to run upon she should be fed largely upon 
wheat bran as a grain ration so that her bowels will 
be kept in good condition. 

"After the foal appears the attendant should put 
a small amount of iodoform or some other disinfect- 
ant on Us navel, as many colts die from joint evil or 
lock-jaw occasioned by parasites supposed to enter 
the colt's navel shortly after birth. It is also neces- 
sary during the first days of a colt's life to give it 
an enema of warm water with a little glycerine in 
it; do this whether you think it necessary or not. 
The majority of colts that are lost die during the 
first week from inflammation of the bowels caused 
by constipation. As the colt will not be able to take 
a full ration of milk at first, the mare's feed should 
be very light for the first week or ten days of the 
colt's life. She should not be allowed to drink all 
the water she wants at first, but be watered fre- 
quently so that she gets all the water she needs with- 
out gorging herself at any one time. A very slight 
change in the mare's treatment sometimes causes a 
very serious condition of the colt's bowels. The 
kind attendant in charge (and no rough one should 
be allowed) should handle the young foal all over 
and get its confidence and practically remove its 
fear of man during the first four or five days of 
its life. These lessons properly given will never 
be forgotten and will greatly simplify the education 
of the prospective horse. 

"After the colt is ten days or two weeks old, if in 
healthy condition, the food of the mare should be 
gradually increased so that she will be in full milk 
about the time the colt is able to take all that she 
will give. 

"The youngster will at that time probably weigh 
from 110 to 140 pounds and will increase in weight 
at a wonderful rate for a month or six weeks, by 
which time it will probably weigh twice as much as 
it did when it was foaled, but by getting no more 
milk than it did at first. Provision should be made 
for extra food if you desire the best growth and de- 
velopment of the youngster. The plan we adopt with 
good results is to make a pen some twenty or twenty- 
five feet square somewhere in the pasture, putting 
rails 2x6 so low that the mares can not get it, but 
the colts can; put in the center a low trough, in 
which keep bran and crushed oats so the little fel- 
lows can get a lunch at any time they desire. They 
will soon learn to eat a pound or two of grain each 
day, and the growth they will make on this ration 
and the mothers' milk will astonish any one who 
h!ls never tried to grow then in this way. 

"Another great advantage in this method is that 
by weaning time, say six months of age, the colts 
have become practically independent of their 
mothers, as they are already prepared to eat and 
digest a full ration of grain. This feeding place for 
the little fellows should be covered to protect them 
from the sun. In fact, I believe unless there is an 
abundance of shade in the pasture in this hot cli- 
mate, the mares and young colts should be shaded 
from 9 o'clock in the morning till 5 o'clock in the 
evening and allowed to run in the pasture during the 
night instead of the day, as the extreme heat of the 
sun seems to sap their vitality and prevent their 
growth. 

"Broodmares should be fed whenever they need 
it. It may be just as necessary in June or July as 
in December or January. Watch them and do not 
see how little they can live upon, but rather how 
much they can digest and assimilate without becom- 
ing excessively fat. There should be at all times 
in all pastures where the mares and colts are kept 
either a long trough or a number of boxes containing 
a mixture of charcoal, salt and ashes that they can 
lick at will." 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 26, 1907. 



INDIGESTION AND IMPACTION. 

When a horse suffers from acute indigestion the 
trouble may exist either in his stomach or intes- 
tines, and it requires considerable experience ' to 
decide which organs are involved and "how badly 
the animal is affected. Where it becomes distended 
with gas, and as the horse cannot vomit, there is 
great danger of rupture of the stomach, which* is 
a small organ with a capacity of but three and a 
half gallons, or thereabouts. As gas is present it is 
evident that no medicine should be given that will 
add to the distress, yet the owner often aggravates 
the condition fearfully and, indeed, frequently causes 
actual rupture of the stomach by administering cop- 
ious drenches containing baking soda, milk and 
vinegar. As the contents of the stomach are ex- 
tremely acid, the moment the soda solution enters 
the organ effervescence takes place and gas is gen- 
erated in great quantities. The soda given in this 
way acts about like seidlitz powders would were one 
to dissolve the two powders in separate tumblers 
of water and drink one solution after the other. 
The mixing of th<D two in the stomach would instant- 
ly cause tremendous evolution of gas. Such evolu- 
tion taking place in the stomach of the horse may 
cause rupture of that organ, and many a valuable 
horse has been killed in this way. 

When a horse suffers with bloating of the stom- 
ach from acute indigestion he stands up, shows 
slight pains, sweats here and there over the body, 
has a small, weak pulse, anxious countenance, and 
looks back at his side, paws, gags as if attempting 
to vomit and fluid may be heard to gush back and 
forth from stomach to mouth or nose. If the fluid 
comes from the mouth and nose it is most likely 
that rupture of the stomach has taken place and the 
horse then is, of course, beyond help. 

When the acute indigestion involves the intes- 
tines the body is distended (bloated), the most prom- 
inent part being high up in the right flank. In such 
cases, which are far less dangerous than bloating 
of the stomach, there rarely is regurgitation of food 
and fluid from the stomach, the horse lies down 
now and then but does not roll and kick viciously, 
evidently being afraid to do so, pants, has quick, 
feeble pulse, sweats, shows redness of the mem- 
branes of the eyes, passes little manure, or large 
masses of soft, mash-like, bad smelling, light-colored 
manure, or usually in hot weather, scours and has 
an increase in temperature. The bloating and diffi- 
culty in breathing are the principal symptoms and 
suffocation threatens if the gas is not released from 
the intestine (large colon). 

In impaction the horse may or may not be bloated 
in the flank, has more or less continuous pain which 
leads to rolling, kicking, pawing, straining, sitting 
on the rump, walking around the box or one or 
more of these symptoms is more or less prominent 
and towards the end of the attack, if it is to prove 
fatal, there is persistent walking around (the "grand 
march," as veterinarians sometimes call it, and in- 
dicative of enteritis), and now and then an attempt 
to lie down, with fear to do so, evidenced by crouch- 
ing and bending of the knees and hocks. The fail- 
ure to pass manure, the motionless state of the 
bowels, the absence of sounds on applying the ear 
to the horse's flank, and the persistent pain and 
pawing indicate impaction, and the attack may con- 
tinue for days without causing death. We have 
known one instance in which no movement took 
place until the eleventh day and during all of this 
time the horse suffered more or less pain and show- 
ed evident symptoms of the disease, such as anxiety 
restlessness, pawing and straining. 

In a case of acute indigestion affecting the stom- 
ach a qualified veterinarian should be called in just 
as soon as possible, as he may be able to relieve the 
distension of the stomach by passing a rubber tube 
down to that organ, and then by the hypodermic use 
of certan medicines which should not be used by 
anyone not thoroughly familiar with their actions 
Meanwhile it is safe and helpful to give preliminary 
home assistance to the suffering animal. This may 
consist in administering a copious rectal injection 
of soapy warm water by means of a hose and funnel 
or large syringe carefully used. No large drench 
of medicine should be given by mouth, but it will 
be safe and advisable to administer two ounces fo 
hyposulphite of soda, half an ounce of essence of 
peppermint, two drams of essence of Jamaica gigger 
and a dram of fluid extract of nux vomica in six 
ounces of warm flaxseed tea or water. A diffusable 
stimulant, such as sulphuric ether, also is commonly 
given and some veterinarians believe in administer- 
ing fluid extract of belladonna, chloral hydrate or 
cannabis indica to relieve pain. The use of such 
drugs is somewhat dangerous in these cases, and it 
should be left to the veterinarian to decide what 
should be given. 

Where there is dissension of the colon upon the 
right side injections by way of the rectum may safely 
be given, but the horse in neither of these bloated 
conditions should be galloped or run about as is 
the common practice of the horseman. If suffocation 
threatens, the trocar and canula should be inserted 
hign up in the flank at most distended part of right 
side, for evacuation of the gas, but the instrument 
should only be used by the practitioner who, thor- 
oughly familiar from training and experience, knows 
exactly how and when to use the instrument, where 
to insert it and how to prevent complications such 
as abscess or peritonitis which may follow the im- 
properly performed operation. It is a very different 
matter from "tapping" a cow for bloat. That oper- 
ation may safely be done by any intelligent man 



who is careful to keep instruments clean, but we 
cannot advise the tapping of horses by anyone not 
properly instructed and possessed of the necessary 
skill and experience. 

As to medicine, it is safe and beneficial in flatu- 
lent colic to give by way of the mouth two ounces 
of turpentine, a dram of fluid extract of nux vomica 
and a pint to a pint and a half of raw linseed oil. 
and to add, if pain is distressing, half an ounce of 
fluid extract of cannabis indica. Laudanum is best 
left out of a colic drench by anyone other than the 
graduate veterinarian, and on no account should 
an aloes physic ball be given in preference to raw 
linseed oil. As a general rule the medicine should 
be repeated in half quantity every two or three 
hours until relief is had. No medicine should ever 
be given to a horse by way of the nostril. 

Impaction of the bowels is best treated by re- 
peated doses of raw linseed oil, injections of warm 
water and glycerine, small doses of cannabis indica 
to relieve pain, and correct doses of nux vomica to 
stimulate peristaltic action of the bowels. The 
qualified veterinarian also will use by means of 
the hypodermic syringe medicines which are es- 
pecially effective in this disease, but which should 
not be handled by the amateur. — Wisconsin Agri- 
culturist. 

o 

GET A SADDLE HORSE. 



Someone has said, "The best thing for the inside of 
a man is the outside of a horse; and the best age to 
learn is between six and sixty— this applies to both 
sexes. Horseback riding is the noblest form of 
exercise, nearly ideal. No other compares with it 
for rounding the flabby flesh into firm and supple 
muscle, full of vim and vitality. 

"Spend an hour or two daily in the saddle and the 
brain clears, the skin glows with health and the 
nerves are steadied. Are you irritable, restless, sub- 
ject to insomnia, blue, forboding? Are you a 
mopor; does life seem not worth the living; do you 
begin to feel the need of stimulants.; do you snarl 
at your wife or nag your husband? Then medicine 
will not cure you. Mount a horse — keep it up for a 
week — and all is miraculously changed. When over- 
worked, tired, worn-out — do not 'lie around' or loll 
in a chair to get rested; exercise! Ventilate the 
lungs and burn up the wasted matter clogging your 
system. Feeling old simply means the body is rust- 
ing from disuse. 

"Horseback riding keeps the body, the figure and 
the heart young, teaches self-control, develops the 
will power, strengthens the heart and all the organs, 
promotes elimination, improves the appetite, in- 
vigorates digestion; the greenapple complexion gives 
way to blooming cheeks, poise and grace of carriage 
develop and a new zest in life is felt. Are you 
thirty-five and wish to appear twenty? Then ride 
horse-back. Don't say 'can't — it means 'won't' " 

Sounds like a patent medicine advertisement, 
doesn't it? It's nothing so complicated Only a 
straight-from-the-shoulder talk from a famous East- 
ern physician on the practical value of horse-back 
riding. Here is where the perfectly mannered 
animal, Mr. Railey tells about in this issue, is above 
all the motor cars ever invented. For the horse 
gives you courage, inspires sane, sweet ideas, rests 
you from the daily grind; rids you for the time from 
the strenuous press of the world on your heels. And 
the motor car brings on "nerves" and spinal com- 
plications and the breath of Nature is lost in the 
odor of the gasoline tank, and there is no peace in 
you. 

People are realizing this. The demand for the 
raddle horse increases each season. It is one of 
the gracious ways of spending money — for it gives 
pleasure in possession and whets animation toward 
life. It takes out the drawn lines in the face of the 
mentally overdone man, r.nd the peevish dissatisfied, 
restless wrinkles in the satiated woman. You re- 
gain your lost self-respect — and who don't lose theirs 
occasionally — drink in fresh ozone, get an inspiration 
for better living. That's what riding a good saddle 
horse will do. 

Hear what J. G. Paterson, of Dayton, Ohio, says 
about the benefit of saddle horse riding: 

"The American business man needs his holiday 
every year," he said. "We have to work at high 
pressure and unless we take care of ourselves, there 
is bound to be a breakdown. But the average 
American man of business usually makes a mistake 
of his holiday. He rushes off to Europe at express 
speed and when he arrives, rushes all over the place 
sight seeing. He is more tired out than ever when 
he boards the steamer for home. When he isn't in 
an express train, he is whirling over the country 
in an automobile, seeing nothing except at stopping 
places. I know. I have tried automobiles and 
everything else. Now I must recommend horseback 
touring as the greatest anu most enjoyable rest cure 
on earth. Some years ago, my health gave way from 
overwork, and my physician ordered horseback rid- 
ing. I came to the soutn of Lnglaud and with my 
secretary, toured the picturesque highways and by- 
ways of Devonshire and Cornwall to sand's End. — 
Hit and Spur. 

o 

W. H. Lumsden of Santa Rosa has his mare by 
Altamont out of Eveline, the dam of Ole 2 : 10 Roblet 
2:12, and several others in the list, broken to saddle 
and can be seen almost any day riding her on the 
streets of Santa Rosa. She is as they say in the 
hunting classes "up to about 200 pounds," as she 
carries Mr. Lumsden with ease. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. It means health. 



JOHN SPLAN'S VIEWS. 

Recently, in New York, John Splan talked like 
this to a bunch of horsemen, according to an ex- 
change: 

"Never breed a mare to a stallion that is not a 
natural trotter. I wouldn't breed a mare to the best 
bred stallion on earth if he was rough-gaited, or had 
to-be drilled into a gait before he went fast. A stal- 
lion of breeding with natural 2:30 speed will prove a 
better sire than one with a record of better than 2:10 
that had to be 'made.' 

"Breed only for what you want to produce. If you 
want pacers breed for pacers, but if you are after 
trotters keep as far away from that sidewheeler 
bunch of animals as is possible. When the Walnut 
Hall Farm was first started I asked Mr. Harkness if 
he would make a motto for the establishment and 
always heed it. He said that he would. It was 
'Never have a colt on the farm trained to pace, and 
if one should come along that will only pace, then 
not to train it at all.' 

"The result is that Moko, the country's most won- 
derful sire of Futurity winners, and the premier stal- 
lion at Walnut Hall, has had only three pacers, all 
developed away from the farm. The fastest of the 
three, had it been raised at the farm I firmly believe, 
would have to-day a faster record on the trot than 
it has pacing. At Walnut Hall the whole 'bug' is in 
getting trotters. The result is that all are striving 
for one purpose, and the breeding, training, etc., ex- 
pended has resulted in the fame of the establish- 
ment going all over the world. 

"It is far better to breed and develop one trotter 
than twenty-five pacers. What is a pacer, anyway? 
Only a sporting tool at the best. It can never become 
a gentleman's horse. The pacer is doing more to 
harm the breeding interests in this country than 
any one thing. In time to come those countries 
like Austria, France, Italy, Russia, etc., will have 
us back numbers in the breeding of the trotter, as 
over there their whole mind is on producing the trot- 
ter, and the pacer is entirely ignored. 

"Did I think Wedgewood 2:19 would prove a good 
sire? No, sir. Mr. Conklin thought a great deal of 
the stallion, and he had almost planned to buy a 
stock farm and put him on it and raise a band of 
young Wedgewoods. I had to talk quite a little to 
have him shift his mind. I plainly told him that 
Wedgewood was far too hard gaited a stallion to 
ever be a success in the stud. 

"My opinion prevailed and the stallion was sold to 
stand at the Bates Farm in Watertown, Mass. He 
got a host of mares, as he had been such a race 
horse, but it has been just as I had said, he was a 
failure in the stud. 

"Do you know who will be the coming race driv- 
ers?" continued Mr. Splan. "Well, I'll tell you. It 
will be the young men who insist in not training or 
driving a hoppled pacer. 

"In the past few years I have seen more natural 
reinsmen go to the bad just through driving hoppled 
pacers than you can imagine. I know of one particu- 
lar instance. The young man hailed from Cleveland. 
Frequently have I admired his seat in the sulky and 
nice light-handed way that he could steady a trotter, 
and exclaimed to those in hearing that there was a 
driver by nature. 

"What has been the result? He later got to reef- 
ing hoppled pacers and his skill of touch in driving 
a trotter has entirely departed. To-day he is just an 
ordinary hoppled pacer mechanic. 

"There is a case of the same sort right in New 
England. When the young man struck the Grand 
Circuit at Empire City track he could rate and carry 
a trotter along on his stride with the best in the pro- 
fession. He, too, had a great future. Then he got a 
hoppled pacer. In the past couple of seasons the 
most of his campaigners have been hoppled pacers. 

"Why, the two I have mentioned are the last ones 
in the country I would give a good trotter to right 
now. They couldn't drive one. They have entirely 
lost the art of steadying a trotter from wire to wire, 
Send them a good trotter and in a few weeks the 
horse will be of no use. Two or three in the past 
season did not last them very long. 

"It is too bad. Hoppled pacers caused the whole 
thing. What a shame the National Trotting Associa- 
tion does not pass a rule barring the use of hopples 
on all green horses. It would do more to save the 
breeding interests of the country, besides giving us 
in the future some expert professional drivers, and 
not all of the hoppled pacer kind." 

o 

Too bad the weather prevented the matinee racing 
which the Pleasanton Driving Club had arranged for 
the entertainment of the visiting horsemen and dele- 
gates to the convention last Saturday. There would 
have been some hot contests. 



John A. McKerron's horse-boots and harness are 
the ones ordered by those who want the best. His 
place of business and factory on Hyde street is a 
busy place these days. 



We regret to learn that the veteran horseman 
Mart Rollins of Santa Rosa, owner of the great trot- 
ter of 1906, Charley Belden 2:08%, is in very poor 
health and confined to his home. He has been laid 
up for about a month, but there are hopes that with 
the advent of sunshine and good weather, which 
California has not had much of this year, so far, he 
will be out again and regain his health. No man in 
the horse business has more warm friends than Mr. 
Rollins. 



Saturday, January 26, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



. ❖*4>+4' > v » ! < > t< > t > > t > » t « » t « - fr » ! ■ ' t ' ' t < * ' t « ■ > M»*M^M~i"i**l"i* » t < » t < -t< » t « »!< >i« »fr ' I ' »t « ' t 1 ' 1' > t < ' trl ' ' I ' ' I' <t-M«J"M" 

! ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

I Conducted by J. X. DeWitt 



AAA A A A iTi A A A A A A A A A A A A -♦- A -♦ • A A A A -♦- A -»- -»- -♦- A A A. A i 

FISH AND GAME PROTECTION. 



(By Dr. A. M. Barker.) 

A situation now confronts the welfare of fish and 
game preservation, propagation and conservation in 
California, more serious than at any previous period 
in its history. In order that we may present the 
situation in its real and precarious aspect, it will be 
necessary to briefly review the past history of game 
and fish protection in this State since March, 1872. 

The Legislature passed an act creating the Califor- 
nia State Fish Commission, whose duty it is to look 
after the preservation and propagation of fish and 
game, and the enforcement of fish and game laws, 
etc. The Commission was launched with a small 
appropriation, little or no knowledge of how or what 
to do, with little or no interest taken by the people 
of the State in game or fish laws, which had for 
their object better protection of the same. Califor- 
nia in those days was a veritable paradise for sports- 
men. They could hardly realize that there could 
ever be an end to the bountiful supply which was 
theirs to enjoy. Years passed on; from time to 
time game and fish laws were passed, but their en- 
forcement was never taken seriously until a few 
years back the sportsmen began to realize that our 
fish and game were fast disappearing, that a valuable 
asset was slipping from our heritage; that unless 
prompt measures were taken that the incentive 
which takes thousands of citzens into the mountains 
to follow fleet-footed deer, or to whip the streams 
for trout, or to our uplands to pursue the king of 
all game birds — the valley quail — for food, pleasure 
and the greatest of all — needed recreation and health 
giving exercise — would soon be a thing of the past. 

They began to realize that a commission consist- 
ing of three men, with a small appropriation and a 
few deputies, could never stay the tide which was 
swiftly and surely depleting our fish and game. They 
realized that no Fish Commission, no matter how 
zealous, could, unaided by the people, enforce our 
fish and game laws. They realized that it was 
necessary to educate the people to the importance of 
respecting our game laws. 

Accordingly a ca.» was made to the sportsmen and 
all citizens interested in the cause of game and fish 
protection to meet in San Francisco for the purpose 
of organizing an association, the object of which 
would be to assist the State Fish Commission in the 
enforcement of our game laws, and to undertake to 
educate and interest the people in game and fish 
legislation. 

The meeting resulted in the organization on May 
26, 1900, of the California Game and Fish Protective 
Association The people there assembled recognized 
in H. T. Payne a man of wide knowledge of things 
pertaining to fish and game, their habits, haunts, 
needs, etc. He had followed the instincts of the 
sportsmen and anglers for years, had seen a veritable 
mecca for the sportsmen gradually and certainly 
fade until that memorable day in May, 1906, when 
his voice was raised in the first bona fide and busi- 
ness effort made by the sportsmen of California to 
join hands and hearts with the California Fish Com- 
mission in the laudable work of properly and effect- 
ively caring for and maintaining our fish and game 
supply. His was the voice which pointed out our 
impending peril! His was the voice which called 
attention to the economic value to the State from 
proper fostering of our fish and game resources! His 
was the voice which called attention to the great 
amount of money spent throughout the State by 
sportsmen in pursuit of their recreation and pleasure. 
His was the voice which told of, to my mind, the 
greatest boon which a goodly supply of fish and game 
bestows upon mankind, that of the incentive to take 
our thousands of overworked humanity afield for 
neded recreation and health. It was such senti- 
ments, and the knowledge and belief that he had the 
backbone to fight for such a cause, which resulted 
in Mr. Payne's election as president of that associ- 
ation. 

That the State Fish Commission has recognized 
the assistance and importance of the state associ- 
ation and County Game and Protective Associations 
is manifest by reierring to the regular biennial 
reports of the Fish Commissioners, sent to the 
Governor since the organization of these game pro- 
tective associations. 

The State association grew rapidly in numbers 
and influence, and by the assistance of the Fish 
Commission in securing the services of Mr. Payne 
and Mr. Welch, its membership had reached to 
eighty odd county organizations throughout the 
State, numbering many thousand sportsmen, who 
have imbibed the spirit of game protection and 
have done good work in their various localities. 

At the annual meetings of the California Fish 
and Game Protective Association, the State Fish 
Commissioners have been urged to meet with us, 
that in discusing needed game and fish legislation 
and all matters concerning the welfare of our work 
their counsel might be added to the deliberations 
of our meetings and result in our game and fish 



bills being presented to the Legislature by our 
State Fish Commissioners, backed up by the State 
association and its entire membership. 

I ask you, Mr. Sportsman, no matter from whence 
you hail, was it not reasonable to expect that the 
Fish Commissioners would hail with delight the op- 
portunity to meet with and counsel with the people of 
the State who were sacrificing their time and money 
to assist in the work of game protection? 

I ask you, gentlemen, if it was not their duty to 
assist the sportsmen in every way possible whom 
they had urged to organize and prepare for the 
fray? In answering these questions with your own 
conscience, gentlemen, forget the identity of the 
writer and consult your own welfare and that of 
this State and her people. The State Fish Commis- 
sioners, in the seven years' existence of the State 
Fish and Game Protective Association, never once 
honored us with their presence and counsel, which 
was always asked for and expected, until our 
seventh annual meeting, which was held in Mon- 
terey last November, and then they came not to 
counsel and offer words of wisdom and good cheer 
in the interests of a good cause, but rather they 
sought to intimidate that loyal band of game pro 
tectionists from doing their full duty, an inkling oi 
what was to occur having brought them there. It 
now becomes necessary to go back a few years in 
our work to make it clear to those acquainted with 
our struggle for game preservation that the action 
of the State Fish and Game Protective Association 
at Monterey was proper and right. That the people 
may know the motives which prompted the Fish 
Commissioners, in company with a few of Sacra- 
mento County Association's members, to pay their 
first visit to the association which has done so 
much to aid the cause of game protection, it will 
be necessary to give in full the report of the Exec- 
utive Committee. 

"Whereas, The attention of your Executive Com- 
mttee has been repeatedly called to the many and 
constant violations of the game and fish laws 
throughout the State of California, and the neglect 
and refusal of the State Board of Fish Commission- 
ers to enforce these laws, particularly the sale of 
wild game and fish during the closed seasons, and 
the possession of more than the legal bag limit, 
thereby working serious injury to the fish and game 
interests of the State; therefore, be it 

"Resolved, By the California Fish and Game Pro- 
tective, in annual meeting assembled, that the policy 
of the present Board of Fish Comimssioners is detri- 
mental to the best interests of the game and fish 
and is diametrically opposed to the purposes for 
which the money of the .axpayers of the State has 
been, and is being appropriated. 

"Resolved, That the California Game and Fish Pro- 
tective Association do hereby emphatically condemn 
the manner in which the office of the State Board 
of Fish Commissioners is now being conducted. 

"Resolved, That this Association declare for a 
Fish Commission composed of men whose fidelity 
in game and fish protection has never been ques- 
tioned, whose devotion to the enforcement of our 
laws will never tire, whose private interests will 
not prevent the necessary attention which the con- 
duct of its affairs demand, and one that will recog- 
nize the assistance and support of the sportsmen 
of the State as a strong ally in the cause of game 
protection." 

As will be seen by the above resolutions, the Exec- 
utive Committee of the California Fish and Game 
Protective Association felt it their duty to enter 
their protest against the manner in which the State 
Fish Commission was being conducted, and the vote 
which was taken upon the motion to adopt the above 
resolutions, after five hours' debate, set at rest 
all doubts as to whether or not the association was 
of the same opinion. 

Please note right here that the Fish Commission, 
who had honored the State Association for the first 
time in seven years, after this vote, and before the 
regular business of the association had been taken 
up, packed up their doll rags and retired in great 
confusion and disorder, taking the next train for 
their respective homes. Those are the gentlemen 
who will be at Sacramento opposing all effective and 
important game law legislation. 

Two years ago last November the State meeting 
was held in Visalia. The F'ish Commissioners were 
urged to attend, as it was a legislative year and 
more game legislation was needed. Did they come? 

Among other things decided upon by the associa- 
tion then represented was a bag limit for ducks of 
twenty-five. 

The Sacramento County Association was the only 
association which voted against it. The State Asso- 
ciation, also, favored and presented to the legis- 
lature a bill asking for the non-sale of ducks. The 
State Fish Commission, two years ago, worked 
against a reduction of the bag limit and also against 
the non-sale. 

Was that consistent work for game preservation? 
Does it seem to you that six or eight years of such 
policy is long enough for one set of commissioners? 
For two years we have had a law which declares 
that "every person, who, during any one calendar 



day, takes, kills, or destroys, or has in his posses- 
sion more than fifty wild ducks, is guilty of a mis- 
demeanor." 

This law has been violated every day of the open 
seasons, both last season and this. It is common 
knowledge among all sportsmen of San Francisco 
and throughout the State. 

Repeated complaints to the Fish Commission 
avails nothing. They turn a deaf ear to the sports- 
men of California. Do you think this is performing 
the duties imposed upon the Fish Commission? Will 
you sit idly by and make no protest? The "Hunters' 
Transfer Company," apparently organized to evade 
the law, has been and are to-day handling thousands 
of ducks daily! Why did not the Fish Commission 
arrest them the first day they opened for busi- 
ness? 

We note just recently, after nearly two years of 
flagrant violations, they did arrest the Hunters' 
..ransfer Company for violating the game law. They 
paid a fine of $25. Was not that sufficient evidence 
of their guilt? Why did not the Commissioners ar- 
rest them the next day? And the next? And when 
they had been haled before the court two or three 
times, perhaps the court would make their fine 
$100. And perhaps the next offense they would get 
the limit. Perhaps then they would want to test 
the law. That is what our Commission is for, to 
accommodate them; yea, to insist! 

Are they sidestepping their plain duties? Yes. 
They are, and always have. What is the remedy? 
A new Commission, composed of true sportsmen. 
Have you any confidence in the present policy as 
being maintained? 

Then do your duty as a citizen and a sportsman. 
Appeal to the Governor to give us a new Fish Com- 
mission. Work for the proposed changes in our 
game laws. Don't fail to "lock the stable before the 
horse is stolen." Make restrictive laws before the 
game is quite annihilated. 

Take advantage of the many object lessons which 
we have access to. Stand by the California Fish 
and Game Protective Association, which is your 
friend; which has been working for your good; and 
will continue to do so, if the sportsmen of this State 
will but stop to consider, then act. 

o 

PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIALS. 



Bakersfield, January 23. — The twenty-fourth an- 
nual trials of the Pacific Coast Field Trials Club 
began on the trial grounds near this city on Mon- 
day morning. Although an early start was made, 
weather and ground conditions — a heavy fog pre- 
vailing — made it impossible to put down the first 
brace in the Derby until 10:35 a. m. There were 14 
starters in the Derby — 10 English Setters and 4 
Pointers. Birds were plentiful and cover favorable 
for working the young dogs. The Derby was fin- 
ished late Tuesday afternoon and after a short con- 
sultation by the judges the winners announced were: 

E. Courtney Ford's English Setter bitch Tiburon 
(Uncle Jimmie Whitestone-Belle Fontaine) first. 
Jos. E. Terry's English Setter bitch Shasta Daisy 
(Kilgarif-Ione S.) second. W. G. Kerchoff's English 
Setter bitch Ventura (Harry H.-Peachmark II.) and 
Howard B. Smith's Pointer dog Colton (Dr. Dan- 
iels-Lottie Ripstone) equal third. 

The performance of the Derby dogs was hardly 
up to expectation in most instances, although at 
times there was a good showing of individual class 
that varied the tameness of the stake as compared 
with a number of the club's past Derby events. 

The All-Age stake was commenced this morning 
with 10 starters — 7 English Setters and 3 Pointers. 
This morning the fog obscured the landscape and 
saturated the cover to the extent of delaying the 
start until 11 o'clock. The first series was finished 
to-day and with the exception of one heat, the fourth, 
between J. E. 1'erry's English Setter bitch Ramona 
(Ch. Kilgarif-Belle of the Ball) and Albert Betz's 
English Setter dog Merry Dude (Fairland Dude- 
Merry Heart), was nonproductive of any great re- 
sults. An exception, however, might be made to 
the work of the second brace, Wm. Dormer's English 
Setter dog Mariposa (Detroit Joe-Counts' Mark) and 
Stockdale Kennels Pointer bitch Petronella (Young 
Jingo-Florida). The first pair mentioned produced 
the first output of anything that bordered on the 
kind of bird work sometimes described as "sensa- 
tional." Mariposa and Petronella also made a pleas- 
ing showing. This quartette will be knocking at 
the door when the awards are made. The second 
series will begin on Thursday morning. On the 
conclusion of the All-Age, the Members' Stake will 
probably finish the meeting. 

Hon. Chas. N. Post of Sacramento, Henry L. Bet- 
ten of Alameda and Tudor J. A. Tiedemann of San 
Francisco judged the Derby. In the All-Age, Mr. 
J. W. Flynn of San Francisco acted in place of 
Judge Post. 

The attendance of club members and visiting 
sportsmen has been very good, far better than an- 
ticipated, considering the jar that many of the 
club members and owners of eligible dogs received, 
directly and indirectly, nine months ago. 

Besides the purses in the three events above 
named there will be three cups awarded the three 
winners in each stake. 

The trials will probably be- concluded on Friday 
forenoon — unless it is decided to run a Champion- 
ship Stake, which will run the meeting over until 
Saturday. A full report of the trials will appear 
in next week's issue. J. X. DeWITT. 
o 

California's favorite hot waather drink it Jackwn'g 
Napa Soda. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



f Saturday, January 26, 1907. 



PACIFIC COAST HANDICAP. 



It has been decided by the Interstate Association 
to hold the third Pacific Coast Handicap at Spokane, 
Wash., under the auspices of the Spokane Rod and 
Gun Club. The dates suggested are September 10, 
11 and 12. 

Mr. Elmer E. Shaner will visit Spokane several 
weeks in advance of the shoot and assist the Spo- 
kane sportsmen in arranging matters. 

The Spokane club will raise a fund of $500 to be 
added to the purses. The national association will 
donate a like amount, $100 of which will be used 
for the trophy in the Interstate Association Pacific 
States Handicap event and $50 of which will be used 
to purchase the trophy in the Preliminary Handicap. 

It will also be necessary for the club to enlarge 
the grounds at Natatorium Park in order to install 
a third set of traps. At present there are two sets, 
but three will be necessary to conduct the shoot as 
it should be. The trouble anticipated is to secure 
permission to remove a few of the trees which pre- 
vent the installing of the traps at present. 

•The shoot will have to be held at Natatorium 
Park or not at Spokane," said T. B. Ware. "We 
have hunted the country over for another site on 
account of the background at Natatorium, which is 
not everything to be desired. We have never been 
able to find a suitable location where there was 
absolutely no danger to outsiders. At Natatorium 
we shoot across the river against a high bluff and 
there is no possible danger. For this reason we have 
stuck to the site." 



The Western Handicap will take place at Denver 
August 20, 21 and 22. 



Good Quail Shooting South. 

These cold days have made quite a hit with the 
Los Angeles quail hunters, and a veritable army of 
them have left for favorite grounds in the vallev or 
farther. j 4 j 

The usual effect of cold weather is to drive the 
birds down out of the hills into the washes and low- 
lands nearer their food supply. The dampness of 
the ground makes scenting conditions good and 
those who have dogs would do well to take them 
along. 

Notwithstanding that the San Fernando Valley 
has been tramped over Sundays for nearly three 
months, and during the week to boot, and the" further 
fact that the 7 o'clock Southern Pacific trains morn- 
ing and evening are, to all intents and purposes, 
hunters' trains, loaded going and coming with gun- 
ners, there are still some birds in the washes. 

Limits are scarce, but bags of from ten to twenty- 
five are not so rare. Those who have good dogs can 
do well enough. The brush is so heavv in many sec- 
tions of the valley this year that hunters declare 
they lose as many birds as they pick up and have to 
knock down about forty in order to retrieve twenty- 
five. The aid of a good retriever is, therefore, almost 
essential in such times as the present, when he can 
run all day without becoming a bother and a charge 
upon his master. 



Duck Preserve May Be Taken Away. 

District Attorney Benjamin of Napa filed a com- 
plaint last week against E. H. Forriester as a result 
of the suit recently settled by which judgment fav- 
orable to duck hunters was rendered against For- 
rister. Application for 302 acres alleged to be swamp 
and overfloflwed land near Santa Rosa drawbridge 
was filed by Forriester in the office of the Surveyor 
General in 1905, and in January of the following year 
a certificate of purchase was issued. Upon acquiring 
possession of the land Forriester attempted to pre- 
vent duck hunters from trespassing. He lost the 
case in the Superior Court. Attorney General Webb 
has now directed District Attorney Benjamin to pro- 
ceed against Forriester and have the certificate of 
purchase cancelled on the ground that the affidavit 
made by Forriester was fraudulent and untrue in that 
the 302 acres mentioned are not swamp land, but a 
navigable body of water. 



Blue Rock Shoot at Calistoga. 

The new year was ushered in in grand style by the 
shotgun enthusiasts of Calistoga on the springs 
ground during the afternoon. There were fifteen 
shooters on hand, the main event being a twentv- 
five bird match for a handsome Dupont trophy for 
amateurs, which was given by Chas. McCullough. 
Harry Coulter won the trophy with a score of 21 out 
of 25 birds. Mark Doda was second with a score of 
19 birds and C. J. Greer third with 18 birds. Over 
a hundred people were on the grounds enjoving the 
sport. 

After the main event considerable shooting was in- 
dulged in and better scores made than in the trophy 
contest. The boys are going to organize a gun club 
to show that they can shoot as well as any one after 
they have become more accustomed to the game. 
They hope to be in a position to issue a challenge 
to any of the nearby town clubs just as soon as 
weather conditions improve. 



A Fine Catalogue. 

We are under obligations to Col. .1. W. Brooks 
for a copy of Ascot Boston Terrier Kennels catalogue. 

The book is beautifully illustrated and a high class 
specimen of the printer's art. 

It is full of information of more than passing in- 
terest to lovers of the breed and should be in the 
possession of every owner of a Boston Terrier. One 
an. no doubt, be obtained by addressing Col. J. W. 
Brooks, 401 West 33d street, Los Angeles. 



THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB, INC. 



TO THE SECRETARIES AND DELEGATES OF 

THE ACTIVE MEMBERS— 
Office of the American Kennel Club ( Incorporated) , 
55 Liberty Street, New York, December 29, 1906: 



(Continued from last week.) 



Number of Delegates Present at Quarterly Meetings 
During Five Years, and Names of Clubs 
Represented. 
1904. 
February. 

American Dachshund Club, Dr. C. Motschenbacher. 

Atlantic City Kennel Club, J. S. Price. 

Bar Harbor Kennel Club, C. B. Pineo. 

Bay State Co-Operative Bench Show Association, 
S. R. Cutler. 

Boston Terrier Club, Dwight Moore. 

Bryn Mawr Kennel Club, J. A. Caldwell. 

Bulldog Club of America, W. C. Codman. 

Bull Terrier Club of America, Frank H. Croker. 

Chicago Kennel Club, E. S. Woodward. 

Collie Club of America, M. M. Palmer. 

Columbus Fanciers' Club, J. M. Taylor. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 

Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 

Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts. 
Henry Jarrett. 

Long Island Kennel Club, Joseph M. Dale. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 

Milwaukee Kennel Club, Dr. D. D. Jennings. 

New England Beagle Club, John Caswell. 

New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 

Pointer Club of America, A. H. Ball. 

San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 

Scottish Terrier Club of America, R. F. Perkins. 

Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. . 

Texas Kennel Club, George W. Clayton. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 

Westminster Kennel Club, R. H. Williams. 

Wissachikon Kennel Club, D. Murray Bohlen. 
May. 

Atlantic City Kennel Club, J. S. Price Jr. 

Bay State Co-Operative Bench Show Association, 
S. R. Cutler. 

Boston Terrier Club, Dwight Moore. 

Chicago Kennel Club, E. S. Woodward. 

Columbus Fanciers' Club, J. M. Taylor. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 

Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 

New Jersey Kennel Club, C. G. Hopton. 

Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 

St. Louis Collie Club, Daniel Buckley. 

The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Jersey City Kennel Club, G. M. McCarthy. 
Irish Setter Club, J. J. Donohue. 
Collie Club of America, E. J. Vam Schaick. 
Japanese Spaniel Club, W. J. Berg. 

September. 

Bay State Co-Operative Bench Show Association, 
S. R. Cutler. 

Boston Terrier Club, Dwight Moore. 
Bryn Mawr Kennel Club, J. A. Caldwell. 
Bulldog Club of America, W. C. Codman. 
Collie Club of America, E. J. Van Schaick. 
Great Dane Club of America, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
Japanese Spaniel Club, W. J. Berg. 
Long Island Kennel Club, Joseph M. Dale. 
.Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
Spaniel Breeders' Association, M. A. Viti. 
Westminster Kennel Club, R. H. Williams. 
Russian Wolfhound Club, Dr. J. E. De Mund. 
Englewood Kennel Club, M. W. Robinson. 
December. 

Airedale Terrier Club of America, W. L. Barclay. 

American Spaniel Club. H. K. Bloodgood. 

Atlantic City Kennel Club, J. S. Price. 

Bay State Co-Operative Bench Show Association, 
S. R. Cutler. 

Bryn Mawr Kennel Club, J. A. Caldwell. 

Bulldog Club of America, W. C. Codman. 

Bull Terrier Club of America, Frank H. Croker. 

Chicago Kennel Club, E. S. Woodward. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, 
Henry Jarrett. 

New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 

Rhode Island Kennel Club, William Codman. 

Russian Wolfhound Kennel Club, Dr. J. E. De 
Mund. 

Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
St. Louis Collie Club, Daniel Buckley. 
The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Westminster Kennel Club, H. T. Peters. 
Wissahickon Kennel Club, D. Murray Bohlen. 
Madison Athletic Association, C. Lester Jones. 

1905. 
February. 

American Dachshund Club, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
American Spaniel Club, H. K. Bloodgood. 



Atlantic Kennel Club, J. S. Price. 

Bay State Co-Operative Bench Show Association, 
S. R. Cutler. 

Boston Terrier Club, F. H. Osgood. 

Bryn Mawr Kennel Club, J. W. Mitchell. 

Bulldog Club of America, W. C. Codman. 

Canonsburg Kennel Club, C. Motschenbacher. 

Collie Club of America, E. J. Van Schaick. 

Columbus Fanciers' Association, J. M. Taylor. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

French Bulldog Club of America, F. J. Bristol. 

Great Dane Club of America, O. H. Albanesius. 

Irish Setter Club, J. J. Donohue. 

Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, H. 
Jarrett. 

Long Island Kennel Club, Joseph M. Dale. 
Madison Athletic Association, E. L. Jones. 
Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
New England Collie Club, Tom B. Middlebrooke. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
New Jersey Kennel Club, C. G. Hopton. 
Philadelphia Dog Show Association, C. B. New- 
bold. 

Russian Wolfhound Club, Dr. J. E. De Mund. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
St. Louis Collie Club. Daniel Buckley. 
Texas Kennel Club, George W. Clayton. 
Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Westminster Kennel Club, H. T. Peters. 
Wissahickon Kennel Club, D. Murray Bohlen. 
May. 

Airedale Terrier Club of America, W. L. Barclay. 

American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 

American Dachshund Club, G. Muss-Arnolt. 

American Pomeranian Club, F. S. Stedman. 

American Spaniel Club, H. K. Bloodgood. 

Atlantic City Kennel Club, J. S. Price. 

Boston Terrier Club, F. H. Osgood. 

Bryn Mawr Kennel Club, J. W. Mitchell. 

Bull Terrier Club, Clair Foster. 

Canonsburg Kennel Club, C. Motschenbacher. 

Dalmatian Club of America, J. B. Thomas Jr. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania. 
G. M. Carnochan. 

Englewood Kennel Club, M. W. Robinson. 
French Bulldog Club, R. H. Hunt. 

Great Dane Club of A . . i«-a, O. H. Albanesius. 

Irish Terrier Club of America, S. Van Schaick. 

.Japanese Spaniel Club, W. J. Berg. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, E. 
Brooks. 

Long Island Kennel Club, Joseph M. Dale. 
Madison Athletic Association, E. L. Jones. 
Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
Oakland Kennel Club, S. C. Mastick. 
Russian Wolfhound Club, Dr. J. E. De Mund. 
San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 
Scottish Terrier Club, Theo. Offerman. 
Seattle Dog Fanciers' Association, James Watson. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
St. Louis Collie Club, Daniel Buckley. 
The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Westminster Kennel Club, H. T. Peters. 
Wissahickon Kennel Club, R. H. Johnson Jr. 

September. 
Airedale Tererier Club, J. H. Brookfield. 
American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 
American Dachshund Club, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
Atlantic City Kennel Club, J. Sargeant Price Jr. 
Bull Terrier Club, Clair Foster. 
Englewood Kennel Club, Myron W. Robinson. 
Irish Setter Club, L. M. D. McGuire. 
Japanese Spaniel Club, William J. Berg. 
Long Island Kennel Club, Joseph M. Dale. 
Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
New England Co-llie Club, T. B. Middlebrooke. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
Oakland Kennel Club, S. C. Mastick. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, M. A. Viti. 
Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Philadelphia Pointer Club, Osgood Sayen. 
Champion Kennel Club, A. D. Gillette. 

December. 

Airedale Terrier Cub of New York, J. H. Brook- 
fied. 

American Fox Terrier Club. H. H. Hunnewell. 
American Dachhund Club, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
American Pomeranian Club, F. S. Stedman. 
American Spaniel Club, H. P. Bloodgood. 
Boston Terrier Club, F. H. Osgood. 
Bull Terrier Breeders' Association, John W. Brit- 
ton II. 

Champion Kennel Club, Abram D. Gillette. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

French Bulldog Club of America, Richard H. Hunt. 

Great Dane Club of America, O. H. Albanesius. 

Inter-State Fair Kennel Club, H. S. Spackman. 

Irish Setter Club, Lawrence M. D. McGuire. 

Irish Terrier Club of America, Singleton Van 
Schaick. 

Jersey City Kennel Club, George M. McCarthy. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, Ed- 
ward Brooks. 

Madison Athletic Association, E. L. Jones. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. E. R. Drake. 

National Beagle Club. Jas. W. Appleton. 

New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 

Rockland County Industrial Association, Monson 
Morris. 

Russian Wolfhound Club. Dr. J. E. De Mund. 



Saturday, January 26, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 
Scottish Terrier Club of America, Theo. Offerman. 
Seattle Dog Fanciers' Association, James Watson. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, Marcel A. Viti. 
The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Toy Spaniel Club of America, S. L. Goldenberg. 
Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 
Westminster Kennel Club, Harry T. Peters. 
Portland Kennel Club, E. J. Van Schaick. 
Wisconsin Kennel Club, Charles W. Keyes. 
Cedarhurst Kennel Club, John G. Bates. 
Spokane Kennel Club, S. C. Mastick. 
Brockton District Kennel Club, Dr. George W. Ryan. 
Philadelphia Collie Club, S. Boyd Carrigan. 

1906. 
February. 

Airedale Terrier Club of America, J. H. Brookfield. 
American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 
American Dachhund Club, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
American Spaniel Club, H. P. Bloodgood. 
Atlantic City Kennel Club, J. Sergeant Price Jr. 
Boston Terrier Club, F. H. Osgood. 
Brockton District Kennel Club, Dr. George W. 
Ryan. 

Bulldog Club of America, W. C. Codman. 
Bull Terrier Breeders' Association, John W. Brit- 
ton II. 

Bull Terrier Club of America, Clair Foster. 

Champlain Kennel Club, Abram D. Gillette. 

Chester Kennel Club, S. Crozier Robinson. 

Colorado Kennel Club, Richard Croker Jr. 

Collie Club of America, R. E. Edson. 

Inter-State Fair Kennel Club, H. S. Spackman. 

Irish Setter Club, Lawrence M. D. McGuire. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, Ed- 
ward Brooks. 

Long Island Kennel Club, Joseph M. Dale. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. E. R. Drake. 

New England Collie Club, Tom B. Middlebrooke. 

New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 

Philadelphia Dog Show Association, Clement B. 
Newboldt. 

Portland Kennel Club, E. J. Van Schaick. 
Rhode Island Kennel Club, William Codman. 
Rockland County Industrial Association, Monson 
Morris. 

Russian Wolfhound C 1 "' nr. J. E. De Mund. 
San Francisco Kennel' (Sot/'R. P. Keasbey. 
San Mateo Kennel Club, Howard Willets. 
Spaniel Breeders' Society, Marcel A. Viti. 
St. Louis Collie Club, Daniel Buckley. 
Taunton Kennel Club, John H. Church. 
Texas Kennel Club, George W. Clayton. 
Westminster Kennel Club, Harry T. Peters. 
May. 

Airedale Terrier Club of New York, J. H. Brookfield. 
American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 
Buffalo Kennel Club, George Bleistein. 
Bull Terrier Breeders' Association, John W. Brit- 
ton II. 

Bull Terrier Club of America, Clair Foster. 

Cedarhurst Kennel Club, John G. Bates. 

Champlain Kennel Club, Abram D. Gillette. 

Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, 
G. M. Carnochan. 

Franklin Kennel Club, William T. Payne. 

Irish Setter Club, Lawrence M. D. McGuire. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, Ed- 
ward Brooks. 

Long Island Kennel Club, Joseph M. Dale. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. E. R. Drake. 

New England Beagle Club, Chetwood Smith. 

New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 

Russian Wolfhound Club, Dr. J. E. De Mund. 

San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 

Scottish Terrier Kennel Club of America, Dr. H. 
T. Foote. 

Spaniel Breeders' Society, Marcel A. Viti. 
The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 
Mortimer. 

Welsh Terrier Club of America, B. S. Smith. 

September. 
Airedale Terrier Club, J. H. Brookfield. 
American Dachhund Club, G. Muss-Arnolt. 
American Fox Terrier Club, H. H. Hunnewell. 
American Spaniel Club, H. P. Bloodgood. 
Bryn Mawr Kennel Ciub, Robert E. Strawbridge. 
Bulldog Club of America, W. C. Codman. 
Bull Terrier Breeders' Association, John W. Brit- 
ton II. 

Cedarhurst Kennel Club, John G. Bates 
Champlain Kennel Club, Abram D. Gillette. 
Collie Club of America, R. S. Edson. 
Crotona Collie Club, William Ruff. 
Dalmatian Club of America, J. B. Thomas Jr. 
Haverhill Kennel Club, Mark A. Knipe. 
Inter-State Fair Kennel Club, H. S. Spackman. 
Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, Ed- 
ward Brooks. 

Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake. 
National Beagle Club, Jas. W. Appleton. 
New England Beagle Club, Chetwood Smith. 
New England Kennel Club, W. B. Emery. 
Pointer Club of America, Ancell H. Ball. 
Portland Kennel Club, Edwin A. Van Schaick. 
Revere Kenne* Club, Samuel R. Cutler. 
Rockland County Industrial Association, Monson 
• Morris. 

| Russian Wolfhound Club, Dr. J. E. De Mund. 

% Santa Cruz County Kennel Club, Edward Hance Jr. 

£ San Francisco Kennel Club, R. P. Keasbey. 

f Spaniel Breeders' Society, Marcel A. Viti. 

g The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, James 

7- Mortimer. 

4 Westminster Kennel Club, Harry T. Peters. 



The list discloses that there were present in: 

1901, at the February meeting, 25 delegates; at 
the May meeting, 16 delegates; at the September 
meeting, 16 delegates; at the December meeting, 15 
delegates; 

1902, at the February meeting, 18 delegates; at 
the May meeting, 14 delegates; at the September 
meeting, 9 delegates; at the December meeting, 21 
delegates; * 

1903, at the February meeting, 14 delegates; at 
the May meeting, 14 delegates; at the September 
meeting, 11 delegates; at the December meeting, 25 
delegates; 

1904, at the February meeting, 31 delegates; at 
the May meeting, 18 delegates; at the September 
meeting, 14 delegates; at the December meeting, 22 
delegates; 

1905, at the February meeting, 34 delegates; at 
the May meeting, 35 delegates; at the September 
meeting, 19 delegates; at the December meeting, 38 
delegates ; 

1906, at the February meeting, 34 delegates; at 
the May meeting, 23 delegates; at the September 
meeting, 31 delegates; 

showing an average attendance at the meetings of 
21 delegates, or 9 less than the present board of di- 
rectors, or at only six meetings out of twenty-three 
the present number of the board of directors had 
been exceeded, and those being the annual meetings 
where now, as under the constitution of the old club, 
all delegates can attend. 

Fourth — Under the constitution of the unincorpor- 
ated club the associate members were entitled to 
one delegate for each one hundred members, whereas 
under the constitution of the present club they are 
entitled to one delegate for each one hundred mem- 
bers up to three hundred and to two delegates for 
each one hundred members over that number, so 
that next year there will be seven delegates to be 
elected from Kae associate subscribers, being an in- 
crease of three over previous years. The associate 
subscriber of the incorporated club is the same as 
the associate member of the old club. The changes 
in name and in the constitution were made to comply 
with the United States postal laws governing the 
mailing of The Gazette as second-class mail matter. 
In addition to this, the quorum in the old club was 
but nine members, whereas in the present club it is 
twelve. At the first meeting of the board of direc- 
tors of the present club, twenty-one were present, 
being 70 per cent of the entire board. 

Fifth — In drafting the present constitution the 
committee was careful to avoid any changes that 
were not absolutely necessary in order to elect a 
directorship of thirty and provide for the manage- 
ment of the club by said board, and if any criticism 
is to be made because of the fact that the executive 
committee is constituted as it now is, it is simply 
because the incorporators declined to change what 
already had existed for many years. 

Sixth — There appears to have been considerable 
criticism as to the powers of the Executive Commit- 
tee of the incorporated club. As a matter of fact, 
the Executive Committee of the old club were the 
incorporators of the new club and by that fact were 
made directors. When it became necessary to elect 
an Executive Committee of the new club, the mem- 
bers of the Executive Board of the old club were 
elected such committee, and the powers of the pres- 
ent Executive Committee do not differ in any respect 
from the powers of the Executive Committee of the 
old club. 

The election of this executive committee had to 
be done by the members of the incorporated club 
before they increased their membership by taking 
in all of the members of the" old club, because, if all 
those members had been first taken in it would have 
been practically impossible to get a quorum to trans- 
act the necessary business. Accordingly, the incor- 
porators elected the officers and executive committee 
of the incorporated club and all the standing com- 
mittees, being identically the same personnel as in 
the unincorporated club. They then took in all the 
remaining members of the unincorporated club and 
came before it and said that they were duly incor- 
porated; that they had elected a board of directors, 
naming them; that they had elected the same offi- 
cers and the same executive committee and were 
ready to take over the unincorporated body, if it 
saw fit to so do. Thereupon the delegates, by unani- 
mous vote, transferred the property of the unincor- 
porated club to themselves as an incorporated body. 

It might be noted that the meeting of the old 
club, at which the transfer was made, was held pur- 
suant to notice duly sent to each delegate of the 
club as follows: 

"55 Liberty Street, New York. 

"Sir — Please take notice that there will be a special 
meeting of the American Kennel Club at No. 55 
Liberty Street, Room 35, in the city of New York, 
on Monday, November 19, at three o'clock in the 
afternoon, for the purpose of transferring all of the 
property, assets, effects and good will of the club 
to the American Kennel Club (Incorporated), in ac- 
cordance with the resolutions heretofore adopted, 
and for the transaction of such other business as 
may be necessary to achieve this end. 

"By order of the President. 

"A. P. VREDENBURGH, Secretary." 

That at said meeting there was read the report of 
the committee on incorporation, stating that the con- 
stitution called for a board of thirty directors, nam- 
ing those who had been elected; that that report was 
unanimously accepted and adopted, and that when 
the resolutions were presented to transfer the prop- 
erty to the incorporated club Mr. Belmont called the 
attention of the delegates to the fact that it was a 



very important matter and asked if any one present 
desired to have a rollcall. A rollcall was not called 
for and every delegate present voted in favor of 
the resolutions. 

It may be advisable to call the attention of the 
members to the fact that twenty-five clubs have 
never appointed delegates, and that in addition twen- 
ty-nine delegates appointed by clubs have never at- 
tended a single meeting during the year 1906. 

The undersigned committee for the American Ken- 
nel Club, Incorporated, requests the secretaries and 
delegates of all Specialty Clubs to present this re- 
port to all of their members, and the press is re- 
spectfully requested to print same verbatim. 

Messrs. H. T. Peters and James Mortimer are 
hereby appointed a sub-committee to read the above 
report to the meeting called for on January 3, 1907, 
to be held at the Ashland House, New York City. 

MARCEL A. VITI, 
H. T. PETERS, 
JAMES MORTIMER, 
HOWARD WILLETS, 
A. P. VREDENBURGH. 

1 — o 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



Portland Show. 

Frank E. Wat kins, secretary of the Port land Ken- 
nel Club, has sent out cards announcing the annual 
meeting of the club on January 24. At the last meet- 
ing of the members the Portland Kennel Club was 
incorporated and this will be the first meeting held 
under the new by-laws. 

One of the important matters that will come up at 
this meeting will be the selection of the place to 
hold the next bench show. This has always been a 
serious problem with the club, for it has been a mat- 
ter of considerable difficulty to get desirable exhibi- 
tion quarters. In all probability the show this year 
will be held in Merrill's Hall. Fred Merrill has in- 
formed the officials of the club that he is willing to 
permit the use of the hall for that purpose. 

Formerly the dogs were shown at the Exposition 
Hall, but some of the fanciers have objected because 
the building was hardly warm enough. There is 
some talk among the club members of acquiring a 
building near the center of the city and making it 
the permanent home of the bench show. 

Members of the club are planning to make the 
coming bench show a record-breaker. During the 
past year there has been an enthusiasm over well 
bred canines such as has never before been known 
in that city and they expect more dogs to be on the 
bench at the coming show than in any former year. 
Many Portland sportsmen recently have bought high- 
class dogs, especially Setters and Retrievers. Billy 
Lipman has purchased two field dogs, both of which 
have won championships in field trials and will be 
shown. There are also several new English Bulldogs 
that will attract attention. 

The officials of the club expect a greater number 
of dogs of all breeds than ever before from Caifornia, 
Washington and British Coumbia. 



What the Eastern Press Says. 

A storm of protests in the greeting for the report 
of the committee on "reasons for change of govern- 
ment" of the A. K. C. The Eastern press has taken 
up the matter, at the instance of various fanciers. 
Among other papers we quote below the New York 
Sun and New York Journal, respectively: 

"Just where August Belmont, as president of the 
American Kennel Club, stood in regard to what they 
termed the snap incorporation and new constitution 
seemed to bother many speakers at the meeting in 
the Ashland House yesterday. The majority's hope 
was that as a sportsman he had been led astray by 
certain too zealous associates of the executive com- 
mittee, who had taken the three year-old deed of 
incorporation up and had it put into action, backed 
by a constitution that deprived all the clubs of rep- 
resentation at the quarterly and annual meetings. 
Dr. F. H. Osgood, delegate of the Boston Terrier 
Club, thought that Belmont had been deceived by 
his associates. Dr. Osgood was chairman of the 
meeting. 'As practically founder of the American 
Kennel Club and an amateur of fine dogs,' said Dr. 
Osgood, 'Mr. Belmont would not be one to cut off 
at one stroke the sporting comradeship and substi- 
tute a coldblooded business directorship or dictator- 
ship. We have all been honored to meet as amateurs 
to discuss the interests of the dog. Unless the mat- 
ter went before Mr. Belmont in a biased way I do 
not think he would have sanctioned disfranchisement 
of any club delegate or have taken up the papers 
of incorporation save after a vote at an annual meet- 
ing.' " 

"When the American Kennel Club, an association 
of clubs interested in the breeding of dogs, was in- 
corporated in 1903, August Belmont, the president, 
was intrusted with the work of incorporation. The 
result was shown yesterday when thirty representa- 
tives of the various clubs gathered at the Ashland 
House and formally approved the draft of certain 
proposed amendments to the constitution, opposing 
Belmont's methods. The amendments were then 
filed with the secretary of the American Kennel Club 
and action will be taken on them at the annual meet- 
ing in February. The purpose of the amendments is 
to regain control of the organization, which is now 
practically lodged in a close corporation, which the 
members are calling the 'dog trust.' The directors 
appointed under Belmont's control are not even dele- 
gates from the clubs in the big association, and it is 
mentioned as a matter of scandal that some of 
them haven't any kennel interests, unless it be of 
the frankfurter variety." 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SP ORTSMAN 



4» 4. *j. «|» ♦$» »*♦*$. **< ►j. *$• .j. *J»-*$» *JnJ«J» *I* *J» *t* *J* *♦* *5* *I* •** 

f THE FARM f 

v *H* •J**!**!* *?* 4* *J* *J* *** *5* *J* *»* *5* *5* *J* *** *i* 

PURE MILK WILL KEEP. 



[Saturday, January 26, 1907. 



The United States Department of 
Agriculture has just issued a bulle- 
tin on the milk and cream exhibit 
at the last Noational Dairy Show at 
Chicago. In it is described the means 
taken by exhibitors to ensure purity 
in the milk. The gold medal milk 
was from a herd consisting of choice, 
pure bred and grade Jerseys, number- 
ing about thirty milking cows. It is 
the practice of the owner to raise 
heifer calves from the best cows. The 
barn is well lighted and ventilated, 
the uoors are of cement, and the walls 
and ceilings are kept thoroughly 
whitewashed. The manure from the 
stables is hauled direct to the field. 

The feed used in this dairy consists 
of corn silage (well eared), shredded 
corn stover and mixed hay for rough- 
age, the grain part consisting of 
wheat, bran and middlings, and buck- 
wheat middlings, besides the corn , in 
the silage. Care is taken during milk- 
ing to have little dust as possible in 
the barn. The cows are kept thorough- 
ly clean. The milk from each cow is 
weighed after milking, and as soon 
as a small can is filled it is taken 
to a separate building used only for 
handling milk. Here the milk is 
strained through a wire strainer and 
three cloth strainers and stored in 
cold water until bottled. ' After bot- 
tling the milk is placed in cases and 
packed in ice ready for delivery. All 
dairy utensils are rinsed, washed, 
scalded with boiling water and 
drained. The herd is tuberculin test- 
ed and great care is exercised to 
keep it healthy. 

The milk retails at 6 cents per 
quart throughout the year in a small 
town of 3,000 inhabitants. The own- 
ers take much pride in producing 
clean milk, free from dangerous 
germs. 

The object of this , contest was 
wholly educational. It' was desired 
to show that milk and cream pro- 
duced under sanitary conditions could 
be shipped long distances and held 
for several weeks without any other 
means of preservation than cleanli- 
ness and cold. The results were 
most gratifying, and some of the 
samples remained perfectly sweet 
after being shipped a thousand miles 
across the country, put in storage at 
a temperature of about 32 degrees 
Fahrenheit for two weeks, and then 
reshipped a distance of 900 miles to 
Washington, D. C, where they were 
stored in an ordinary ice box for 
several weeks longer, some of the 
certified milk samples being still 
sweet after five weeks. A part of a 
box of cream entered in this contest 
was placed in cold storage in Chicago 
at a temperature of 33 degrees Fah- 
renheit, and remained sweet and 
palatable for a period of seven weeks. 



STARTING THE WINTER LAYERS. 

All hens that begin moulting about 
August 1st should be laying again by 
the middle of October, and if they 
are bred right and fed right they 
should lay without a break until April. 
Those that appear listless a ad look 
dull about the head can be made 
smart and profitable in two weeks 
with special care. Pen them off by 
themselves and give no food at all for 
twenty-four hours. The next morning 
they start off with one good thing— 
an appetite. Take stale bread, the 
harder the better, and soak in luke- 
warm water, squeeze between your 
hands as dry as possible. Sprinkle 
this with a little black pepper and 
quite a lot of fine charcoal. Give the 
ailing hens all they can eat up in five 
minutes. Then throw a fine grain 
ration in the litter and see that the 
litter is deep. Six inches is good — 
a foQl_still better. A good grain mix- 
ture is composed of hard old wheat, 
cracked corn, buckwheat and sun- 
flower seeds. Give a quart for every 
ten hens penned off. This will keep 
the hens busy every minute up to 
five o'clock. Then give all the whole 
corn they will eat. Cracked corn is 
good, but is not eaten as heartily as 
whole corn. Sharp grit, oyster shells, 
dry bran and charcoal should be 
hung up in each coop. Next morning 



instead of bread give all the chopped 
up raw meat the hens will eat up 
clean in three minutes. If you have 
a butchering plant in your neighbor- 
hood where they slaughter sheep or 
pigs you can buy the plucks, which 
contain the heart, liver and lungs at 
$5 per hundred plucks, which will 
bring the fresh meat at half a cent 
a pound. 

These can be had from the whole- 
sale meat houses, also in all large 
cities. After the meat is eaten give 
the quart of grain in the litter and 
again the corn at night. Grass, clover 
or hung-up cabbage do well for green 
food, and some green ration should 
be supplied. The hen or early-hatched 
pullet that does not lay in three weeks 
under this treatment is out of her 
class as a winter layer and should 
be marketed unless an exceptional 
show bird. 



-o- 



MONEY IN SHEEP. 



Sheep, so far as pure bred flocks 
are concerned, easily lead on the con- 
tinent, as proved at World's Fairs for 
thirteen years. But when we turn 
to consider the flocks kept for com- 
mon market supplies, why a telescope 
would not bring them to view in many 
of our counties, and that in spite of 
the fact that no animal on the farm 
has during the past ten years given 
so much clear profit with so little 
labor. With lambs selling as at pres- 
ent, in leading markets, at the highest 
price on record for the time of year, 
viz., $8 per hundred, live weight, need 
we be surprised that not a few are 
bemoaning their short sightedness, 
and feel like giving themselves a 
tongue thrashing, if not more than 
that. 

Live stock and productions are 
rapidly making Ontario, Canada, 
famous. The writer will venture to 
predict that the Province of Ontario 
will be to the Western world what 
Britain is to the world at large, and 
that is the breeding ground for im- 
proved live stock, to more fully supply 
the ever growing demands from the 
Western Provinces, as well as those 
to the East, and the large country 
to the South, with its knowledge of 
what Ontario breeders do in competi- 
tion with them in American show 
yards. 

o 

CURING MEATS ON THE FARM. 



Meatscannot be long kept even in 
moderate weather, but beef may be 
corned, or pork cured in the follow- 
ing way, and it will be sweet and 
wholesome: 

For 150 pounds of meat, take one 
pound of granulated sugar, 1 quart 
table syrup, 3 ounces of saltpeter, 4 
ounces of sal soda and rock salt to 
make brine that will float an egg. Use 
water enough to cover the meat well. 
Boil and swim until it is white, then 
cool until milk warm and your over 
the meat. Change the position of the 
meat in the barrel each week. 

In three weeks, take out the meat 
and boil the brine, and skim, add one- 
half of the above ingredients and 
when it is cool, pour back on the 
meat. If pork or dried beef, take 
out in two or three weeks and smoke 
with cobs or hard wood. 

If you follow the directions exactly 
you will never lose any meat and will 
have as fine meat as you can find on 
the farket anywhere. You must not 
use the barrel salt if it has lime in it; 
and you must be sure to take your 
meat out every week and change it 
around so that the brine gets to 
every part of it. 

After it is smoked, wrap it in heavy 
d rapping paper, sew up in a cloth and 
paint it thick with whitewash. The 
dry beef is made from the round di- 
vided in chunks, as the seam between 
the muscles will show you. — American 
Farming World. 

o 

Self feeding appliances for sheep 
have been tried repeatedly, but they 
consume too much feed for each 
pound of gain when fed in this way. 

FOB SALE. 

Chestnut filly KE3RINA (two-year- 
old) by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Petrina 
(dam of Lady Petrina 2:27) by Pied- 
mont. This filly is very promising and 
is entered and fully paid up in the 
Breeders' Futurity No. 5 and the Occi- 
dent Stake for 1908. Apply to 
S. T. CORAM, 

Centerville. Cal. 



Cattle and sheep stand dry cold 
remarkably well, but they need pro- 
tection from storms. Feeding in open 
lots in all kinds of weather is bar- 
barous and it is not economical. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Gaustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or "Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 

As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., it is invaluable. 

Tivery bottle of Caustic Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to prive SHtlstaction. Price $1.50 
per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, witti full directions for 
its use. f?TSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 0. 



tea 



k 4 



Save=the= H orse' ' 

Registered 1*. S. Patent Office 

SPAVIN CURE 




Marshall. Minn. 
Troy Chemical Co.. Binghamton, N. Y. 

Gentlemen — "Save-the-Horse" has en- 
tirely removed the windpuff. It has 
been cured for a period of 30 days and 
has not returned under workouts. 

Yours very truly, 

W. W. SALISBURY. 

Webster City, la. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Gentlemen — 1 advised G. H. Daniels 
of this city to try a bottle of "Save- 
the-Horse" on a mare h« has that had 
a puff. The puff is now gone. 

Respectfully yours, 

J. F. DeFRANCE. 

Florence, S. C, Sept. 29, 1906. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs — Make me price on half 
dozen bottles "Save-the-Horse." It will 
certainly do the work. 

Yours truly, 

F. M. ROGER, JR. 

"SAVE - THE - HORSE" permanently 
cures Spavin Ringbone (except how), 
Curb, Thoroughpin, Splint, Shoe Boil, 
Wind Puff, Injured Tendons and all 
lameness, without scar or loss of hair. 
Horse works as usual. 

$5.00 PER BOTTLE, with a written 
guarantee, as binding to protect you 
as the best legal talent couhl make it. 
Send for a copy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Formerly Trov. N. Y. 

D. E. NEWELL, 

56 Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



Make your hens work for all they 
get to eat. Keep them moving about 
during the day as much as possible 
by throwing their feed in chaff, cut 
straw, shredded corn stalks or other 
material. Give them as much of a 
variety of grain as you possibly can. 
Wheat, oats cracked corn, barley and 
buckwheat are all good, but should 
be mixed together when fed. Never 
feed all one kind of grain at one time. 
They like a variety. For green food, 
second cutting clover is one of the 
best. Cabbage, carrots and mangel 
wurzels can also be fed to advantage. 
They should be fed meat of some kind 
at least three times a week. Beef 
scraps soaked and mixed with bran 
enough to take up the moisture an- 
swers this purpose. Skim milk added 
to the mash will give good results. 
Plenty of fresh water and grit should 
be where they can have access to it 
at all times. 



A vaccine affording protection 
against hog cholera has been discov- 
ered by scientists of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, says Sec- 
retary Wilson. The method has been 
patented by the department so that 
all may use it without extra cost 
or royalty. 



you receive letters 
having certajn 
words or phrases so 
emphasized in red they 
stick in your memory. 
They are written on 

The New Tri Chrome 
Smith Premier Typewriter 

The stenographer 
puts in the red letters 
as she goes along, by 
simply moving a small 
lever. 

This machine permits not only 
the use of a three-color ribbon, but 
also of a two-color or single-color 
ribbon. No extra cost for this new 
model. 

TnE 

Smith Premier Typewriter 
Company 

1211 Sutter St. 
San Francisco 



"BAG LI/UIT"- 

HAND LOADED SHELLS 

Our own make, and we're proud of them. 

Hand-loaded by our own experts. 

All the leading brands of powder used. 

If you want to strike the "bag limit" use our "Bag Limit" Hand- 
loaded Shells. 

BRITTAIN & CO. Inc. 

Everything in Hardware 

Van Ness Ave. and Turk St. 



Saturday, January 26, 1907.] 



THE BREEDE R AND S P O R T S M A N 



L3 



A Guide to Horse Boot veterinary dentistry 



Buying— Free 



The latest and greatest improve- 
ments in tiorse Boots — the re- 
sult of two years' planning, as- 
sisted by the advice and ideas 
of the master reinsmen of the 
country — will be found in our 
new catalogue. It shows more 
new patterns and improvements 
than any catalogue ever pub- 
lished. We are making the only 
absolutely new and up-to-date 
line of horse boots on' the mar- 
ket this year. Old styles and 
finish left far behind. Don't buy 
a dollar's worth until you see 
our new book. It's free. Write 
to-day. 




NOTICE THE SHAPE 

THE NEW "SELL" 

WIDE HEEL 
QUARTER BOOT 

An improvement in construction 
that you have waited for a long 
time — originated and perfected 
by us. This boot follows the 
natural lines of the hoof, fits 
closely and comfortably, and 
positively will not rub, pinch, 
chafe, bruise or injure the quar- 
ters or heels in any way. Our 
.improved method of pressing 
makes the shape permanent, and 
it will outwear any other quar- 
ter boot on the market. Beware 
of imitations of this boot. 

EXAMINE THE CUT 

and consider the following points: 

AT A A the curves are made 
correctly, permitting the 
straps to be drawn tightly 
without pinching or chafing 
the quarters. 

AT B B the curves prevent all 
danger of bruising the heels. 

AT C we have cut away part of 
the boot to show our Improv- 
ed Metal Gore Support. It 
holds the boot in position and 
prevents the stitching from 
ripping at the gore, and posi- 
tively will not injure the 
horse's heels. 




OURNEWVW 
UPSWING 
THE STRAPS 
ON THE WRAP 
PERS TO PRE- 
VENT CHAFING 



ANOTHER IMPROVEMENT 

See how the straps are sewed 
to the wrapper of the leg boots. 
All straps are sewed to a sep- 
arate piece of leather which is 
securely stitched to the wrapper. 
This prevents chafing and the 
straps will not pull off. Es- 
pecially good for boots with 
kersey wrappers. 

SELL BRAND 

Boots (formerly known as the 
Gilliam) are now carried in 
stock by the leading dealers in 
the West. For free catalogue 
address 

THE SELL HORSE GOODS CO. 
CANTON, OHIO. 




Ira Parker Dalziel, formerly of 605 Golden 
Gate Ave., is now permanently located at 

620 Octavia St., San Francisco 

Between Fulton and Grove Sts. 
Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional service.; to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. 

Complicated cases treated successfully. 
Calls from out of town promptly respon- 
ded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
620 Octavia St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Special 2074 



/\BS0RBINE 



Removes Bursal Knlarsrements, 
Thickened Tissues, Infiltrated 
rarts, and any Puff or Swelling, 
Cures Lameness, Allays Pain 
witlimit laying the horse up. T>nes not 
blist er, stain or remove the hair. 82.00 a 
bottle, delivered. Pamphlet 1-C free. 

AT5SORBINE, JR., for mankind, fil.00 
bottle.. Cures Synovitis, Weeping Sinew, 
Strains, Gouty or Rheumatic i>pposits, 
reduces Varicose Veins, Varicocele, Hydrocele. 
Allays pain. Book free. Genuine mfd. ouly by 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 
54 Monmouth Street Springfield, Mass 

For Sale by — 

Langley & Michaels, San Francisco. 
Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Western Wholesale Drug Co., Los 
Angeles, Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sac- 
ramento, Cal.; Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, 
Wash.; Spokane Drug Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Veterinary Experience 

Infallible guide to horse health. 
100 pace book, free. Symptoms 
of all diseases and treatment, 
by eminent veterinary, com- 
pounder of 

TUTTLE'S 
ELIXIR. 

Sure cure for curb, cciic, splint, recent shoe boils, 
most horse ailments. $100. reward for failure where 
we say it will cure. 

Tuttle's American Worm Powders never fail. 
• utile s family Elixir, greatest of all household 
lmime nts. Write for the book. 
TOTTLES ELIXIR CO., 52 Beverly St.. Boston. Mass. 

Redin^ton & Co., Third St., near Townsend, San Francisco. 
W. A Shaw, Los Angeles, Calif., Agents. 



RACING! 





STOCK GET JUST ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT TIME. 

CDMPRES5ED PURE-SALT BRICK5. 
AND PATENT FEEDERS. 

No wdste. no neglect d II convenience. 
Your dealer his it. Write us for the book. 

6ELM0NT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

Broohlyn, n.y. 



:Important as 
Ithe Gun Itself 

is "3 in One" for oiling a 
the delicate parts. Makes i 
trigger, lock, every action part workl 

■ promptly, properly. Never hardens J 
|or gums, contains no acid. I 

"3 in One" removes the residue of \ 
Iburnt powder. 1 nd i spensi blc with 

■ smokeless powder. Positively prevents! 
Ibarrcl from rusting insideorout. Cleans 1 
land polishes the stock. 
II,' ,-. . sample bottle sent on request. 
\ rrGe G. W. eo/e Company 128 
IWashington Life lildg, New York, N. Y ' 



w m 



CAPSULES 



Co 



New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Racetrack 



Six or more races each week day, rain 
or shine. 



Opening' Saturday, November 17. 

Races commence at 1 :40 P. M., sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12 o'clock, thereafter 
every twenty minutes until 1:40 P. M. 
No smoking in last two cars, which are 
reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after 
fifth and last races. 



THOS. H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



MARE WANTED. 

By McKinney, Zombro, Kinney Lou, 
Greco, Searchlight or Nutwood Wilkes, 
hot to exceed seven years old, brown, 
bay or black; sound, good size and 
handsome; trotter with or without rec- 
ord; standard and registered. Answer 
giving full particulars and lowest cash 
price. 

F. W. KELLEY, 
Breeder and Sportsman, 616 Golden 
Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

ALIX B., bay mare (record 2:24%) bv 
Nutwood Wilkes (2:16%) and out of 
Alberta (by Albert W. 2:20). 

CARLTON W. GREENE, 
873 Eddy Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION FOR 
SALE. 

I have six thoroughbred stallions for 
sale at prices to suit purchasers of 
limited means. No breeder of harness 
horses can afford to go without a thor- 
oughbred horse on his farm for a brood- 
mare sire for getting fine mares for 
dams of high class roadsters. Address 
CAFT. T. B. MERRY. 

549 Grand Ave, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

The well known stallion Milbrae 
2:16% and his two brothers, Portola 
and Menlo Boy. Milbrae is a handsome 
seal brown, 16 hands high and weighs 
1,190 lbs., a horse of excellent disposi- 
tion, splendid conformation and pos- 
sessed of great power and beauty. Mil- 
brae is sired by Prince Airlie, he by 
Guy Wilkes 2:15%, great grand sire 
Geo. Wiles 2:22, first dam Fearless by 
Fallis 2 23, second dam Jean Perault 
by-Signal. For further information ap- 
ply to P. H. McEvoy, Menlo Park, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 



Bay mare Etta. B., sire Castella, dam 
Daisy (dam of Walter P. 2:24%). Cas- 
tella has two colts, both show lots of 
speed, but neither lias been trained. She 
is a fine saddle mare. Can single-foot 
very fast; weighs !>00 pounds. Price $75. 
For further particulars address HOW- 
ARD KERR, 623 J Street, Sacramento, 
California. 

FOR SALE. 

Effie Madison, 10 hands high, sound, 
can trot miles in 2:40, has good action, 
seven years old, a high-class mart. 
Sired by James Madison, first dam 
Lady W. hy Ophir. 

Also her two-year-old bay filly by 
Stam B., large sized filly and a good 
prospect. Entered and paid up on in 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes No. 
5, $7,000 guaranteed. Address Wm. E. 
DETELS, Pleasanton, Cal. 

WANTED — TO LEASE. 

A well bred McKinney stallion. Fifty 
per cent of net earnings to the owner. 
First class care taken of horse; can 
give best of references. Good field for 
well bred stallion. Address 
M. E. LEWIS, 
136 4th St., Eureka, Cal. 



FOR SALE 

DICTATRESS 2:08 



Handsome chestnut mare by Dictatus, 
dam Salinas Bell by Vermont. Sound 
in every respect; standard and register- 
ed; In foal to Hal B. 2:04%. Will be 
sold for the cheap price of $f500 if 
taken at once. Address 

AUGUST ERICKSON, 

Portland, Oregon. 



FOR SALE. 

Handsome sorrel gelding, eight years 
old, weighs 1050 pounds, 15% hands 
high, a trotter broken to saddle. Hand- 
some head and neck, stylish, absolutely 
sound and gentle. A rare opportunity 
to get a first-class driving horse and 
saddle horse combined. Will be sold at 
a reasonable price. Address W. S. 
CLARK, Concord, Cal. 

PASTURAGE. 

Fine pasturage; no wire fencing; 
good box stalls, and best of care given 
horses in any manner that owners may 
desire at reasonable rates. For further 
particulars address 

MRS. CHASE, 

Sonoma, Cal. 

IMPORTED HACKNEY STALLIONS 

At one-half other people's prices. If 
you want bargains write at once to 
R. P. STERICKER, West Orange, N. J. 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co.. San 
Mateo. 

CONCORD RACE TRACK 

Concord, Contra Costa County, Cal. 

Having leased the above track we 
have made arrangements to break and 
develop trotters and pacers. We have 86 
box stalls and will guarantee to keep 
this track In perfect order. The climate 
is unsurpassed. Owners and trainers are 
cordially invited to visit this course. 
As a winter track Concord is second to 
no other in California. Terms very rea- 
sonable. F. M. HAMMETT and J. E. 
FOSTER, Lessees. 

J. R. Wilson. A. F. Rooker 

WILSON & ROOKER 

Livery, Board and Feed Stable 

All kinds of team work on short no- 
tice. Contractors for Grading and Ex- 
cavating. 410 Franklin St., cor. Grove. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Fred Mast Successor to Zibbell & Son 

THE AVENUE STABLE. 
672-680 11th Ave., one block north of 
Chutes. 

A nice line of New Livery; Large, 
Clean Box Stalls. Special attention paid 
to boarding high-class horses. Work 
horses for any business for hire at all 
times. All kinds of country horses for 
sale. 

RUBBEROID ROOFING 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON & CO., 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

PETER SAXE & SON, 513 32d street. 
Oakland, Cal., Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers for past thirty years. All varie- 
ties Cattle. Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence so- 
licited. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DUR- 
HAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs, 
I'miltry. Established 1876. Wm. Niles 
& Co.. I.os Angeles, Cal. 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY 

High Class Art 
— in — 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers in PAPER. 

No. 403 Twelfth St., Oakland 
Rlake. McFall & Co.. Portland, Oregon. 
Blake. Mofnt & Towne, Los Angeles. 



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Write for "The Story of a Book"— Free. 
Q. & C. MERRIAM CO., Springfield, Mass. 
(.1.1 THE BEST. 



14 



THE B REEDER AND S PORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 26, 1907. 



GREAT DISPERSAL SALE 



All the Horses Owned by the 

Estate of James Coffin, Deceased 

To Be Held 
Monday Evening, February 25, 1907 
At 7:45 O'clock 

At the New Pavilion of 

Fred H. Chase & Co. 



478 Valencia St. 



San Francisco 



This consignment is headed by the 
young Palo Alto bred stallion 

CASSIAN 2:Z9Vz 
Son of Mendocino 2:1 9% by Electioneer 
and Cressida 2:18%. by Palo Alto 2:08%. 

25 head in all, which were selected 
with great care by Mr. Coffin to establish 
a breeding farm. 

Horses will be at Sale Stables, SAT- 
URDAY. FEBRUARY 23d. 

"Write for Catalog-lies. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 
478 Valencia St. San Francisco, Cal. 



A FEW OF THE GOOD ONES. 

Grace Kaiser, dam of Coney 2:02, Stipu- 
lator 2:11%, McZeus 2:13, Grace McK. 
2:21% and grandam of Tidal Wave 
2:09. Stinted to Highland C. 

Carrie Malone, own sister to Chj.s. Derby 
2:20 and dam of Carrie B. 2:18, and 
Cassiar 2:22, and grandam of Pinkey 
H. 2:17%. In foal to Bon Voyage. 

Welladay 2:14, own sister to ('lias. Derby 
and in foal to Bon Voyage (3) 2:12%. 

Admiral Togo (2) 2:29»4. One of the 
best prospects for a 2:08 trotter in 
America. Worked a mile in 2:15% 
last year. Five years old, sound, level 
headed and a sure race horse. The 
talk of the track at Pleasanton. 

Grandly Bred Mares by McKinney, Zom- 
bro. Zolock, Cupid, Mendocino, Oro 
Wilkes and Secretary, in foal to high 
class stallions and their produce en- 
tered in rich stakes. 

Colts and Fillies by Kinney Lou, Stam 
B., Lynwood W., Cassian. Zombro, Zo- 
lock, and Lecco. Among these are 
the great two-year-old fillies Grace 
Zolock by Zolock 2:05 out of Grace 
Kaiser, noted above, and Rose Lecco 
by Lecco 2:09% out of Rose McKinney, 
dam of Almaden (2) 2:22%, winner 
of Breeders' Futuritv and Occident 
Stakes. 



Auction Sale of 50 Head of Horses 

Monday Evening at 7:45 



February 11, 1907 



At the most extensive market in the West and in the largest Sale Building in 
the city, with a Speedway where every horse can show what he can do. 

THE BEST COLLECTION OF ALL PURPOSE HORSES EVEB OFFERED AT 
AUCTION. Stallions, Broodmares and Business Horses; Record Horses, including 
Queenie B. 2:12 1 .i, Lottie Farks 2:1634, Venus Derby 2:23 (been a mile in 2:1G 1 2 ). 
Frincess W. 2:29 '4, the best 2:15 class trotter ever passed under the hammer. 

Some sensational green speed that can step to the front going through the 
Park. The superb consignment from the Baywood Stud, San Mateo, of ranch-breil 
horses from Llano Seco Rancho, Butte Co., Cal., have been prepared for this sale 
at the Baywood Stud and are the best lot ever bred at this well known farm, com- 
prising Combination Horses, Fark Teams, Single Horses and Business Fairs, all 
well broken and fit for present conditions. 

GET A CATALOGUE AT ONCE. 

Fred H. Chase & Co., 478 Valencia St. 



Near Sixteenth Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



WRITE TO=DAY FOR CATALOGUE. 



CAMPBELL'S IODOFORM 



GALL REMEDY 



For GALL HACKS and SHOULDERS. 
CRUPPER SORES and SALDLE GALLS 
there is none superior. 

The horse CAN BE UORKED AS 
USUAL. 

For PARBEt) WIRE CUTS, CALKS, 
SCRATCHES, Blood Poisoned SORES, 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN it has no 
equal. 

Its use will absolutely prevent Blood 
Poisoning. We placed it on the market 
relying wholly on its merit for success. 
The sales of 190G were 100 per cent 
greater than the aggregate sales of 
Gall Remedy preceding that year. This 
increase was entirely due to its MERITS, 
and it is THE GALL REMEDY" OF THE 
20th CENTURY. 

It is quick anil sure for those trouble- 
some skin cracks under the fetlock 
which injure and often lay up race 
horses. 

Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1219. 

All Trainers Should Keep It in Their Stables 

FBICE — 25c, 50c and $1.00. 

(Read our ad. on Campbell 's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper) 
Jas. B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 




Sold by all dealers in Harness and Turf Goods 
write any Jobber for it. 



If not in stock ask them to 




TALLION OWNER 



If In need of anything in the line of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printi'il. Tabulated lvdinn-es. Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks, 
stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts in stock and made from phot ox, 
Hunt Pads of all kinds for road or track. Breeding Hobbles, Stallion 
Support x. I'regnators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : : 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn SI, CHICAGO. 



CRABBET ARABIAN STUD 



CRABBET FARK, THREE BRIDGES 
and NEW BUILDINGS, SOUTH WATER. 
SUSSEX, ENGLAND. 

The largest breeding stud of Arabian 
horses in the world. The conditions 
under which these horses are bred at 
Newbuildings produce a type unrivaleed 
for quality and hardiness. The unique 
knowledge of the breed gained by the 
owners in Arabia enables them to guar- 



antee purity of blood of the choicest 
strains, some of which are now extinct 
in the East. Stallions and mares con- 
stantly supplied to breeders throughout 
the Colonies and on the Continent. A 
few mares suitable for polo, hacks and 
quiet in harness generally for sale. 
For further particulars address GUY 
CARLETON, Manager, Carpenters, 
Southwater, Sussex, England. 



Chicago Horseman Newspaper Co. 

Announces the Renewal of 

The Horseman Futurity 

A GUARANTEED STAKE OF 

$15,000.00 

For Foals of 1907 — To Race as 3= Year-Olds in 1910 



$1 1 ,000 for 3=year=old TROTTERS $4,000 for 3=year=old PACERS 

Entries Close March 2, 1907 

Richest of all Newspaper Futurities. Most Liberal 
System of Entrance. 

CONDITIONS. 

Entries close Saturday, March 2, 1907, when first payment of $5.00 shall be 
made, and name, color and full pedigree of mare and name of stallion to which she 
was bred must be given. This payment includes a year's subscription to The 
Horseman and Spirit of the Times, which will be sent to any address furnished 
by the nominator. 

Second Payment — November 2. 1907 — $10, when color and sex of foal must be 
given. If a nominated mare has no living foal on this date her owner may sub- 
stitute another mare and foal regardless of ownership. 

NO FURTHER PAYMENTS UNTIL YEAR OF RACE. 

Third payment — March 1, 1910 — $50 in Trotting Division; $25 in Pacing 
Division. Name and Gait of foal must be given with this payment. 

Last Payment — July 1, 1910 — $150 in Trotting Division; $50 in Pacing Division. 

Failure to make payments when due shall constitute a withdrawal and for- 
feiture of previous payments. 

The Stake will be raced during August or September, 1910, exact date and 
track to be announced not later than June 1st of that year, and will be governed 
by the trotting and pacing rules governing the track selected except where other- 
wise provided herein. 

Each race will consist of three heats of one mile each. 

In case of a tie for first place between two or more horses at the end of 
the third heat, the horses so tied shall race off the tie. 

A distanced horse shall be entitled to money already won. 

All entrance received in excess of the guaranteed value of this Stake shall be 
divided equally between the trotting and pacing divisions, and the added money In 
each division shall be awarded 70, 20 and 10 per cent, respectively, to the first three 
horses in the summaries. 

The Stake will be divided as follows: 

TROTTING DIVISION. 

For each heat, $2,500 to first horse; $600 to second $300 to third, and a sterling- 
silver cup of not less than $500 in value, to be known as THE HORSEMAN AND 
SPIRIT OF THE TIMES FUTURITY CUP, for the horse standing best in the 
summary at the end of the race; and $300 to the nominator of the dam. 

FACING DIVISION. 

For each heat, $750 to first horse; $350 to second; $150 to third; $150 to the 
horse standing best in the summary at the end of the race, and $100 to the nomi- 
nator of the dam. 

Anyone sending a club of five annual subscriptions to The Horseman and Spirit 
of the Times at $3 each, or ten semi-annual subscriptions at $1.50 each, or enough 
of both to amount to $15, the order accompanied by cash, shall be entitled to one 
nomination and an additional nomination for each additional club. 
All Money Faid in Goes to the Stake. The Last Horseman Futurity Amouted to 

$20,000.00— TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS— $20,000.00 

The Amount Guaranteed was but $12,500.00 

ENTRIES CLOSE SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 1907. 

BLANKS. 



WRITE NOW FOR ENTRY 



Chicago Horseman Newspaper Company 



DANIEL J. CAMFAU. President 



357 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO. 



PAYMENT ON TWO-YEAR-OLDS 



—IN THE — 



Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 

$7,000 GUARANTEED 
For foals Born 1905 

Races to Take Place 1907 and 1908 

$10 on Each Entry Due February 1st, 1907 

AND MUST BE MADE NOT LATER THAN THAT DATE. 

$4250 for Trotting Foals. $1750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nomi- 
nators of Dams of Winners and $200 for Owners of Stallions 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$3000 
200 



1250 
200 



For Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Three-Year-Old Trot. 

For Two-Year-Old Trotters. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Two-Year-Old Trot. 

To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of three-year-old Trot 
when mare was bred. ' 



Siooo 

200 



750 
200 



For Three-Year-Old Facers. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Three-Year-Old Pace. 

For Two-Year-Old Pacers. 

For Nominator of Dam of Win- 
ner of Two-Year-Old Face. 

To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of three-year-old Pace 
when mare was bred. 



ENTRANCE and PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on October 15, 1904, when name, 
color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given. $5 February 1, 
1905. $5 September 1, 1905. $10 on yearlings February 1, 190G. $10 on two- 
year-olds February 1, 1907. $10 on three-year-olds February 1. 1908 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $25 to start in the two-year-old pace. $35 to start in the 
three-vear-old trot. $35 to start in the three-year-old pace. $50 to start in the 
three-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first 
day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators Must Designate When Making Payments to Start Whether the Horse 

Entered is a Trotter or Facer. 
Colts That Start at Two Years Old Are Not Barred From Starting Again In the 
Three-Year-Old Division 
Make all payments and address communications to the Secretary. 
E. P. HEALD, President. F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

616 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco. 



Saturday, January 26, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



THE 

NEW 



DU PONT SMOKELESS 



Is the choice of the American sportsman. 

Its reliability has won the confidence of trap shooters all over the 
country who use it exclusively in their shells. 



It Has "Won More 



High Averages Than A " ° ther 



Powders Combined. 

Have all your shells loaded with new Du Pont Smokeless. 



E. I. du Pont de Nemours Powder Company 

Wilmington, Del. 



ITHACA GUNS 



THIS illustration shows our No. 7 $300 list gun. It is impossible to 
show by a cut the beautiful finish, workmanship and material of this 
grade of gun, it can only be appreciated after you have handled 
^ m and examined the gun for yourself. It is fitted with the best Dam- 
ascus or Whitworth Fluid Steel barrels, the finest figured Walnut stock 
that Nature can produce, is hand checkered and engraved in the most 
elaborate manner with dogs and birds inlaid in gold. Send for Art Cata- 
log describing our complete line, 17 grades, ranging in price from $17.75 
net to $300 list. 



Ithaca Gun Company - - Ithaca, N. 

Pacific Coast Branch, 1346 Park St., Alameda, Cal. 



Y. 



GUNS 



FRESH AMMUNITION 




Outing and Rubber Footwear. Good for Wet Weather and Down Town. 

Palace Hardware, 638 Market Street 

Main Store and Office, 458 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 

Ross McMahon Awni Kt nd co. 

AT THE OLD STAND 

Teamsters' Rain Goods, Bags, Tents, Awnings, Hammocks, Covers 
73 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



j GOLCHER BROS. 



Formerly of Clabrough, Oolcher & Co. 



Guns, Fishing Tackle 
Ammunition 
Sporting Goods 

51 1 Market St., San Francisco i 




Telephone 
Temporary 1883 

^A AAAAAAA A AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA^ 



Three Lewd Horsef 

are not curiosities by any means. The country is full of them. The, 
fourth lee is there all riu'ht but it is not worth anything because of a curb, 
splint spavin or other like bunch. You can cure the horse of any of these 
iulinents and put another sound leg under him by the use of 



it if t ■ 



usln 



caus 



Qu inn's Ointment. 



.. .od and reliable. When a. horse la cured 
nn'soiiitnient he stars cured. Mr. K. F.llurko 
irinirlleld, Mo., writes as follows: "1 have heen 
Qulnn'a Ointment mi-several yearn anil have of- 
eted man V marvelous c ures; It. will nn deeper and" 
s pain than any blister I ever used. Thought 
it mv duty for the bene'fltot' horses t" recommend your 
Ointment. 1 am never without It " Thl« Is the general 
verdict bv all w h" If I ve Qulnn'a Olntmunt a trial, h or 
curbs, splints, spavins. windpiiiTs. and all bunches It 
Unnranalad. PricoSi par bant* at "it drngnata 
jr sent by mall. Send for circulars, testimonials, .V.C. 

W. B. Eddy A Co., Whitehall. N. Y. 



Pointers and 

English Setters 

Trained and Broken 

Broken Dogs and Well Bred Puppies 
for sal--. Address E. VALENCIA 

212 North Brown St., Napa, Cal. 

FOB SALE — BOSTON TERRIERS. 

A few typical specimens; dark brlndlc; 
full pedigree. E. D. mendenhall, 
41 Clay St., San Francisco. 



FOB SALE. 

tri color collie pups from 

working stock. Sire Shadeland Bandom, 
Sir Jan. A. K. C. 100.81)6 (son of Imp. 
Inverness Prince). BANDOM COLLIE 
KENNELS, E. C. Band, Prop., B. F. D. 
No. 2, Box 116, Santa Bosa, Cal. 

BULL TBBBIBBS. — Pure white, high 
class puppies for sale, sired by Wood- 
lawn Baron, a classy Individual and 
show winner, brother to the winner of 
first and specials at I3ull Terrier Breed- 
ers' Show at Philadelphia (at which tin- 
best in the world were shown). STIL- 
ETTO KENNELS, 225 Alcatraz Avenue. 
Berkeley, Cal. 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 26, 1907. 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 



•i* *J* 'l* •!* 'I* 



* 
+ 




Reming ton. 



lide to Work 



AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 



with the left hand. Right hand pulls trigger. Recoil ejects, 
cocks and reloads. Solid breech protection against "blow- 
hacks." Safety just before the trigger finger prevents acci- 
dental discharge. Full line of Double Guns If you prefer. 
The Ideal Duck Gun — List Price, $40 and upwards. 
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY. 
Sales Office, San Francisco, Cal. Factory, Iliou. IT. "X. 

Agency, 315 Broadway, New York City. 



WINCHESTER 

Model 1907 Self-Loading Rifle. .351 Caliber High Power. 




Standard Rifle, 20-inch round nickel steel barrel, pistol grip, stock of plain walnut, not checked, weight about 7% pounds, number of shots, six, LIST Price, $28.00 

This new rifle, which has the thoroughly tried and satisfactory Winchester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge powerful enough for the largest game. The 
soft point bullet mushrooms splendidly on animal tissue, tearing a wide, killing path. With a metal patched bullet this rifle will shoot through a >4-inch steel 
plate. The Model 1907 is a six-shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and simple and strong in construction. It is a serviceable, handy gun from 
butt to muzzle. There are no moving projections on the outside of the gun to catch in the clothing or tear the hands, and no screws or pins to shake loose. It is 
easily loaded and unloaded; easily shot with great rapidity and easily taken down and cleaned. List price, $28.00. The retail price is lower. Ask your dealer to 
show you this gun. Send for circular fully describing this rifle. 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. 




"The Gun That Shoots Through Steel" 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Smith Hammerless and Ejector Guns 



Also Hunter One Trigger 




Won This Year's Grand 

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268 Competitors 

Also Won Grand Eastern 
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(Hunter One Trigger) 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



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2 



THE BR EEDER AND SPOR T S M A N 



[ Saturday. February 2. 1907. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 year old Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 year old Stallion of 1950 

Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Record . . . .2:12% 
Timed in a Race 2:10% 

WINNER OP HARTFORD FUTURITY ($8500) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% is by Expedition 2:15% (sire of Biflora 2:09%, Ex- 
ton 2:10%. and 50 others in 2:30 list), son of Electioneer 125 and Lady Russell 
• sister to Maud S. 2:08% and dam of 5 in 2:30 list), by Harold 113. The dam of 
Bon Voyage is Bon Mot (dam of Bon Voyage 2:12-Y,, Endow 2:14% and Bequeath 
2:20%), by Erin 2:24%; second dam Farce 2:29%. by Princeps 536: third dam 
Roma (dam of Farce 2:29%, Romance 2:29%, and Guyon 2:27%). by Golddust 50; 
fourth dam Bruna (dam of Woodford Pilot 2:22%), by Pilot Jr. 12. 

Season of 1907 at PLEAS ANTON RACE TRACK. 
Sifl for trip <Menn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded 
* ou l,,c pWMWU should mare not prove in foal. A rare chance to breed 

good mares to an exceptionally high-class and highly bred young stallion. 

2:19 TRIAL 2:12 

(At Four Years Old) 

Bred at Highland Farm, Dubuque, Iowa 

By EXPRESSO 29199 (half brother to Expressive (3) 2:12%) by Advertiser 
2:15%, son of Electioneer 125; dam ALPHA 2:23% (dam of Aegon 2:18%. sire of 
Ageon Star 2:11 Vi. etc.) by Alcantara by George Wilkes 2:22; second dam Jessie 
Pepper (dam of 2 in list and 3 producing sons and 7 producing daughters) by Mam- 
brino Chief 11, etc. 

Terms, $25 For the Season 

HIGHLAND is a grand looking young stallion, eight years old. His breeding 
Is most fashionable and his immediate ancestors are producers of race winners with 
fast records. He is beautifully gaited and has a perfect disposition. Does not 
pull or want to break at speed, and can be placed at will in a bunch of horses. He 
is a high-class horse and has better than 2:10 speed, and lias trotted a quarter in 
31 seconds over the Pleasanton race track. 

H K5 1ILANI i is ;i coal black horse with one while hind ankle, stands 16.1 hands 
high and weighs close to 1200 pounds. 

The above Stallions, owned by W. A. Clark Jr., will make a public season. Both 
are entered in the Horse World Stallion Representative Stake for three-year-olds, 
and all their foals will be eligible to this rich event, with nothing to pay until the 
year of the race. 

Address all communications to 

J. O. Gerrety, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Highland C. 



By J. J. Audubon 
IG6Q5, sire of Au- 
dubon Boy 1:59', 
Nan Audubon 2:08', 
Miss Rita 2:08^ 



Audubon Boy 1:59 

DAM, FLAXY (dam of Audubon Boy 1:59%. Royal R. Sheldon 2:04%, Red Elm 
2:16% and grandam of Simon Kenton 2:13% and Mary Louise 2:27%), by Bourbon 
Wilkes 2345 (sire of Ooastman 2:0S%, Split Silk 2:08%, Sunland Belle 2:08%, etc.). 
he by George Wilkes 2:22, out of Favorite 2:35% (dam of 1 and five sires of 135 
In 2:30), by Abdallah 15. Flaxy's dam was Kit. by Clark Chief 89 (sire of 6 and 
dame of 35); second dam Nelly by Grey Denmark. J. J. Audubon 16695 was by 
Alcyone 2:27, out of Dolly Pomeroy (dam of Miss Pomeroy 2:22% and J. J. Audu- 
bon 1:59%), by Highland Grey 2:28 (sire of 8, including Highland L. 2:14%); 
second dam. Nelly 

First and only horse whose entire racing career (56 heats) averages 2:0S' 4 . 

First and only horse at 5 years to pace twice in one day in 2:03%, winning race. 

First and only horse to pace in 2:00'- ■,, first trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59'.,, second trial against time. 

First and only hcrse tc pace to the half in 57 % seconds. 

First and only horse to pace to the three-quarter in 1:27%. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59%, first trial second year.- 

First and only horse to pace again in 2:00, same week, same year. 

First and only horse to pace twice in 2:00 in one week. 

All of the above without the aid cf wind or dust shield and all under unfavor- 
able conditions, the most unfavorable of all being when he paced in 1:59%. 

WILL STAND AT AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, TO 
A FEW GOOD MARES. 



TERMS — $100 for the Season. 
I may choose. 



S150, with return privilege or money refunded as 

For further particulars address 
J. Y. GATCOMB, 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 



THE STANDARD BRED STALLION 



Two-year-old record, 2:15%. 
By Diablo 2:08%, Biro of 
Six in 2:10 list. 



/UcFadyen 2:15} 

Dam, Bee (dam of McFadyen (2) 2:15%, Friskarina (3) 2:13%. and Monroe B. 
2:15%), by Sterling 6223 (son of Egmont, dam Mary by Flaxtail); second dam Flash 
(dam of Javelin 2:08%, Flare Up 2:14, Sally Derby 2:17%, Walker 2:23%. etc.), by 
Egmont; third dam Liglitfoot by Flaxtail 8132. 

Will make the Season of 1907 at my ranch at Dixon, Cal. 

Excellent pasturage at $2.50 per month and the best of care taken of mares. 
TERMS — $40 for the Season. E. D. DUDLEY, Dixon, Cal. 



Mendocino 22607 

RECORD (THREE-Y^AR-OLD) 2:19% 

Sire of Monte Carlo 2:07% (to wagon 2:08%); Mendolita 2:07%. Idollta (2 y. o.) 
2:21%, (3 y. o. > l':12, <ai 2:0'.",; Leonora 2:12%. Polka Dot 2:11%. etc. Bay stallion, 
15.3% hands; weight 1190 pounds; hind feet and ankles white; foaled April 24, 
1889. Bred at Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Sire. ELECTIONEER 1«5, sen ..f I lamhletoniiin 1". First dam. MANO (dam 
of Mendocino (3) 2:19%, Electant 2:19%, Morocco (3 y. o. trial 2:22), by Piedmont 
:t04, '2:17%; second dam, Mamie (dam of Mamie W. (3) 2:17%. Hyperion 2:21%, 
Memjento 2:25%, Mithra (p) 2:14%), by Hambletonian Jr. 1882; third darn, Gilda 
^thoroughbred) by imp. Mango. 

MENDOCINO is one of Elect ioneer's youngest and best sons. With very limited 
opportunities in the stud he has proven his. worth by producing such racehorses as 
Monte Carlo and Idolita. Two new additions to his 2:30 list were made last season 
.mil he now lias twelve standard performers. His foals are good size, fine lookers, 
bold and pure gaited and easily developed. 

SERVICE FEE for Season of 1907. S75; usual ret.un privilege. 



By McKinney 2:11%; 
Dam Helena 3 SUM' 



/HcKena 39460 

Brown Stallion, 10.2 hands, weight 1350 pounds; foaled April 11, 1900. Bred 
at Palo Alto Stock Farm. Site, McXINNEY 8818 i record 2:11%). First dam. 
HELENA 2:11%> (dam of Wildnutling 2:11%, Dobbel 2:22. Hyila (trial 2:12), by 
Electioneer 125; second .ini La.l. Kllen (darn of six in list. Including Helena 

2:114*, Kllen Wood 2:14% ), by Mambrino 1789; third dam, Ida May Jr. by Owen 
Dale; fourth dam, Ida May by Belmont (Williamson's). 

McKENA has proven a remarkably sure foal getter. He should make a great 
sire as he is a line individual and bred right. His sire. McKinney, a game and fast 
racehorse and sire of game and fast racehorses. His dam, Helena, one of the fastest 
and gamest daughters of Electioneer, the greatest sire of trotters the world has yet 
known. His second dam, Lady Ellen, was one of the best of her day, and as well as 
Jier daughter Helena is a great broodmare. 

SERVICE F3E for Season of 1907, S40; usual return privilege. 



.Mi MDOCINO and McKENA will make the season at PALO ALIO STOCK 
FARM. Males may run on pasture at $7.50 per month. No responsibility assumed 
liv the Palo Alto Stock Farm for injury or escapes. Address all communications to 

PALO ALTO STOCK FARM, 

Stanford University, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



Redlac 2:07 



IS THE CHAMPION TROTTER 
Got by the Great Allerton 2:09] 



Reg. No. 40094 



He holds the World's Race Record Hi ™t^£™7V**ll°?» i 906 

Of this the Chicago Tribune of January 6, 1907, says: "This is a most re- 
markable feat and coupled with the fact that his first and second dams are mares 
far above the common in producing merit and that he himself is a grandly gaited 
trotter with a fast record and better than two-minute speed, he should certainly 
remain prominent. He is also said to hold the world's record for soundness over 
•all trotting stallions with records as fast as his." 

He is by Allerton 2:09%, sire of over 150. First dam is Grandma, dam of two 
by Muscovite 2:1S; second dam Lilly, dam of three by J. W. Tedford 2:19% by 
Ensign 2:28%; third dam Mary Ann, by Charley B. 2:40, he by Angle Horse, a 
grandson of Hambletonian 1"; fourth dam S. T. I'., thoroughbred. 

RKPLAC is a brown stallion, 15.3 hands high. He is a show horse in individ- 
uality and has perfect disposition and manners. 

A handsome stallion. A grand race horse, and destined to be a great sire. 

WILL MAKE SEASON OF 1907 AT AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, 
CAL. Mares cared for at reasonable rates and jogged if desired. 

Terms — $50 at Time of Service. 

Contract given with full return privilege or money returned at our option 
should mare prove not to be in foal. Will not be responsible for accidents or 

escapes. 

JUSTICE & GRUBB, 

C. J. Grubb, Manager, University Station, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Iran Alto Trot 



No. 24576 
Trotting Race Record 2:12 



Iran Alto is the only stallion with so fast a record and whose sire and dam 
both held world's records. He is sired by Palo Alto 2:08% (to high-wheeled sulky), 
by Electioneer. His dam is Elaine 2:20 (to high wheels), which was the three- 
year-old record of her day. She is the dam of 4 and grandam of 12 in the list. 
Next dam Green Mountain Maid, dam of Electioneer and of 9 in the list. Iran Alto 
is the sire of Dr. Frasse 2:11%, winner of the 2:12 trot at Lexington last October. 
His get are all large, handsome, high-class roadsters and race horses. 

Will Make the Season of 1907 in charge of 
TERMS — S30 for the Season. H. S. HOGOBOOM, Woodland, Cal. 

Usual return privileges. 



Mc Kinney's Fastest Entire Son 



Z0L0CK 



RECORD 2:05 U 
Reg. No. 34471 



Great Race Horse and Producing Sire. 



Sire of 
Bystander . . 
Delilah 4) 
Sherlock Holmes 
Charlie T. 
R. Ambush 3 
Zolahka 

Ingarita . . . . 
Dixie S. 
Dixie W. 



2:08 
2:09 + 
2:11 '4 

■ 2:13 % 
2:1 44 
2:23' 
2:25 1 ■ 
2:27 

2:27 



Tne following trial miles have been 
shown during the last year: Bystander 
2:05%, Delilah 2:05%, R. Ambush 2:10%, 
Hon ton de Oro 2:11. Glory 2:11%. Cleo- 
patra 2:12. Kinnev Wood 2:12, Zollie 
2:13, Lillian Zolock 2:14, Conchlta 2:17. 
Red Lock 2:18, Angeline 2:18. AcUlante 
2:18. Zolocka 2:20, Inaugretta 2:22. 
Mc O. D. 2:22. Hylock 2:25. Majella2:25. 
MeNeer 2:25, Denitha 2:25, Bolock 2:27. 
Bonnie June 2:27. Izalco 2:30. and a 
number of others that have been miles 
better than 2:30. His get are all young 
and with one exception. Bystander, none 
of those that were trained are over four 
vears old. 



Zolock's Sire is the Great McKinney 2:11 4 
Zolock's Dam is the Great Brood Mare Gazelle 2:1 1 ' 4 

( B\ < lossiper 2 II-,. dam of /.« >L( .< K 2:05 1 , . Zephyr 2 :07 ' , : second dam the great 
broodmare Gipsev (bv Gen. Booth 2:30%). dam of Gazelle 2:11%. Delilah (3) 2:14%. 
Ed. Winship 2:15. Willets (mat.) 2:17. Dixie S. 2:27. and grandam of Col. Green 
(trial) 2:10%; third dam Echo Belle (grandam of Conn 2:15%). by Echo 462; fourth 
dam bv Lummox, and fifth dam by Grey Eagle. 

ZOLOCK stands 16 bands, weighs nearly 1 200 pounds, is a beautiful brown 
and a horse of grand proportions. All bis colts are good headed, and there has 
never been one that went lame. 

Will Make the Season of 1907 at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 
TERMS FOR THE SEASON, $75 

Season starts February 1st. Mares will be cared for in any manner desired, 
but no responsibility for "accidents or escapes. For further particulars call or 
address 

HENRY DELANEY. 

University Station, Los Angeles, Cal. 



A Good One for Sale 




Daedalion 

2M\ 



SIRED BY BIABX.O 2.09%, sire of Sir Albert S. L':»3 : ' 4 . Clipper 2:0(i. Dlabltto 
2-08)1, Daedalion 2:"Sy,. Tom Carneal 2:08%. John R. Conway 2:09, and 28 others 
in ":30. Daedaiion's dam was the great brood mare Grace (dam of Creole 2:15. 
sire of Javelin 2:08% and Eagle 2:19%, and grandam of Sir Albert S. 2:03%), by 
Bucaneer 2656. 

He is 15.2 hands high, a beautiful seal brown, weighs 1100 pounds; unexcelled 
in all the points one would expect in a horse to be used as a campaigner, road 
horse or sire. His disposition is absolutely perfect. Sound as a new dollar. He 
lias never shown a lame step since I bought him and is always ready to do his 
best. He needs neither hopples or straps; has been separately timed miles In 2:04. 

In a letter from the well known trainer. James Thompson, dated Pleasanton, 
January 20th, he savs: "I am satisfied your horse Daedalion will prove a good 
sire. A year ago Mr. James Sutherland broke a colt at two years old by him and 
after sixtv days' work breaking and all. I saw her trot in 2:36. There is also 
another colt owned by John Dougherty of Lodi that shows great speed on the road; 
both are trotters. The owners have arranged with me to handle the colts and will 
be shipped to me next week. There is also one owned in Sacramento, a three-year- 
old, that trotted in 2:28 after a few weeks track work. From his breeding, con- 
formation, intelligence and grand speed. I have every reason to believe. If given 
a chance in the stud, he will prove, as I said before, a great sire. He is looking 
fine." 

Daedalion is in James Thompson's care at the Pleasanton race track, and can 
be seen at any time. For price and any further information address 

A. OTTINGER, Owner. J. C: Kirkpatrick, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Saturday, February 2, 1907.] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

Breeder and Sportsman 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLBY, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 
OFFICE: 616 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, 
SAN FRANCISCO 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postoffice. 



Terms— One Year $3; Six Months $1.75: Three Months $1 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED. 



AUDUBON BOY 1:59%. .J. Y. Gatcomb, Los Angeles 
AXWORTHY (3) 2:15% 

Empire City Farm, Cuba, N. Y. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% 

J. O. Gerrety, Mgr., Pleasanton, Cal. 

HIGHLAND C. 2:19%. 

J. O. Gerrety, Mgr., Pleasanton, Cal. 

IRAN ALTO 2:12%. .H. S. Hogoboom, Woodland, Cal. 

McFADYEN (2) 2:15% E. D. Dudley, Dixon, Cal. 

McKENA 39460 

Palo Alto Stock Farm, Stanford University, Cal. 
McKINNEY 2:11% 

Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

MENDOCINO (3) 2:19%' 

Palo Alto Stock Farm, Stanford University, Cal. 

REDLAC 2:07%- C. J. Grubb, Los Angeles, Cal. 

ZOLOCK 2:05%.. Henry Delaney, Los Angeles, Cal. 



A SENSATIONAL PROGRAM is the one which 
Mr. Harry Stover of Petaluma places before the har- 
ness horse owners and trainers in this issue of the 
Breeder and Sportsman. Mr. Stover proposes to 
hold the Sonoma County Fair at his grounds, known 
as Kenilworth Park, in that thriving city, and in 
addition to giving very large premiums for all kinds 
of live stock, offers $17,500 for six harness races, 
several of the stakes being worth $2,000 each, and 
none less than $1,500. Mr. Stover says he, with the 
aid of the people of Sonoma county, who have al- 
ready subscribed $5,000 and will raise a great deal 
more, will give a Fair that will, in the lines followed, 
not be second to any — not even the State Fair. He 
proposes to give larger premiums for the best of 
every kind of live stock than have ever been given 
in the State. He has certainly started out most 
liberally with his stakes for trotters and pacers. 
The date he has selected is the last week in August, 
and will be the week directly following the breeders' 
big annual meeting at Santa Rosa, where at least 
$15,000 will be distributed among horsemen. Mr. 
Stover offers $2,000 for a free-for-all trot, and the 
same amount for a free-for-all pace. He has also 
offered $2,000 for a 2:12 class trot and $2,000 for a 
2:10 pace. All four of these races should fill with 
very large lists of entries. He offers $1,500 for three- 
year-olds, and the same amount for two-year-olds. 
Other classes are given so that all horses will be 
accommodated. Entries to these stakes will close 
March 3d, and by that time the programs of the 
Breeders' Association and the State Fair, besides 
Los Angeles and other places, will be ready. The 
Petaluma track has been the scene of many great 
races and many great crowds in the old days of 
the Sonoma and Marin County Fair, but Mr. Stover 
says he will have a crowd there this year that will 
dwarf the attendance at all former meetings. Excur- 
sions will be run from all points and everything 
done to accommodate the public and the horsemen. 
Turn to the advertisement and see the rich stakes 
which make up the program. 



THE CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT is assuming shape 
and is growing larger, while the purses and stakes 
that are to be offered begin to have a Grand Circuit 
appearance. Petaluma is first in the field with a six 
days' program of two races each each day where the 
stakes are either $1,500 or $2,000 for each race. The 
Breeders' Association will announce its program in 
a short time with stakes to range from $600 to 
$2,000, and the State Fair will do the same. Los 
Angeles will soon announce its purses and they will 
be very liberal, as the Harness Horse Association 
of that city always han.gs up good purses. Woodland 
will give purses of from $600 to- $1,000 with perhaps 
a stake or two larger, Pleasanton says its program 
will be as good, and there are other places where 
the money will be worth racing for. The San Joaquin 



Valley Circuit, comprising Fresno, Tulare, Hanford 
and Bakersfield, has organized and settled upon $30,- 
000 as the amount for harness races at the f out- 
meetings. Hollister, Salinas, Santa Maria, Vallejo, 
Ukiah, Dixon and other places will give good liberal 
purses also, and it is within reasonable limitation 
to predict that the amount of money to be hung up 
in California this year for harness horses to race 
for will amount to $150,000. We were certain the 
old spirit could be revived in this State is a start 
was made. The convention at Pleasanton not only 
showed that there are lots of owners who want to 
race in California this year, but it showed that the 
places desirious of giving them a chance are more 
numerous than most people imagined. 



JUST A WORD to the managers of the different 
tracks which will make up the California Circuit 
this year. You are not all expected to give as large 
purses as the principal tracks. The object in form- 
ing the California Circuit was to give all a chance 
to race and all to witness the sport. The more 
meetings we have the better for all concerned. 11' 
an association has decided that $300 purses is all 
it can afford to advertise, it should not be dis- 
couraged because some other association will give 
$1,000 or $2,000 purses. Go ahead with your pro- 
gram, get out your advertising early, show the 
horsemen that you mean business and will be glad 
to see them, and your entries will fill. There are a 
very large number of horses in training whose 
owners will be glad to race them for $300 purses. 
Chas. De Ryder, the famous reinsman, started the 
great trotter Charley Belden in a few $300 purses last 
year on half-mile tracks and says it did him good 
and got him in shape to win that $5,000 purse at 
Hamline. So we say to the smaller associations: 
Get out your programs early, give as much as you 
can afford to and advertise well and you will be 
pleased with results. 



THE PERSON who owns a good brodmare and 
fails to mate her this year with a good trotting bred 
stallion has not given much attention to the law of 
supply and demand. If he will Jook over the re- 
ports from the markets of this country and Europe 
he will see that there is a growing shortage in good 
trotting bred horses. It will take years for the sup- 
ply to anywhere near catch up with the demand, and 
the persons who have salable horses during the next 
six or seven years will get even better prices than 
can be obtained now. We are not giving this advice 
to men who own the cheap sort of mares, but those 
who own the good ones. Never breed a young mare 
that is not good enough for some other use. There 
are a few instances of a seemingly worthless mare 
producing a, good colt, but there are thousands more 
where they have failed to improve on themselves. 
Breed your good mares with trotting blood in their 
veins to good trotting bred stallions. And no mat- 
ter how fine a mare you own try to pick out a stal- 
lion that is even better than she. Breed up all the 
time and you will succeed. Try to have on your 
farm the sort that the market, demands and you will 
not find any trouble with the horse business. 



IN THE COLUMNS of the Breeder and Sports- 
man to-day the new American Association of Trot- 
ting Horse Breeders has placed an advertisement, 
and Secretary H. K. Devereux has a communication, 
both of which we commend to our readers for care- 
ful perusal. This new organization has been formed 
for the purpose of uniting the breeders of trotting 
horses that unity of action and purpose may accom- 
plish things "for the good of the order." It should 
be able to do much for horsemen, as the gentle- 
men who have organized it are among the leading 
and most substantial men in the business of trotting 
horse breeding. Every breeding industry except 
that of breeding trotters has a national organization 
with membership in all parts of the country, that 
when necessary can use its united influence in aid- 
ing good or preventing bad legislation pertaining 
to its affairs, and there is no reason why the trot- 
ting horse people should not do the same thing. We 
advise our subscribers to read the advertisement and 
Secretary Devereux's letter and then write to him 
and ask for further information. 



IT IS SAID that the State Fair track at Sacra- 
mento is the only track in the State where the 
trainers have not missed a workout this winter on 
account of the rain. The Sacramento track is per- 
fectly drained and is beyond all question the best 
laid out track on the Pacific Coast. 



THAT SAX JOAQUIN VALLEY CIRCUIT of 
fairs and race meetings is all rgiht, and as it will 
open right after the close of the State Pair, it will 
surely draw the crowd. Horsemen who intend rac- 
ing in California this year should remember this 
circuit when mapping out their line of march. 



READVILLE STAKES. 



Boston, January 26. — The New England Breeders* 
Association is the first of the associations In mem- 
bership with the Grand Circuit to announce its pro- 
gram of early closing events for its Grand Circuit 
meeting of 1907. At a meeting of the directors of 
the association held this morning the following pro- 
gram was arranged: 

The Blue Hill, 2:30 class, trotting. $4,500 divided; 
$1,050 to first, $300 to second, $150 to third: each 
race. 

The Massachusetts, 2:14 class, trotting, $9,000, 
divided; $2,100 to first, $600 to second, $300 to third; 
each race. 

The Ponkapoag, 2:10 class, trotting, $4,500 di- 
vided; $1,050 to first, $300 to second, $150 to third; 
each race. 

The Readville, 2:12 class, pacing, $3,000, divided; 
$700 to first, $200 to second, $100 to third; each 

race. 

The Norfolk, 2:08 class, pacing, $6,000 divided; 
$1,400 to first, $400 to second, $200 to third; each 
race. 

The Neponset, 2:06 class, pacing, $3,000 divided; 
$700 to first, $200 to second, $100 to third; each 
race. 

The every-heat-a-race plan, tried with such suc- 
cess last year, will govern all races this year, and 
the entrance fee will be but 5 per cent of the purse, 
with nothing deducted from winners. 

o ■ 

TO HORSEMEN GENERALLY. 

The American Association of Trotting Horse Breed- 
ers has been launched and is now undergoing the out- 
fitting process. 

It has been incorporated, and as soon as the con- 
stitution and by-laws with list of officers and direc- 
tors is printed, copies will be mailed and an active 
campaign for members will be begun. 

We may not be able to hold a breeders' meeting 
in 1907, although a few stakes may be given, but in 
another year things will be booming. 

Each member gets a share of stock, the cost of 
which is $5, with $2 yearly dues. Each member has 
a vote — and only one — so there will be no "close cor- 
poration" methods used. 

Life memberships are fixed at $50, and are exempt 
from dues. 

Every man who cares for a good horse is eligible 
to membership whether he owns one or not. 

We hope to have 50,000 members. If the people 
interested will support this organization the trotting 
horse interests should be benefitted materially. 
Yours very truly, , 

American Assn. of Trotting Horse Breeders. 

H. K. DEVEREUX, Secretary. 
322 Hickox Building, Cleveland. 0. 
o 

Rudy Kip's eighteen winning heats in nine Grand 
Circuit races last season averaged a shade slower 
than 2:06%, which is a faster average than any 
former winner has shown. Like many other rioted 
pacers of the turf. Rudy Kip wears the hobbles, yet 
he has repeatedly stepped miles around 2:07 with- 
out the pajamas. Such a good judge of pacers as 
Ed Geers litis always said that this stallion can be 
raced without them, and many other trainers have 
expressed the opinion that he is a coining two- 
minute pacer. Murphy bought him wearing the rig- 
gings, and as his intention was to go down the line 
aad win the purses, he did not care to train him 
without them. What the speed capacity of this stal- 
lion is could never be judged last season, for the 
reason that he went just as favt as was necessary 
to beat the leaders in his races. His breeding is 
one of the best, while individuality he has few 
equals. 

o 

The announcement of place where Kinney Lou 
2:07% will stand this season will he made in these 
columns next week. There has never been a stal- 
lion standing for service in California whose get 
show greater uniformity in color, style and confor- 
mation, and they are invariably fine lookers. Some 
of them will be in training this year as two-year- 
olds and the public will have a chance to see them 
step. 



i 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[ Saturday, February 2, 1907. 



■ t ' ■ > » ♦ ♦ i t # ♦ i t ♦ < 1 >t $ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ <i ■ > i t ><f >:••:••:••:••:•* 

I NOTES AND NEWS f 

.j. ...... ....j. ............... £ ...... ...... ... .............J,.........,;...,........,...... 

Gee whiz! 



Nothing less than $1500! 



How s that for a race program? 



For further particulars see ad of Petaluma meeting. 



Governor Gillett has -re-apointed Dr. Charles Keane 
to the office of State Veterinarian, and the appoint- 
ment is a good one. 



Starter Woods, who has officiated as starter of 
both harness and running races on the North Pacific 
Circuit for the past two or three years, has been 
engaged by Harry Stover to wield the starter's fla? 
at the big Sonoma county fair in August. 



It begins to look as if the purses and stakes for 
harness races to be given in California this year will 
aggregate $150,000. 



The San Joaquin Valley Circuit has been or- 
ganized with four fairs and race meetings to be 
held at Fresno, Hanford, Tulare and Bakersfield. 
Purses for harness races at these four meetingj 
will aggregate $30,000. Good enough. 



Portola and Menlo Roy, eight and seven years old 
respectively, both standard and registered, have been 
consigned to Fred H. Chase's Combination Sale at 
478 Valencia street, Monday, February 11th. They 
are full brothers. Portola stands 16 hands and 
weighs 1190 pounds and Menlo Boy is 16.1 and 
weighs 1200. They are by Prince Airlie (son of Guy 
Wilkes), out of a mare by Del Sur: second dam old 
Lady Signal by Signal. They are good, solid color, 
excellent individuals, and in good hands can make 
money in any country where mares are bred to trot- 
ting stallions. 



The death of Electrite 2:28% occurred recently 
in Texas, where he was owned by Colonel Exall of 
Lomo Alto Stock Farm. Electrite was bred at Palo 
Alto Stock Farm, California, and foaled in 1888. He 
was an own brother to Sphinx 2:20% and Egotist, 
both of whom died during the past year. His sire 
was Electioneer and his dam the great brobdmade 
Sprite, by Belmont 64, granddam Waterwitch In- 
Pilot Jr. He was the sire of sixty-five standard per- 
formers, but strange to say not one of these has 
a record of 2:10 or better, his fastest trotter being 
Porto Rico 2:11, and his fastest pacer, Emerin 
Electrite 2:121. 



Our friend William Morgan of Pasadena has pur- 
chased an automobile, and was probably driven to it 
by the way the papers continue to misstate the 
names of his horses. His mare Era by Zombro is 
generally called Eva, his good trotter Queer Knight 
is written about as Queen Night. Queen Knights 
and Queer Night, and now his stake entry, Tracy 
by Direcho, is credited to either Diablo or Directo. 



Every Pacific Coast breeder of trotters and pacers 
should not only patronize his home colt stakes, such 
as the Pacific Breeders' Futurity, Occident and Stan- 
ford Stakes, but he should always have his farm 
represented in some of the Eastern Futurities. When 
a good colt makes its appearance on the California 
training ' tracks, and the horsemen begin to talk 
about its great speed, its value will be greatly in- 
creased if it has one or two good Eastern engage- 
ments. The American Horse Breeders' Futurity, of 
which mention was recently made in these columns, 
is one of the most liberal stakes ever inaugurated. 
It has a guaranteed value of $10,000, of which $7000 
goes to three-year-old trotters ($5000 to winner f, 
$3000 to three-year-old pacers ($2000 to winner), ami 
$700 to nominators of dams of money winners. It 
only costs one dollar to nominate a mare in thk 
Futurity on March 1st, this year, $10 on November 
1st, when color and sex of foal must be given, and 
then there is nothing more to pay until the yea-- of 
the race. There has never been a more liberal stake 
offered, and we hope that California breeders will be 
well represented in it. 



Don't fail to go to Fred H. Chase's new pavilion 
a day or two before the sale of February 11th and 
inspect the consignment of horses sent up from the 
Haywood Stud at Sari' Mateo. These horses were 
bred at Llano Seco Rancho, In Butte county, and es- 
pecially fitted and prepared for this sale at Baywood 
Stud, where, as all Californians know, horses are 
educated and mannered — not "broke." These horses 
are all accustomed to steam and electric cars, auto- 
mobiles and other Infernal inventions, and range from 
four to six year's in age. They will come direct 
from the breeder's stables to this sale. There are 
In the" consignment carriage horses, pairs, surrev 
or buggy horses, single horses for business buggies 
and some light draft horses that are extra nice ones. 
Send to Fred H. Chase for a catalogue of this sale! 
If you want any kind of a horse weighing less than 
1500 pounds there will be something at this sale to 
suit you. 

o 

FILES CUr.ED I IT 6 TO 14 DAYS. 

PAZO OINTMENT is guaranteed to cure any case 
of Itching, Blind, Bleeding or Protruding Piles in 6 to 
1 4 days or money refunded. 50c. 



E. H. Cheney of Bodega, Sonoma county, ad- 
vertises for sale a fine Belgian-Norman four-year-old 
stallion, jet black with small white spots in forehead 
and no other white marks. This horse stands 17 
hands and weighs 1600 pounds; $1000 is the price 
asked. See advertisement. 



The Southern California Horse Show Association 
has secured the services of Richard S. Carmen of 
New York City as judge for the heavy harness classes 
in the coming horse show at Pasadena. Mr. Carmen 
is an acknowledged authority on such stock, and 
the members of the association feel very much 
pleased at their success in inducing him to act. 



They were saying a few weeks ago that the Grand 
Circuit would be curtailed this year, but it will be 
larger than last se;rson. as twelve tracks have al- 
ready applied for dates, beginning at Memphis, Oc- 
tober 19th. 



Nervolo 2:04% by Colbert 2:07% is standing for 
$25 the season at Manchester, New Hampshire. 



If every trainer who intends racing a string of 
horses in California will sit down and write to the 
different associations, stating what classes he wants, 
the work of the secretaries in making up race pro- 
grams will be much easier. 



Mr. J. M. Herbert of Denver, who recently pur- 
chased the Kinney Lou-Queen C. colt from Mr. 
Martin Carter, is also the owner of the McKinney 
mare Idylwild. He recently shipped this mare to 
Galesburg, Illinois, where she will be mated to Chas. 
Williams' great Electioneer stallion Expedition 
2:15%, sire of Bon Voyage 2:12%. 



The name of the two-year-old stallion by Allerton 
2:09%, out of Exine 2:18% by Expedition 2:15%, 
which Mr. R. O. Newman of Visalia recently pur- 
chased from C. W. Williams of Gaiesburg, III., is 
Best Policy. 42278 They say he looks every bit as 
good as his breeding. 



The advertisement of the American Association of 
Trotting Horse Breeders, which appears in this is- 
sue of the Breeder and Sportsman, is headed "Voila." 
Knowing that the majority of our readers would not 
understand the word, we have looked it up In Web- 
ster, and find that it is French and is translated 
"Behold," "There Is," or "There Are." There is 
nothing like having Webster's International at your 
elbow. 

Types and Breeds of Farm Animals is the title of 
a volume recently issued by Ginn & Co., publishers. 
It is an illustrated book of 563 pages, and describes 
all the different types of farm animals, includes 
discussions of the original habitat, of breed develop- 
ment, European history, special American history, 
work of pioneer breeders, famous animals, families 
or tribes, breed characteristics, breed and indi- 
vidual records, as, for example, milk of cows, but- 
ter, or speed of horses, etc. Many noteworthy rec- 
ords are given and numerous illustrations of famous 
animals shown. A comprehensive table of contents 
and an index form an important part of the book. 
The work is primarily intended for students in agri- 
cultural colleges and universities. Breeders and 
feeders of animals, however, will find this volume 
a valuable reference work. 



Princess W. 2:29%, a seven-year-old trotting mare 
consigned to the Combination Sale, in this city. Feb- 
ruary 11th, by Thos. Smith of Vallejo, should attract 
some lively bidding. She is by George Washington 
2:16%, a grand race horse, her dam is Urania, a 
producing mare by Kentucky Prince, her second dam 
Lady Belmont by Rysdick's Hambletonian, her third 
dam Kate, dam of three in the list, by Bellaire. 
Princess W. is a grand looking mare and an excellent 
racing prospect, as she has great speed and is level- 
headed. 



An elegantly bred pacing mare that can brush a 
two-minute shot and can be driven by a lady is Venus 
Derby 2:23, which the veteran horse breeder, Tom 
Smith, of Vallejo consigns to the Chase Combination 
Sale, to be held in this city at 478 Valencia street, 
February 11th. This mare is by Chas. Derby 2:20, 
sire of six in the 2:10 list, her dam is, by Mambrino 
Chief Jr. 11622, sire of Dollican 2:15% and four more 
in the list; second dam by Woodnut 2:16%; third 
dam by Irvington; fourth dam by Ajax; fifth dam 
by Black Hawk, and sixth dam by Gen. Taylor, the 
oid thirty-mile champion. This is a great road mare 
and can win money racing in her class. 



William Parker of Fairfield has a speedy mule 
which he wishes to race against any other mule in 
Solano county for a purse of $250. He wants the 
race to take place on the track at Dixon. Mr. Par- 
ker feels confident that he has the fastest mule in 
the county, and is willing to back his judgment with 
money, the race to take place May Day. Frank 
Turner of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm says if Parker 
will allow this offer to remain open until his mule, 
which he expects Lou Milton to drop this spring, is a 
two-year-old he will make the match and won't ob- 
ject to Parker turning his mule over to Ed Geers or 
any other great speed instructor in the meantime. 



The American Live Stock Association, which met 
last week at Denver, decided to hold its 1908 meet- 
ing in Los Angeles. Murdock Mackenzie of Trinidad 
was elected president and T. W. Tomlinson of Den- 
ver secretary. 



K. O'Grady sends five nice geldings to the Chase 
Combination Sale for February 11th. One is by 
Rev Direct 2:10, another by Welcome 2:10%, an- 
other by Hart Boswell, another by a son of Elec- 
tioneer and another by the thoroughbred stallion 
Magnet. These geldings are all broke single and 
double and are in good shape. 



Queen R. 2:12% by Redondo, whose record was 
made at the old State Fair track in Sacramento in 
1900, when P. W. Hodges drove her a winning race 
of three straight heats, beating such good ones as 
Stanton Wilkes 2:10%, Georgie B. 2:12%, Rey 
Direct 2:10, Our Roys Sister 2,: 15 and Santa Anita 
Maid 2:20, will be put up for the high dollar at the 
Combination Sale in this city, February 11th.- She 
is a wonderfully fast pacer and has two- minute 
speed on tap almost any time. She. is now ten years 
old, 16 hands high and a fine road mare with great 
style. See her at Chase's pavilion before the sale. 



The consignment of H. Brace to the Combination 
Sale on February 11th numbers five head. They are 
Lady Beck by Waldstein. Queen R. 2:12% by Re- 
dondo, Toppy by Electric, Mission by Wayland W., 
and a bay mare by Ira. All are good individuals 
and well bred. 



Jessie Herr (2) 2:18, by Charley Herr 2:07, died 
recently. She won the two-year-old pacing division 
of the Kentucky Futurity one year. 



Simmocolm Stock Farm, at Ypsilanti, Mich., has 
been sold to a breeder of coach horses. It was at 
one time the leading Michigan breeding farm. 



We sometimes hear a person say that a horse must 
be all in as he has been raced for the past three or 
four seasons. If he has been trotting below 2:10 this 
may be true, but a horse that does not race below 
that mark should be able to race much longer. Gold- 
smith Maid was on the turf sixteen years and trotted 
332 heats in 2:30 to 2:14, and won $335,000 in matches 
and purses. She was seventeen years old when she 
trotted her fastest. 



Directors of the Los Angeles Horse Show Asso- 
ciation have decided that it will not be advisable 
to give the annual exhibition this spring, owing to 
the fact that it is exceedingly difficult to find a suit- 
able place without paying an almost prohibitive 
price. Because of the Fiesta, Angeleans have been 
called upon to pledge a large amount of money for 
entertainment of the Shriners, and this fact has re- 
ceived consideration. According to horse show offi- 
cials a building is to be erected in Los Angeles within 
six months which will comply with the demands of 
an equine exhibition. It is announced that the struc- 
ture will include a large arena and be of structure 
along Madison Square Garden lines. 



Horses are having a hard time in San Francisco 
this winter, but all is not pleasant for the poor beasts 
down in sunny Los Angeles. The Times of that city 
said last week: "There is a horse famine in Los 
Angeles and most of the stables in town are equine 
hospitals. The poor beasts, suffering from mud fever, 
pulled heavy wagons and trucks through the deep 
mud of the streets as long and as faithful as they 
could, then they became mud sick. The last three 
weeks in this city have been fierce for the horse. 
Some of them have had to be dug out of the streets 
with a pick and shovel. Many have had to be taken 
home to their stables, leaving the wagon stuck in 
the mud. Some of these wagons are there still. The 
Pioneer Truck Company has sixty-seven horses laid 
up with mud fever, and about twenty trucks stuck 
in the mud, from Pico to Boyle Heights. One horse 
died of the mud fever. The Keystone Produce Com- 
pany has about half its horses laid up and is unable 
to remove a carload of goods. Other big dealers are 
just as badly off. Half the livery stables in town are 
in bad shape and full of mud-sick horses. 



With the idea of its being more agreeable to the 
animal than a metal one, German horse-breakers 
use a wooden bit, to condition a horse's mouth. 



Of the thirty-one trotters that entered the 2.10 list 
last season, sixteen made records from 2:09% to 

2:09%. 



At a meeting of the stockholders of the Kentucky 
Trotting Horse Breeders' Association, held at Lexing- 
ton, January 15th, the following officers were elected: 
President, R. C. Estill; vice-presidents, Richard C. 
Sto. and James E. Clay; secretary, Horace W. Wil- 
son; treasurer, Lexington City National Bank; direc- 
tors, Dr. John Hayward, John R. Allen, Louis Des- 
cognet, J. W. Stoll and L. V. Harkness. Secretary 
Wilson stated that it was the general belief that 
the association lost money during the season of 1906 
on account of the exceedingly bad weather that pre- 
vailed during the meeting of last October, but that 
the books showed a balance on the right side and 
the association made money. 



Folly, dam of Tiverton 2:04%, has been bought by 
N. Bartholomew, Des Moines, la., from A. A. Kitz- 
miller. Mr. Bartholomew now owns the sire and dam 
of Tiverton, and will probably try to breed more of 
the same sort. 

o 

TO CUBE A COLD IN ONE DAT 

Take I,AXATIVE BROMO Quinine Tablets. Drug- 
gists refund money if It falls to cure. E. W. GROVE'S 
signature is on each box. 25c. 



Saturday, February 2, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



The following horses are heavily insured in Lloyd's 
London Insurance Company: Dan Patch 1:55, Audu- 
bon Boy 1:59%, Sweet Marie 2:02, Cresceus 2:02%, 
Direct Hal 2:04%, Admiral Dewey 2:04% and Main- 
sheet 2:05%. Axworthy, Bingen, Bow Bells, Dreamer, 
Early Reaper and McKinney also carry large insur- 
ance. 



Tidal Wave 2:09 will be raced this year after a 
short season in the stud. He is by Nutwood Wilkes 
out of a McKinney mare, the combination that is 
producing so much speed, and it is thought that 
Tidal Wave will pace in 2:05 or better this year. 



Sixteen of the thirty-one trotters that entered the 
2:10 list last season made records from 2:09% to 
2:09%. Nine of the others made records from 2:08 
to 2:09, four of the others in 2:07%, one, Lady Gail 
Hamilton, in 2:06%, and one, Oro, in 2:05%. 



Colonel John S. Cooper says it will take fifty years 
at the present rate of breeding, importing and de- 
velopment of the country to properly stock the land 
with really good draft horses. 



When you stop to think of it, isn't Bingen 2:06% 
a rather young sire to be second in the list of money 
winning stallions in the Grand Circuit of 1906? 



The Southern Pacific Company is sending broad- 
cast a little pamphlet entitled San Francisco Hotels. 
It is designed to despel the delusion that the big fire 
burned up all the hotels in this city last April and 
that none have been built since, an idea that seems 
to have gone abroad and traveled fast. There are 
hotels enough in San Francisco at the present time 
to accommodate 5,000 transients every day, should 
that great number decide to come to this city all 
at once. 



The seventeen-year-old pacer Jakey Einstein 
2:21% that Andy McDowell once owned and con- 
sidered a coming world beater, had his leg broken 
recently while running in the pasture of his owner, 
George Walker of Denver, and had to be shot. Mr. 
Walker had used Jakey for the last ten years as 
a road horse. The horse was bred in California 
and was by a son of Sultan. 



Through a delay and a mistake in the transmission 
of a telegram from Thos. Charlton of Ukiah to the 
secretary of the convention at Pleasanton, January 
j^h, that town was not given a date on the Cali- 
fornia Circuit, but as it "wants in" the Executive 
Committee will arrange dates for it. Ukiah has 
the best half-mile track on the Coast, and they pro- 
pose to give nine purses of $300 each, which will 
attract quite a big entry list. Ukiah could come in 
just before the Breeders' meeting at Santa Rosa by 
shifting some of the preceding dates. Every effort 
will be made to take in every place that desires 
dates on the circuit. The more the merrier, and 
the better for the horsemen. 



Diablo 2:09% will make the season of 1907 at 
Woodland, Yolo county. He has many very fine 
colts and fillies in that section and will receive a 
large patronage. 



Mr. C. A. Storm of Salinas, Cal., offers for sale a 
fine filly. She is a handsome brown in color, is four 
years old, sired by Scott McKinney, son of McKin- 
ney. Her dam is by St. Patrick, son of Carr's Mam- 
brino, and her second dam by Can's Mambrino. She 
has shown a quarter in 34 seconds with very little 
work, is perfectly sound and all right every way. 
See the advertisement. 



If you want a good rig for a trip to the Cliff House 
or through the Park, call at the Dexter Prince 
Stabies, corner Grove and Baker streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 



When your horse is not doing well, perhaps it is 
caused by bad teeth. See Ira B. Dalziel at. 620 
Octavia street and have him attend to the horse. Call 
him up on the phone, Special 2074. 



The Chicago Horseman's is a good stake to enter 
in. Entries close Saturday, March 2d, when first 
payment of $5 must be made. The second payment 
of $10 is not due until November 2, 1907, and then 
there are no further payments until the year of the 
race. There is $11,000 for three-year-old trotters 
and $4,000 for three-year-old pacers. This is good 
money. Better try and win some of it. 



Owners of good mares who reside within shipping 
distance of Dixon should not overlook that good stal- 
lion McFadyen 2:15V£, record made as a two-year-old 
when he won the Pacific Breeders' Futurity. He is 
by Diablo 2:09%, one of our greatest pacing sires, 
and his dam is the famous mare Bee, dam of Frisk- 
arena 2:13%, etc., by Sterling. McFadyen is a 
horse of great individuality and that he will sire 
a very high rate of speed is as certain as anything 
in horse breeding. His service fee is only $40, and 
if any breeder desires to raise a two-minute pacer 
there is no horse he could send a mare to with more 
confidence in results. There are 2:05 pacers on both 
sides of his pedigree and he will be a 2:05 horse him- 
self when matured. He will be four years old this 
spring, and no better bred or better looking horse 
will stand for service anywhere. The best of pastur- 
age at $2.50 a month is also an inducement. Write 
to his owner, E. D. Dudley of Dixon, for particulars. 



"It is definitely decided that the Pasadena Horse 
Show will be held in Tournament Park, Pasadena, 
March 7th, 8th and 9th," writes Secretary E. D. 
Neff, "and we have made the same financial arrange- 
ments as last year, which is entirely satisfactory 
to the Horse Show Association and to the Tourna- 
ment of Roses Association. The directors of the 
Los Angeles association held a meeting last week 
and decided not to hold a show in Los Angeles this 
year, so that we expect a bigger show than ever here. 
There will undoubtedly be more out-of-town entries 
than at either of the two previous ones." Richard 
Carman, the noted whip of Long Island, who is one 
of the regular judges for the Madison Square Horse 
Show, and has judged shows at Brooklyn, Chicago, 
Boston and in Canada, has agreed to judge heavy 
harness horses at the Pasadena show. It is antici- 
pated that more people than ever before will visit 
for the spring show and the prospects are bright 
for a big success. 



A dispatch from North Yakima dated January 
22d says: Dooley & Baker of this city have closed 
a deal with O. H. Holcomb of Seattle, selling the 
latter five carloads of horses. There will be 100 
head and the total sum received for them was $10,- 
000. The horses are to be shipped to Alaska. This 
is the largest deal ever consummated at one time in 
the Yakima Valley. 



The San Francisco Riding Club's annex for driv- 
ing horses is becoming quite popular with those 
who desire good accommodations for their horses. 



Look over the announcement of the big auction 
sale to be held at Oakwood Park Stock Farm on 
Thursday, February 28th. Mr. Edward F. Humph- 
reys, manager of this great farm, advertises the 
second annual sale since his company secured pos- 
session of this great breeding farm. There are 25 
head of standard bred two-year-olds by Chas. Derby, 
Bonnie Direct, Stam B., and Nushagak out of the 
farm's best mares; 15 head of Cleveland Bay, thor- 
oughbred and work horses, and 30 head of register- 
ed two-year-old Durham bulls. This sale should at- 
tract a big crowd to the farm on the day of the 
sale. 



The first 1907 foal of the great Kinney Lou 2:07% 
arrived at Redwood City on the morning of the 19th 
instant, and is the property of Mr. W. -J. Dingee. 
His dam is that good trotting mare Flora M. 2:16 
by Richard's Elector. Mr. Dennis writes that it is 
the finest looking yoangster he ever saw. 



Fred Chadbourne has in his string at Pleasanton 
a two-year-old colt by Kinney Lou 2:07% that is 
the most promising two-year-old trotting prospect 
at the track. The colt is a handsome brown, with 
white ankles behind, of good size, and well made, 
as are all of Kinney Lou's colts. He is a pure 
gaited fellow with splendid trotting action, and, 
like his sire, has trot in his head. His owner, Mr. 
H. W. Meek, of San Lorenzo, is so well pleased with 
him that he will breed his dam, the great brood 
mare Cricket 2:10 by Steinway, back to him. 

o 

REDLAC 2:0714 AT LOS ANGELES. 



In our advertising columns this week will be 
found announcement of the Allerton stallion Redlac 
2:07%, a grand race horse and the fastest trotting 
stallion by the records now in service in this State. 

Redlac was foaled in 1897, and as a three-year-old 
in 1900 started three times. On August 23d that 
year at Galesburg, Illinois, he won the $1000 stake 
for three-year-old trotters, taking a record of 2:18%. 
A few days later he was a starter in a race for aged 
horses at Poutiac, but failed to win, but on Septem- 
ber 12th at Monmouth he again met a field of aged 
horses and won first money after six heats had been 
trotted. He was not raced as a four-year-old, but 
in his five-year-old form he started in five races, in 
which he twice won second money and once third and 
reduced his record to 2:16%. He was a close sec- 
ond that year in heats where the time was around 
2:12. Redlac was not raced in 1903, but in 1904 
made a great campaign, starting ten times and clos- 
ing the year with a record of 2:08!,2. In his first three 
races that season he was not in shape and failed 
to get in the money, but. in his next seven races he 
won four first moneys and three seconds and trotted 
like the game race horse he is. In 1905 he started 
six times, was twice first, twice second, once third 
and once fourth, and reduced his record to 2:07V£. As 
he was racing in the 2:08 class that year he was up 
against very hot company and his showing was there- 
fore a most excellent one. 

Redlac is by the great, race horse and sire, Aller- 
ton 2:09%, his dam is the producing mare Grandma 
by Muscovite, best son of Nutwood, and his grandani 
a great broodmare by J. W. Tedford 27518, a son of 
Ensign 469. 

Redlac's breeding is very strong in the lines of 
speed and endurance, and as he is a grand individual 
and is proving a very prepotent sire, he will be 
a very valuable addition to the breeding ranks of 
California trotting horses. 

The first of his get old enough to race were started 
last season, and six of them, one of which was but 
two years old, took standard records. A three-year- 
old trotter got a record of 2:22V 2 . This is a good 
showing for any sire. 

Redlac will be in the stud at Agricultural Park, 
Los Angeles, this season. Read the advertisement in 
our business columns. 



ZOMBRO WILL STAND AT WOODLAND. 

Yolo county is rapidly becoming the leading live 
stock breeding section of the State. The herds of 
pure bred cattle, sheep and hogs owned in that 
county are getting more numerous and more famous 
every year, and there is also much attention being 
paid by the progressive Yolo farmers to different 
l>reeds of fine horses. Several farms devoted to 
thoroughbreds are located there, many fine Percheron 
and Belgian stallions are owned in that vicinity and 
the array of trotting bred stallions that can be 
shown during the breeding season is equal in num- 
ber and quality to those located in any county in 
the State. The class of driving horses owned by 
the residents of Yolo county excites the admiration 
of every horseman who visits that section, and there 
is hardly a farmer or fruit grower but owns one 
or more well bred and good sized trotting mares, 
which he sends regularly to some good stallion. 
The latest stallion owner to decide upon going to 
Woodland with his horse is Mr. Geo. T. Beckers, 
who owns the greatest producing son of McKinney, 
Zombro 2:11. 

One of the great attractions of Yolo county for a 
stallion owner is the splendid pasturage for mares 
that can be secured there. Yolo is a wonderful hay 
and alfalfa producing section, which is one reason 
for the fact that the different kinds of stock owned 
there are always in good condition. That Zombro 
can get a full book in almost any locality in Cali- 
fornia is certain, and at Woodland, where Mr. 
Beckers will take him early in February, uis book 
will fill early. One great inducement for farmers 
who own well bred mares to patronize Zombro is 
the fact that his get bring good prices in every 
market in the United States. One seldom hears of 
a Zombro colt or filly for sale, and when sold they 
invariably bring their breeders a good profit. He 
is a magnificent individual himself and transmits 
his size, color, splendid disposition and speed to his 
get with great uniformity. His presence in Yolo 
county during the heason of 1907 will be of great 
advantage to the horse breeders of that section. 

o 

ANOTHER GREAT SALE. 



The second semi-annual sale of standard bred 
horses and thoroughbred bulls bred and raised at 
the famous Oakwood Park Stock Farm, will take 
place at the Farm on Thursday, February 28th. It 
will repay anyone to make the trip to this magnifi- 
cent farm on the day of the sale whether anything 
is purchased or not, as it is undoubtedly the grand- 
est and most beautiful stock farm on the Pacific 
Coast, and well worth a trip to see. On this occa- 
sion there will be sold to the highest bidder 25 
standard bred two-year-old colts, fillies and yearl- 
ings by such sires as Chas. Derby 2:20, Bonnie 
Direct 2:05%, Stam B. 2:11% and Nushagak 25939, 
the sire of Aristo. Two-year-olds by such high class 
stallions out of the famous mares of Oakwood Park 
should be eagerly bid on and bring good prices. In 
addition to these youngsters, 15 head of Cleveland 
Bay, thoroughbred and well bred work horses are 
to be sold, many of them just the sort for which 
there is a demand now in this market. For the 
cattle men, 30 head of two-year-old registered Dur- 
ham Bulls will be offered. They are by King Spicy 
2d, 154525, Bessie's Marquis 205085, and Humboldt 
Victor 175071. 

With standard breds, Cleveland Bays, thorough- 
breds, work horses and Durham bulls to pick from, 
thiss ale should be a big attraction for buyers from 
all over the coast. This is only the first aifnounce- 
ment of this sale, and Manager Edward M. Humph- 
rey will have more particulars to give later on in 
these columns. He has secured the services of that 
popular Alameda county auctioneer, Mr. Louis Shaf- 
fer, for this sale. 



KILLING DUMB ANIMALS. 



"Why will so many people cling to the idea that 
chloroforming is the most merciful means of death 
possible for dumb animals?" asked a veterinarian 
recently. "Only the other day 1 was called upon to 
perform the trying and almost impossible task of 
killing an old horse in this way. 

"The horse, it seems, had been the pet of a 
wealthy woman who left provision for him in her 
will and decreed that if ever thp family to whose 
care she intrusted him should deem it necessary to 
end his life this should be done with chloroform, so 
that he might be assured a painless death. Then 
the horse became blind and otherwise disabled, and 
the family decided that death -would be a mercy. 

"Of course, the provision of the will had to be 
carried out, but no greater case of mistaken kind- 
ness could have been possible. It is impossible to 
administer sufficient chloroform at one time to kill 
an animal the size of a horse, so dose after dose 
had to be given, the poor brute slowly and painfully 
smothering to death. 

"Chloroform is all right for cats or dogs, but for 
larger animals it is a positive cruelty, whereas a 
pistol, well aimed at the head of any beast, will 
send it out of life so quickly that it has not time to 
feel the shot or realize what has happened." — New 

York Press. 

o 

A New York brewery has contracted for 125 heavy 
draft horses at $150 per head. 



Your stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's Napa 
Soda. 



G 



THE BREEDER 



AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 2, 1907. 



ZOLOCK 2:05i 4 . 



Of the sons of McKinney 2: 11% that are deserved- 
ly popular, both as race horses and sires, is that 
grand horse Zolock 2:05%, whose season will be 
made this year at Agricultural Park, Ix>s Angeles, as 
will be seen by the announcement in our advertising 
columns. Zolock is beyond doubt one of the greatest 
horses ver bred on the Pacific Coast and he enjoys 
the distinction of being the fastest stallion sired by 
McKinney. His breeding is unsurpassed. His dam, 
Gazelle, was a great trotter, taking a race record of 
2: and on entering the broodmare ranks gained 
fame from the first, as she is already the dam of 
two with records below 2:08 — Zolock 2:05% and 
Zephyr 2: 07%, the latter a trotter. She is also the 
dam of Abe Miller, that took a trotting race record 
of 2:21% last season, and is reckoned a coming 2:10 
performer. Gazelle is by Gossiper 2:14%, an ele- 
gantly bred son of the great Simmons. Gossiper has 
sired the dams of Cuate 2:13%, and his daughters are 
all very highly thought of as broodmares. The Sim- 
mons blood is considered particularly good in a brood- 
mare that one is expecting to raise extreme speed 
from. Simmons sired the dams of such famous ones 
as Fereno 2:05%, Bonnie Direct 2:05%. Hal C. 2:05%, 
Bonnie Steinway 2:06%, and the three-year-old cham- 
pion pacer of 1906, Brenda Yorke 2:08%. The gran- 
dam of Zolock is Gypsie, a great broodmare, by Gen. 
Boots 2:30%, son of the old-time champion Geo. M. 
Patchen. Gypsie has produced Gazelle 2:11%, Ed 
Winship 2:15. Willets 2:17. Dixie S. 2:27, and bred 
to Zolock produced that great mare Delilah, that 
won the Futurity and took a record of 2:14% as a 
three-year-old, which mark she reduced to 2:09% as 
a four-year-old. The third dam of Zolock is Echo 
Belle, grandam of Conn 2:15%, by Echo, son of Ham- 
bletonian 10. and sire of the dams of Direct 2:05%, 
Capt. Derby 2:06%. Rex Alto 2:07% and Loupe 
2:09%. 

From the above it will be seen that Zolock has 
producing lines on both sides of his pedigree, and 
they are lines that have produced extreme and early 
speed. As a race horse all breeders in California 
are familiar with his record. He was the undisputed 
champion of 1905 the last year he was raced and 
there was not a horse that could make him stretch 
his neck to win that year. 

In the stud he has already acquired the reputation 
of siring fast and game race winners. He has two 
2:10 performers already — Bystander 2:08 and De- 
lilah (4) 2:09%, both entering this list last season. 
In addition to these two celebrities he has sired 
Ambush 2:20 as a three-year-old and 2:14 as a four- 
year-old, Zolahka 2:23%, winner of last year's two- 
year-old trotting division of the Breeders' Futurity, 
Sherlock Holmes 2:11-/4, a 2:05 candidate, Dixie S. 
2:27 and many others that have shown a very high 
rate of speed as two and three-year-olds. His indi- 
viduality, speed, breeding and the power to transmit 
these qualities are the qualifications that the most 
progressive and successful breeders are now looking 
for in a sire. Henry Delaney, who drove him to 
his mark and who has handled him most success- 
fully for several years j>ast, has him in charge again 
this year. His address and further particulars 
about this great horse will be found in the adver- 
tisement on another page. 

o 

RARE OPPORTUNITY TO GET GOOD ONES. 



At the forthcoming sale of- trotting bred horses, 
February 11th. at Chase & Co.'s new pavilion, on Va- 
lencia street, the consignment of Mr. T. J. Crowley, 
consisting of Lottie Parks 2:16% and four of her 
colts by celebrated trotting sires, will be offered for 
sale. 

Pemberton, five-year-old brown gelding, carries 
more of the blood of the two champions of the world 
in his veins than any other horse bred in America, 
being by Boydello 2:14%. he by Boydell, full brother 
to Del Mar, sire of Major Delmar 1:59%, dam Lottie 
Parks 2:16%, by Cupid 2:18. full brother to Sidney 
Dillon, sire of Lou Dillon 1:58%. This gelding was 
worked a little as a three-year-old, trotted a mile in 
2:36 and a quarter in 35 seconds. 

Islamite, four-year-old chestnut gelding by Owyhee 
2:11. Owyhee was by Chas. Derby, one of the 
greatest speed producing sires in California. Islamite 
has trotted quarters in 40 seconds. 

Commodore Sloat, three year-old chestnut colt by 
Monterey 2:09%. This colt was entered in the 
Breeders' Futurity and the Crowley Stake No. 1, 
and if be had not met with a slight accident while 
running in the paddock, he would unquestionably be 
a formidable contender in those stakes. Monterey, 
the sire of this colt, was one of the gamest race 
horses on the American turf, having been timed 
separately in his races in the East in 2:06 and bet- 
ter. This colt is halter broke and kind and gentle. 

Katherine C, two-year-old brown filly, is a superb 
field trotter, and full sister to Commodore Sloat, be- 
ing by Monterey 2:09% out of Lottie Parks 2:16%. 
T his filjy is entered and paid up on in the Breeders' 
Futurity and Crowley Stake No. 2. 

From the breeding and conformation of these colts 
it would appear that they should attract the attention 
of horsemen all over the Coast, as there are fewer, if 
any, offered at sales that could command higher 
commendation. 

Mr. Crowley reluctantly offers this mare and her 
tour cults fin' sal<-. as he raised them 011 purpose to 
race in California, but he is now engaged in mining, 
and we are sorry to say will be far removed from 



the racing centers. Mr. Crowley has always been 
an ardent admirer of the trotting horse, being for 
about fifteen years a member and director of the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association, 
and has during all these years officiated in the 
judges' stand and has always given satisfaction 
where called upon to exercise his judgment. From 
recent reports he has a very valuable property in 
the mining district of Tuolumne county, and it is our 
heartfelt wish that he may succeed in his new enter- 
prise. F. 

o 

COMING TO HIS OWN. 



When James W. Rea, the well known San Jose 
politician and business man. was in the trotting horse 
business he desired a stallion to head his stud known 
as the Vendome Stock Farm, so he went to Palo 
Alto Stock Farm and purchased what he considered 
about the best colt there. This was Iran Alto, a 
son of the great trotting stallion Palo Alto 2:08%. 
and the great broodmare Elaine 2:20, champion 
three-year-old of 1S7X and champion four-year-old of 
1879. Iran Alto was foaled in 1892, and in 1895, 
when he was three years old, trotted to a record 
of 2:19%, winning the stake for foals of his age 
given at that meeting. In 1898, when he was six 
years old Iran Alto reduced this record to 2:13% 
in a winning race of five heats, and the following 
year again reduced his record to 2:12%. In the stud 
Iran Alto did not have the best of opportunities 
when at Vendome Stock Farm, for although Mr. Rea 
had a few good mares, he made little effort to secure 
outside patronage to his horse, being too busy with 
other matters, and Iran Alto's colts were few in 
number. During the past three years Iran Alto has 
been under the management of Mr. H. S. Hogoboom 
of Woodland, and is just beginning to prove the claim 
always made for him by his owner and also by the 
superintendent of Palo Alto Stock Farm, the late 
F. W. Covey, that he would be a great sire of speed, 
endurance and race horse qualities. Iran Alto is 
now the sire of six with standard records and one 
of his daughters is already a producer of standard 
speed. He was called into prominence as a sire 
last year by the remarkable performances of his 
son, Dr. Frasse, that went through the Great Western 
Circuit and part of the Grand Circuit, winning a 
number of very hotly contested and long-drawn 
races, reduced his record to 2:11%, and was a 
close second on more than one occasion when the 
heats were below 2:10. At several of the California 
tracks the young Iran Alto's are now being worked 
and there is not one but is showing a high rate of 
speed at the trot or pace. The gelding Admiral 
Togo, that took a two-year-old record of 2:29%, is 
a son of Iran Alto, and if there was ever a 2:10 
trotter, he is one, and 2:08 is not considered beyond 
his reach this year if raced. The colts and fillies by 
Iran Alto show great style and finish in nearly 
every instance. Iran Alto is a very breedy looking 
horse himself and transmits the fine head and neck 
round barrel and excellent feet and legs of the 
true race horse. He has been bred during the past 
few years to some very highly bred mares and in 
the very near future some of his get will secure rec- 
ords that will add much to the reputation and the 
value of all his get. Those who send mares to him 
now while his fee is a most reasonable one will not 
regret it. His advertisement will be found in an- 
other part of this paper. 

-o 

CHASE'S NEW PAVILION. 



When Fred H. Chase began the erection of his 
new sales pavilion at 478 Valencia street, after the 
fire, he had many things to overcome, but finally 
got started and put up his box-stalls, which are 
the best ever built in this city. For the first few 
sales held during this fall and winter he was com- 
pelled to use a large tent in which to show and 
auction the horses, and the rains and winds, which 
seem to have visited us this year in greater force 
than usual, played havoc with his canvas on two or 
three occasions. Recently, however, a force of car- 
penters have been at work putting up the new perma- 
nent pavilion, and when the Combination Sale 
comes off on Monday night, February 11th, it will 
be held under the roof of this new building, and 
even should the rain fall in torrents, spectators and 
horses will be housed comfortably from the storm 
and can defy the elements. The new pavilion will 
be very large, roomy in every way, brilliantly 
lighted and comfortably seated. Horses can be 
shown at speed either in harness or to halter, there 
being a straight track nearly 200 feet long to show 
them on. Mr. Chase now has the only place in 
the city where high-class auction horses can be 
stabled and shown in all kinds of weather. 

o 

The six-year-old stallion Owynex 2:22, registered 
No. 37626, is offered for sale. He is a grand look- 
ing young trotter, one of the best ever bred at the 
famous Oak wood Park Stock Farm. He is by Owyhee 
2:11. sire of Owyho 2:07%, and his dam. Inex 2:22%. 
is a great broodmare, being the dam of that fast 
trotter Our Jack 2:13%, Owynex 2:22 and Alamo 
2:29%. She is by Sweepstakes 298, a producing son 
of Hambletonian 10. and out of a producing mare 
by Kentucky Bertrand. son of thoroughbred Bert- 
rand; her second dam by American Star 14, and 
third dam by Gridley's Roebuck. Owynex is of 
good size, standing 15.3 and weighing about 1200 
pounds. He is a bright rich bay, has an excllent 
dispotion and is very stylish. See advertisement in 
this issue. 



JAY EYE SEE. 

On our title page this week is a picture of the old- 
time champion Jay Eye See, the first horse to trot 
in 2:10. He is still living at the age of twenty-eight, 
and leads a life of ease and comfort in the private 
stable of H. M. Wallis, president of the J. I. Case 
Plough Company of Racine, Wis. The picture is 
from a recent photograph sent to the New York 
Sports of the Times, and shows the old champion to 
be remarkably well preserved. 

Jay Eye See was foaled in 1878, and was bought 
by the late J. I. Case, who at that time was one of 
the great agricultural implement manufacturers of 
the West, with large works at Racine, Wis., and 
also owned a large stock farm and racing stable. 
Ed Bither was his trainer and to him belongs the 
honor of being the first driver to give a trotter a rec- 
ord of 2:10. It was also the irony of fate that the 
famous black son of Dictator only held the honor for 
a day, as Maud S. trotted in 2:09% the day after. 

Jay Eye See began his turf career as a four-year- 
old in 1S82, and on September 23, at Chicago, won a 
notable victory over Bronze, trotting the third and 
fourth heats in 2:19 each. In 1883, he defeated 
such celebrated campaigners as Charley Ford, Phil 
Thompson, Lucy Gernet, Bronze Adelaide, Majolica, 
Director, Clemmie G. and the champion St. Jullen, 
and Providence, R. I., on August 1, 1884, he trotted 
to a record of 2:10. At Indianapolis, Iowa, on August 
26, 1902, long after he had finished his regular turf 
career, he was driven at the pace by Jackson Case, 
the son of J. I. Case, in 2:06%. 

The grand old campigner was exhibited at the 
Wisconsin State Fair at Milwaukee last autumn 
and was one of the star attractions, and when led out 
on the track and saw other horses getting ready 
for the word felt the fire of enthusiasm again and 
tried to get away from his groom. He was with 
difficulty led back to his stall, where he held a grand 
reception and was petted and kissed by the ladies, 
while many an old track veteran in reminiscent mood 
gave him an affectionate greeting, as he told of the 
great races in which the old champion had been 
the victor. Jay Eye See was by the great Dictator, 
dam Midnight, by Pilot Jr.; second dam Twilight 
by Lexington. Though twenty-eight years old he is 
still active. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



Subscriber, San Jose. — Gen. Logan 17604 has a 
trotting record of 2:23%. He is by Alexander But- 
ton (sire of Yolo Maid 2:12, Thos. Ryder 2:13%, 
Mollie Button 2:14, Mattie H. 2:15% and twenty-two 
more in the list). The dam of Gen. Logan was Win- 
nie by St. Clair, son of St. Clair 16675, grandam by 
St. Charles, son of St. Louis. General Logan is sire 
of Miss Logan 2:06% and several others in the list. 
The sire of Alexander Button was Alexander 490, a 
son of Geo. M. Patchen Jr. We do not know any- 
thing of Idleweiss or her dam. 

o 

The chestnut stallion Bo D'Arc, formerly owned 
by Milo Potter Esq., has been leased to C. W. 
Heegle of Alhambra. Bo D'Arc's colts are showing 
speed and inherit the sire's beauty also. 



In printing Mr. F. Gommet's entry in the Occident 
Stake for foals of 1906, the mistake was made of 
giving the breeding of his entry in the stake of 1905. 
The entry for foals of 1906 is a bay colt by Strathway 
out of Rosetta by Mcivinney. 

o 

The chestnut filly Irene S. by Petigru, dam Jo- 
hanna Treat, was omitted from the list of those eli- 
gible to start in the Crowley Stake, which was 
printed in the Breeder and Sportsman a few weeks 
ago. She now belongs to W. G. Durfee of Los 
Angeles. 



Dan O'Keefe of the Western Meat Company, who 
developed and sold the fast pacing mare Centereye. 
owns a very handsome youngster by Lecco 2:09% 
that is beginning to learn the ways of the track and 
is proving a very apt pupil. 



Deputy 2:13% by Derby Ash is looking well and 
doing well in Fred Chadbourn's charge at Pleasanton. 
Deputy Sheriff Mark Smith of Stockton was down 
to see him one day last week. 

o 

BE DISTEMPER EXPERTS. 



The class (if horse diseases which includes distemper, 
influenza, pinkeye, etc., is one upon which the horse 
owner can not have too much information. Epidemics 
may come at any time and the knowledge of how to 
prevent and cure may be invaluable. You will notice 
in the advertisement of Craft's Distemper Cure in this 
issue that a new pamphlet called "Dr. Craft's Advice" 
is offered free. Write for It at once. It contains expert 
information in regard to the diagnosis, treatment, 
nursing, etc.. in these ailments and will enahle you to 
handle them with utmost success. Address Wells Medi- 
cine Co., 13 Third St.. Lafayette, Ind. 

O 

California's favorite hot weather drink 1> Jackson'B 
Napa Soda. 



Saturday, February 2, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



THE HORSE MARKET OF 1906. 

Chicago is beyond all doubt the center of the 
horse market of the United States, and prices re- 
ceived there are a better standard of the average 
that horses are really worth in the market than 
those received at any other points. 

In reviewing the Chicago horse market for 1906 
the Drover's Journal shows that the year was a 
remarkable one in this field of industry. From the 
review the following excerpts are taken: 

The enormous commercial activity in all sections 
of the country evolved an increased demand for 
horses for industrial use. Locally the broad ac- 
tivities in the building industry stimulated inquiry 
for heavy business classes. Large new manufactur- 
ing plants in Chicago and nearby localities broad- 
ened the consumption of heavy team offerings. At 
Gary the new $75,000,000 steel plant swelled the 
local inquiry for heavy business classes, and from 
all quarters orders were of more than normal vol- 
ume. 

The southern trade in particular was of increased 
proportions, and the outlet for small, active chunks 
was at no time congested. Not only were nearly 
all the large southern operators represented in the 
trade, but the demand ruled so broad that many 
local dealers speculated liberally in small horses, 
consigning their purchases to Atlanta, Ga., Mont- 
gomery, Ala., Richmond and Norfolk, Va., and other 
southern distributing points. Many horses were pur- 
chased direct for consignment to New Orleans, com- 
prising fire department animals, heavy drafters, 
smooth, light chunks and light harness classes. 

There has been a marvelous evolution in the South 
in the last five years. Her manufacturing output has 
enormously increased and her agriculture broadened. 
In the great cities gigantic improvements in public 
buildings, sewerage and street paving created a 
broader demand for horses. There is a wonderful 
transformation in the agriculture of the southern 
States. Corn, cotton, rice and other commodities are 
produced in greater quantities and the wider tillage 
of the land has broadened the consumption of horses. 

The light, rich alluvial soil of the southern States 
is easily cultivated with lighter horses than are 
required to work the heavy clay and black loam 
land of the middle west and northern States. Horses 
weighing 900 to 1100 pounds are of ample weight 
for use on southern plantations, while heavier classes 
are required for the heavy teaming industry of south- 
ern cities. Tens of thousands of light chunks are 
raised contiguous to the Chicago market and the 
large orders for this class attracted liberal consign- 
ments of light chunks from Iowa, Nebraska, Michi- 
gan, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas 
and Missouri for southern account. The large in- 
fusion of trotting and thoroughbred blood in these 
small horses gives them a good finish and imparts 
a high degree of intelligence and endurance. 

Local dealers obtained more advantages through 
routing of consignments purchased for southern 
points than could be arranged at western points, 
and many special advantages induced dealers to 
place their orders at the Chicago market on southern 
account. The movement south of this useful class 
was of enormous volume, while average prices ruled 
stronger than the previous year. Large consign- 
ments of 1400 to 1500 pound offerings were also 
taken for southern shipment at an average cost of 
$175 to $200 per head. In fact a distinguishing fea- 
ture of the market was the phenomenal increase in 
the southern trade in all commercial classes of 
horses. 

Even before the dawn of authentic history horses 
occupied a prominent place in the evolution of man- 
kind from savagery to civilization. The Red Sea 
swallowed up the horses and chariots of Pharoah, 
sent to capture the Israelites when emancipated 
from their bondage in Egypt. Horses performed 
a conspicuous part in ancient wars and the conqueror 
rides on a horse at the head of his victorious legions. 

Horses are among the first recorded domestic ani- 
mals. The horse was early used at a beast of 
burden and to cultivate the soil. His intelligence, 
tractability, endurance and adaptation to all zones 
make him admirably adapted for general utility ser- 
vice. In wars he carried the soldiers and hauled 
the commissary supplies and in peace he was utilized 
in the exploitation of agriculture. 

There is a universal sentiment that the horse is 
a man's best friend in the stui>endous struggle for 
the survival of the fittest. Without the horse civil- 
ization would have been centuries nearer to savagery. 
The pioneers who blazed the way to the modern em- 
pire of the corn belt would have been powerless to 
subdue the stubborn soil and make the desert places 
blossom as the rose without the aid of the horse. 
Modern agriculture would congest more than 50 
per cent if it were not for the noble beast harnessed 
to improved machinery that cultivates and garners 
the crops. Look at the horde of coolies employed to 
move the freight handled by a ten-ton truck vehicle 
moved by four matchless draft horses! 

While but one record for individual or consign- 
ment sales was surpassed during the year, all classes 
of horses sold at higher average prices. Early in 
the season D. D. McGregor of Tingley, Iowa, was 
represented with a consignment of twenty drafters 
that sold at an average of $315, one pair being nego- 
tiated to the Schwarzschild & Sulzberger Co. for 
$850. Later E. L. Meyemoffer of Maquoketa, Iowa, 
sold twelve head of top drafters at an average of 
$350, one matched pair of Percherons' being knocked 
down to Armour & Co. for $1100. Later Abe Klee 
& Son, Chicago, sold twenty head of extreme weight 



and finished drafters to the Pittsburg Horse and 
Mule Company at an average of $352, the world's 
record for average price for a load of draft horses. 
The previous record was $300.25, made by John 
Harshberger. Arthur. 111., in 1903. 

The consensus of opinion of dealers is that the 
Quality of the horses marketed this season shows 
improvement. Commission dealers have been a po- 
tential force in elevating the quality of commercial 
horses. This great wholesome market has exerted 
an impressive influence on the horse industry of 
the middle west, where the bulk of the heavy busi- 
ness classes are raised. Farmers are fast learning 
that quality in horses as well as in other branches 
of live stock has a commercial value and to realize 
good prices a good horse must be offered the trade, 

Since 1900 the great International Live Stock Ex- 
positions have annually accomplished a highly edu- 
cational work in presenting to farmers a living ob- 
ject lesson of the best types of the heavy draft 
and coach horse breeds. Not only the best repre- 
sentatives of domestic bred horses, but also the 
choicest specimens from abroad have been exhibited 
and competed for honors. Draft animals of mas- 
tadon proportions and symmetrical conformation have 
been shown to heavy trucks and breeders had the 
opportunity to see the best draft animals yet pro- 
duced perform to heavy vehicles. Horses that cost 
$1300 per pair and $600 for single animals were ex- 
hibited with all the appointments used in regular 
commercial service. The heavy harness contests 
always attracted an immense crowd and enthused 
the visitors to the International Show. 

Another potent force operating to elevate the qual- 
ity of the heavy business classes is the magnificent 
draft and coach stallions imported into the United 
States from Europe during the past decade. The 
American importer has caught the spirit of the in- 
dustrial demand for better horses and is canvassing 
the breeding districts of France, Belgium, Germany. 
Scotland and England to buy the best representa- 
tives cf all the registered breeds of draft and coach 
horses. When a two-year-old stallion like Dragon, 
or a three-year-old like Pour Quois Pas, each com- 
mand the enormous price of $5000, it becomes self- 
evident that importers are bringing into the country 
the best horses produced in Europe. The impressive 
prepotency of these great stallions is fast elevating 
the standard of the commercial horses coming to the 
market. In fact, so great has been the drain on the 
studs of France, and so many of the champions have 
been imported to America, that many intelligent 
breeders predict that the day is not far distant when 
the breeding establishments of France will be com- 
pelled to draw on American breeders to improve 
their studs. 

The pessimist may predict that the horse in the 
industrial and commercial world will be superseded 
by motor vehicles and become a commodity of no 
intrinsic value. The alarmist has sounded the ex- 
tinction of the horse with the introduction of each 
new motor invention. When the locomotive appear- 
ed and freight and passengers were moved at light- 
ning speed to distant points, croakers saw the dawn 
of a horseless age. The invention only relieved the 
horse from one sphere of usefulness to place him 
in a broader field of productiveness. The cable and 
electric motors now hnndle the street car lines of 
cities and the horse is relegated to more remunera- 
tive service. 

Everything produced has a value measured by the 
cost of production and the quality of the commodity 
created. For ten years horses have steadily ad- 
vanced in price, keeping pace with improved quality 
and the cost of production. Land values have doubled 
in a decade. The prices of oats, corn and wheat 
are nearly double the quotations of a decade ago. 
The horse therefore costs much more to produce 
than during the era of low prices half a score of 
years ago. If the horse has reached a high level of 
values it is because the animal costs more to pro- 
duce and also has a higher earning ability. From 
the very nature of industrial conditions the horse is 
only holding his own in an era of high prices in 
which all commercial commodities have advanced 55 
per cent since 1K90. 

Outside of the railway transportation service 
nearly all industries are promoted by the use of 
the horse. All the great metropolitan cities call for 
more horses. All the local distribution of merchan- 
dise is performed by horses. The fire departments 
of great cities are equipped with horses. Ice and 
express companies deliver their goods with horses. 
The speeding of horses is a national amusement and 
the sport of kings. If Atlas supported the world, so 
do horses make possible the agricultural achieve- 
ments of the twentieth century, in whatever direc- 
tion one turns, he is confronted with the horse. Me 
is found on the battlefield in the thickest of the car- 
nage. He disports on the boulevards of great cities 
in gorgeous harness and costly vehicles. He is seen 
at commercial centers moving ponderous loads of 
merchandise that, enrich a nation. In the agricultural 
districts operating modern machinery, he tills the 
granaries of the world with the life sustaining prod 
nets of the soil. The horse is one of the potential 
forces that evolved modern civilization and bis 
sphere of usefulness is destined to broaden in ful- 
filling the destiny of his creation. 

o 

J. O. Gerrety has sold for Mr. W. A. Clark Jr. to 
Mr. Chas. Dixon of Chillicothe, Mo., the good pacer 
Spin 2:10 that was raced through the Great Western 
Circuit last year with good results by Mr. Gerrety. 
spin won among other races the <jik $6000 pace at 
Hamline, reducing his record to 2:10 in the filth and 
final heat. Spill will be used as a pleasure horse 
by his new owner, who will also race him. 



THE GRAND CIRCUIT. 

The stewards of the Grand Circuit met on January 
15th at the Hoffman House in New York, appointed 
officers and arranged the dates for the coming year. 
In spite of many rumors the session was decidedly 
harmonious. President 1). .1. Campau, who has occu- 
pied the office for many years with signal ability and 
success, though pressed to accept re-election, abso- 
lutely declined. .1. M. Johnson, president of the New 
England Breeders' Association, was unanimously 
elected. Mr. Canipau's announcement that he had 
arranged for the use of the famous Detroit track 
for the usual Grand Circuit meeting was received 
with genuine joy. and Detroit heads the list of 
dates on July 22d to 26th. We need hardly say that 
the two star events of this meeting, the Merchants' 
& Manufacturers' $10,000 and the Chamber of Com- 
merce $5,000 stakes, will be continued and that the 
Detroit program will worthily lead off the great 
meetings of the year. 

Cleveland will repeat its grand experiment of last 
year and hold a meeting irrespective of narrow-mind 
ed bigots and scheming politicians. The associa- 
tion is very strong socially and commands the sup- 
port and attendance of Cleveland society as well 
as the general public and the leading stables of 
the country will loyally support the meeting. The 
Cleveland card will be fully up to the standard. 
The dates are July 29th to August 3d. Grand old 
Buffalo wheels into line on August 5th to 10th and 
always commands the united support of horsemen 
and the public. The meeting has an international 
flavor, as many Canadian horses are always entered, 
and special race trains from Toronto, Hamilton and 
other near-by cities in the Dominion bring hosts of 
visitors. Secretary Bentley will get out a program 
which will be both strong and popular, and the 
horsemen will do the rest., 

Hudson River Park, Poughkeepsie, follows Buffalo 
and all horsemen who know Secretary H. N. Bain 
know that Poughkeepsie will do its utmost to secure 
a successful meeting, and as no dates have been 
claimed for New York metropolitan horsemen, will 
be strongly in evidence at Hudson River Park. Bos- 
ton follows Poughkeepsie and then comes Provi- 
dence, and it is to be hoped that the latter will be 
in line, though if not, Iioston will do as it did last 
year, fill in a second week. Hartford has its old 
dates beginning on Labor Day and then comes Syra- 
cuse with its double combination of the New York 
State Fair and the Grand Circuit meeting. Then 
comes the long jump to Columbus, Cincinnati and 
Memphis. Judge Hayt will again preside and Mr. 
Newton will again be starter. Let us hope that the 
bright sun of success will shine without a cloud on 
the Grand Circuit of 1907. — Sports of the Times. 

o 

POLO AND PONY RACING FIESTA. 



Announcements are out for the racing and polo 
fiesta to be held near San Mateo this month under 
the auspices of the California Polo and Pony Racing 
Association. The carnival will open at Mr. Chas. W. 
Clark's country place with the preliminary game of 
pole on Thursday, February 21st. On the follow- 
ing day polo play will be continued on Francis J. 
Carolan's private field at Crossways Farm, Ilurlin- 
game. Saturday will be given over to the pony 
races, which will be held on Clark's six-furlong 
track. The fiesta will be brought to a close the 
following day with the deciding match of the polo 
tournament on Clark's field. 

The race which is expected to create the greatest 
interest is called the "Ladies' Plate." The ponies 
in this race are to he nominated by ladies. The 
nominator of the winner will receive a gold bracelet 
and the nominator of the second pony a gold 
brooch. The rider of the winner will receive a scarf 
pin. The prizes for this race have been presented 
by Mrs. Charles W. Clark. Other donors of prize 
cups are Rudolph Spreckels, Francis J. Carolan. 
Thomas A. Driscoll, R. M. Tobin and C. W. Clark. 

The official program of races, as drawn up by 
Robert Leighlon. secretary of the California Polo 
and Pony Racing Association, follows: 

The Debutante Cup — For maiden poines: lop 
weight. 160 pounds; 2 pounds allowed for each quar- 
ter-inch under 1 I hands 2 inches; prize, cup present- 
ed by % T. A. Driscoll; one-quarter mile. 

The Unity Cup — For Galloways; top weight 160 
pounds; 3 pounds allowed for each halt-inch lo 11 
bands 2 inches: prize, cup presented by Rudolph 
Spreckels; six furlongs. 

The Ladies' Plate— The ponies in this race to 
be nominated by ladies; lop weight 160 pounds; 
2 pounds allowed for each quarter-Inch under 14 
bands 2 inches. Prizes — To the lady who nominates 
the winner a gold bracelet, to the lady who nomi- 
nates the second a gold brooch, to the rider of the 
winner a scarf pin; prizes presented by Mrs. Charles 
W. Clark; three-eighths mile. 

The Auction Cup — The winner to be sold by auc- 
tion for $500; top weight 165 pounds; 5 pounds al- 
lowed for each $50 less to $250; beaten ponies not 
subject to claim; prize, cup presented by R, M. 
Tobin; one-half mile. 

The Burlingame Cup — Top weight 155 pounds; 2 
pounds allowed for each quarter-inch under 14 
hands 2 inches; prize, cup presented by Francis J. 
Carolan; six furlongs. 

The San Mateo Cup-Top weight 105 pounds; 2 
pounds allowed for each quarter-Inch under 14 
hands 2 inches; prize, cup presented by " r . f, 'ark; 

one-quarter mile. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 2, 1907. 



***** K->** * ■!■ ■*. .|. » »^ * » * » 4 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

Conducted by J. X. DeWitt 



+*********4>****^.+4m}.^...>.^^,j^3^.^^ 



PACIFIC COAST TRIALS. 



The Pacific Coast Field Trial Club s twenty-fourth 
annual trials were run near Bakersfield last week on 
grounds familiar to most of those present. Weather 
conditions, with the exception of thick fogs for three 
mornings, were excellent. Birds never were more 
plentiful in the various sections of the Kern County 
Land Company's domain, over which the trials were 
run. Cover conditions were varied and favorable 
enough to suit the most enthusiastic field trial de- 
voice. 

The Derby did not produce the goods that was an- 
ticipated, but at that there was enough satisfactory 
results to dissipate any signs of disappointment 
among the most sanguine. The Derby entries were 
not by far up to the number of starters that we have 
had for several years past. Distemper in the strings 
of nearly all of the handlers cut down materially 
the entry of young dogs. A copious rainfall in the 
Bakersfield country during the six weeks prior to 
the trials also militated against full time in training 
the Derby candidates. Several of the dogs in the 
Derby had only recently gotten over an attack of 
distemper. Shasta Daisy, in particular, showed the 
effects of her sickness, but proved herself a re- 
markably game little bitch. Colton was another one 
of the convalescents. Taking everything into con- 
sideration, the various setbacks our sportsmen have 
had during the past year, the club is to be congratu- 
lated on having a fairly successful Derby. 

Tiburon, the winner, is a stylish, handsome little 
bitch, only ten months" old. She will do far better 
at the next meeting she runs in. Shasta Daisv did 
remarkably well considering her handicap. She was 
a winner in trials at British Columbia and Washing- 
ton last fall. Colton is a very good looking Pointer, 
full of class, a consistent performer and a knowing 
dog. But he has not the speed of the Setters. He 
was placed a winner last fall in an Eastern field 
trial Derby. Ventura is a nice dispositioned bitch, 
whose work is classy and honest throughout. She 
will develop greater speed and range later on. At 
that she has a very merry way of working. 

The All Age stake, taken altogether, produced a 
general average of pleasing quality. Most of the 
starters had the benefit of prior experience. Petron- 
ella has repeatedly won in past trials and is a hard 
working, thoroughly reliable bitch. Keepsake is a 
well known winner, and McCloud Bov has had a 
varied experience East and West. Ramona has a 
bright field trial future before her. 

Belle Fontaine, winner of the Members' Stake, is 
a very handsome bitch and a snappy performer. 
Terry's Lady has made her mark in past trials, but 
was by no means in the best condition for this event. 
Lady Belle enhanced the good opinions she created 
when she was placed in the 1906 Derby. 

Mr. Jos. E. Terry announced on the evening of the 
Derby drawing that besides the purses in the three 
stakes, the following gentlemen had donated cups: 
E. Courtney Ford, W. J. Roberts and E. N. Briggs 
for the Derby, and Hon. H. W. Keller, Elmer E. 
Cox and Jos. Terry for the All Age. John Schu- 
macher and two other gentlemen donated the cups 
for the Members' Stake. 

At the annual meeting Wednesday nighi the fol- 
lowing officers for the ensuing vear were elected- 
President, Hon. H. W. Keller, Santa Monica; first 
vice-president. J. E. Terry. Sacramento; second vice- 
president. Elmer E. Cox, Madera; secretary-treasurer, 
Tudor J. A. Tiedemann; executive committee, Hon. 
C. N. Post, Sacramento, H. L. Betten, Alameda. E. 
Courtney Ford, San Francisco, and John Schumacher. 
lx)s Angeles. 

The following new members were elected: Dr. 
Fred P. Clark, Stockton; F. W. Kiesel, Sacramento; 
J. W. Considine, Seattle; Arthur Nicolls, Chico; E. 
Courtney Ford and Victor Caglieri. San Francisco. 

In future trials of the club retrieving will be re- 
quired in every event save the Derby. The next 
annual trials will be held the last full week of 
January, 1908. 

Mr. E. Courtney Ford purchased Tiburon, the 
winner of the Derby. Mr. Ford owns Belle Fontaine, 
the dam of Tiburon. McCloud Boy was purchased 
by Mr. John W. Considine. 

Among those in attendance were: J. E. Terry, Hon. 
C. N. Post of Sacramento. Elmer E. Cox, W. J. Rob- 
erts of Madera. H. L. Betten of Alameda, Victor 
Caglieri, Albert Betz, Frank H. Jermyn, H. T. Payne. 
P. D. Linville. E. N. Briggs, J. W. Flynn, E. Court- 
ney Ford, T. J. A. Tiedemann, J. X. DeWitt, W. E. 
Chute. John Cadman of San Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clem Wilson of Bakersfield, Dr. R. M. Wvman of 
Santa Clara. Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Tevis, Master Lloyd 
and Will Tevis, Duane Hopkins of Stockdale, Rev. 
Mr. Morgan of Bakersfield, Hon. H. W. Keller of 
Santa Monica, Frank G. Schumacher of Los Angeles, 
J. W. Considine of Seattle, Jos. Watkins. R. J. Ryan 
of St. Louis. R. Galloway of Bakersfield, H. F. El- 
liot of San Francisco, C. H. Davis of Saginaw City, 
J. O. Sims, Arthur Nicolls, Dick Bernard of Chico, 
Handlers Chas. H. Babcock, John E. Lucas. Fred 
Lucas. W. B. Coutts, Fred Coutts, R. M. Dodge, S. 
N. Carlile, Wm. Phillips of Kenicia. Allan Mc- 
Dougall of Pleasanton and others. 



The Derby. 

Monday, January 21, 1907. — A heavy fog which 
bung over the valley until middle forenoon delayed 
the starting of the Derby until 10:35, when the first 
brace was cast off in section 17. The entire country 
around Bakersfield is laid out like a checker-board 
and is designated by section corners. Section 16. 
the starting point of several previous trials, was 
originally selected as the initial ground for the 
trials, but a shift was made to section 17, a mile 
to the west, whilst the party were waiting for the 
fog to lift. 

Dan Daniels-John. — Dan Daniels, handled by W. 
B. Coutts, and Dr. S. A. Parker's Pointer, John, 
handled by S. N. Carlile, were cast off at 10:35 on 
a southwest course through a sparsely wooded 
country. Birds were found within two minutes, but 
neither dog showed over ordinary abilities. Going 
by and into the open ground, John flushed a bevy 
and numerous single birds were raised by the 
handlers and vehicles following. Dan spied and re- 
trieved a crippled bird. Both dogs made false points 
on ground where the bevy had been found. The 
dogs were both rather green and made a coursing 
match out of splendid opportunities for bird work. 
Neither dog was under the best of control. At 10:50 
the sun lifted the fog thoroughly. Ordered up at 11. 

Dock-Sadie B. — At 11:07 the second brace were put 
down. Doc. a Pointer owned by Mr. Phillips of Por- 
terville and handled by S. N. Carlile, with Sadie B., 
and English Setter, belonging to Hon. H. W. Keller 
of Santa Monica, and in charge of R. M. Dodge. The 
dogs were sent away on new ground in the open 
stubble of section 8, north of 17. The course was 
around the field so as to work the birds back into 
section 17. As the sun became stronger the birds 
laid better. Both dogs overran and flushed birds. 
The Pointer showed the best range and pace and 
did bird work enough to gain a credit of two points. 
Sadie B. was not steady to gun fire. The general 
work of the pair, however, was better somewhat than 
that of the first brace. Up at 11:30. 

Colton-Lemonade. — The third pair, put down at 
11:45. were the Pointer dog Colton, owned by Howard 
B. Smith of Colton. in charge of Charles H. Bab- 
cock. and Jos. E. Terry's English Setter Lemonade, 
Fred Coutts handling. This brace also started in 
section 17, on open ground. Both went off at a merry 
pace, the Pointer showing wider range and greater 
speed than the Setter, which had a fancy to come 
in to the handler at times. The Pointer had recently 
recovered from an attack of distemper and ran 
through cover where birds were laying close. In the 
southwest quarter of section 17. where a big bevy 
of birds were located in open ground. Colton roaded 
and pointed a bird and was steady to shot. The 
Setter pointed four singles, but flushed her birds. Up 
at 12:20. 

Ventura-Tiburon. — After luncheon at the Gosford 
ranch-house the fourth pair were put down at 2:05 
in open ground in section 20. on an easterly course. 
They were the Setter bitch Ventura, belonging to 
W. G. Kerchoff of Los Angeles, handled by John 
Lucas, and W. B. Coutts' English Setter Tiburon, 
handled by the owner. Both dogs proved stylish 
and merry workers, with good range and pace. Ven- 
tura could not withstand the temptation to chase a 
jack rabbit for nearly a mile, and after coming in to 
Lucas kept up, notwithstanding her long chase, the 
same lively clip. Both dogs missed some good op- 
portunities of bird work among the willows and 
along the banks of a dry slough. Ventura pointed 
a single and then dropped to flush. Tiburon next 
pointed and was steady to shot and wing. Both dogs 
did better work on birds among the scrub oaks. 
Both dogs gave evidence of pleasing working abili- 
ties. Each flushed birds and ran over birds, but at 
that, their work was very promising. Tiburon had 
the Dest of the heat. Up at 2:40. 

Sensation-Carmen. — The next brace were cast off 
at 2:48, also in section 20. They were two English 
Setters, Sensation, owned by Elmer E. Cox of Ma- 
dera, handled by W. B. Coutts, and Carmen, owned 
by Victor Caglieri of San Francisco, and in charge 
of Lucas. Both dogs were fast and wide rangers 
and had pleasing style. Shortly after starting Car- 
men made a wide cast to the east, disappearing in 
thick cover. She was lost for ten minutes, but 
finally came in at a merry clip. Carmen pointed 
several singles among the willows and was steady 
to gunfire and wing. Both dogs flushed and ran over 
birds several times. Carmen had the best of the 
heat, however, and was staunch to flush by handler. 
Her speed was excellent after the return from the 
jungle. Ordered up at 3:30. 

Shasta Daisy-Flora. — Daisy, owned by J. E. Terry, 
handled by W. B. Coutts. and Flora, owned by Clem 
Wilson of Bakersfield, Carlile handler, both English 
Setters, were cast off at 3:50 in section 21 on a 
southeast course. Both dogs had the pace, range 
and style that promised an interesting heat when 
birds were located. This hope was not realized. 
Flora was lost shortly after the start and the heat 
was finished by Daisy. Daisy had the honor of ac- 
cepting the first chance offered her, which was a 
bevy point in the open ground. She was the only 
dog that found a bevy during the day and that took 
advantage of first birds found. She afterwards on 



the same ground came into the prettiest and snap- 
piest points of the running, but this work was all 
on foot scent where the large bevy had been running. 
She afterwards missed grand chances on singles, run- 
ning through where birds were thick and flushing 
right and left. Daisy had recently gone through 
a hard siege of distemper, which probably accounted 
for her poor nose work. Taken up at 4:35. They 
were out 45 minutes. The delay was caused by wait- 
ing for the straggler, who was not found until late. 

Moxetta-Veronica. — The last pair for the day were 
sent away on a southerly course in section 21, on 
favorable grounds. Moxetta, owned by Sidney Smith, 
in charge of Fred Coutts, with Veronica, owned by 
Hon. W. Keller, Lucas handler. Both are English 
Setters, stylish and fast, and gave the spectators 
the impression that the heat would be a fine one, but 
again they were disappointed. Moxetta spied a mule- 
eared jack rabbit on the sward and off she went after 
the bunnie at headlong speed, nor did she show up 
again during the heat, which was finished by 
Veronica, who was run alone and proved herself a 
merry, stylish worker, with the pace and range that 
is desirable. She soon found birds both in open 
ground and among the scrub oaks and willows. She 
made several staunch points and was steady to 
flush. 

After consultation in the evening the judges de- 
cided to carry the following dogs into the second 
series: Veronica with Shasta Daisy, Ventura with 
Moxetta, Colton with Carmen, Dock with Tiburon. 
Reserve brace, Flora with Sensation. 



Tuesday, January 22, 1907. — Foggy conditions this 
morning again delayed an early start. Ariving at 
the rendezvous at section 16 a change of base was 
made to an open field east of the Canfield school- 
house, some ten miles southwest of Bakersfield, 
where the first brace in the second series were put 
down at 11:10. 

Shasta Daisy-Veronica. — Off on a northwest course, 
both dogs showed decided improvement in range 
and speed, quartering in workmanlike style and evi- 
dently keen to find. Veronica worked through low 
cover, from which a a bevy had flushed and took 
refuge in nearby trees. The cavalcade made a de- 
tour for the purpose of driving the birds back to 
the open fields again. Daisy nailed the first point 
on the edge of the corn-stubble and followed with 
a single in a dry ditch. Veronica had meanwhile 
picked out her ground, off the course a bit to the 
northeast, an alfalfa field, to which a few birds had 
flown. Daisy, handled by W. B. Coutts, went on 
ahead, finally locating a bevy and following with 
a single. She made another pretty point, but her 
handler failed to flush. Lucas meanwhile went after 
Ronie. Daisy was steady and under good control. 
Up at 11:30. 

Ventura-Moxetta. — Cast off at 11:38 in the open 
cover of the school-house field. Moxetta was de- 
cidedly steadier than on the previous day. She 
ranged far out with fair speed, but apparently did 
not apply herself to hunting for birds to a marked 
degree. Going through the adjoining alfalfa field 
she ranged well ahead of the course, finally running 
into and flushing half a dozen birds marked down by 
the spectators, she then gave chase. She is a good 
looking, green young one, but promising withal under 
further tuition. Ventura worked intelligently, get- 
ting two pretty singles, to which she was steady. 
She always dropped to shot and flush during her 
heats and was under excellent control. Up at 12:10. 

Colton-Carmen. — Down at 12:25 in the field across 
the road from the school-house, open cover and 
scattered trees, near the road. This ground had 
furnished birds heretofore, but a circuit of the low, 
open cover drew blank, the first heat in the Derby 
that failed birds. The contrast between the Setter 
and Pointer was noticeable. Carmen is a slight 
built, handsome bitch, weighing less than 30 pounds. 
Notwithstanding she is classy and possesses stamina 
and speed that should make her a dangerous* con- 
tender when matured. She is a wide ranger and 
keen bird hunter, but must be under better control 
of the handler before she will be seen at her best. 
Ordered up at 12:45. 

After an appetizing lunch at Gosford ranch, a drive 
to section 20, about two miles away, where the fourth 
brace of the second series were cast off at 2:15. 

Tiburon-Dock. — The pair were sent away on the 
same ground and course over which they went the 
day before. Tiburon showed conclusively that he 
has the pace and range desired. He worked merrily 
and stylishly, making wide casts and quartering his 
ground speedily. He was far steadier and under bet- 
ter control than in his earlier heats. Working 
south into heavier cover and through the scattered 
willows. Tib soon located birds, for a bevy point 
followed by four singles in short order. He was 
staunch and steady to wing. He also made two 
points on singles after Lucas was ordered to take 
him up at 2:45. This showing created the impres- 
sion among those who were the observers that Tibu- 
ron was within hailing distance of first honors. Dock 
got away from the course early in the heat and dis- 
appeared in the heavy brush to the southwest. 

Sensation-Flora. — The reserve brace were put down 
at 2:50 and ran twenty-five minutes over the same 
ground as the previous brace. Flora, who bolted 
the day before, proved to have a fund of speed 
and staunchness; she went away on wide casts and 
tried to find birds. Sensation also gave a better per- 
formance than in her first heat. The heat was over 
ground that proved barren of birds. 

After a short consultation the judges decided to 
run the following dogs in the third series: Colton 
with Shasta Daisy, Carmen with Tiburon, Ventura 
a bye. 



Saturday, February 2, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



Shasta Daisy-Colton. — Cast oft at 3:55 in open 
cover a quarter of a mile east ot where the last 
brace finished, and worked to the northwest into 
scattered willows and cottonwoods. Daisy outspeed- 
ed and outranged the Pointer and found "birds, mak- 
ing two staunch points. Once Daisy pointed. Colton 
backed, the dogs not being two feet apart. Ordered 
up at 4:05. 

Tiburon-Carmen. — A shift was again made to sec- 
tion 20. southwest of Gosford station, where Car- 
men and Tiburon were put down at 4:25 and sent 
away to the southeast over open low cover leading 
up to scattered trees, ground familiar to both dogs. 
Shortly after starting Carmen got off course in high, 
thick cover and did not turn up again, being lost 
for the time being, despite a close search by Lucas 
and others. Tiburon continued on through the 
trees and into open ground, working merrily and 
stylishly, making two staunch points and being 
steady to gunfire and flush. Up at 4:50. 

Ventura, a bye. — The Derby was finished by Ronie, 
cast off at 5 o'clock, in good cover, interspersed with 
cottonwoods and willows, ground that had been 
worked earlier by the other dogs, and into which 
the birds had taken refuge again. She found birds 
and pointed staunchly. Her work was very Clevel- 
and consistent. She had speed and range and paid 
strict attention to business. She ran fifteen minutes 
and was ordered up. 

The judges, after brief consultation, then an- 
nounced the winners as follows: Tiburon first. 
Shasta Daisy second. Ventura and Colton equal third. 
Summary. 

Bakersfield. January 21. 1907— Pacific Coast Field 
Trial Club's twenty-fourth annual Derby stake, open 
to all Setters and Pointers whelped on or after Janu- 
ary 1st, 1905. Purse $280—50. 30 and 20 per cent. 
(Forfeits retained by the club). First forfeit $5, 
second forfeit $5, $10 additional to start. Cups to 
winners. Fourteen starters (10 English Setters, 4 
Pointers). Judges. Hon. Chas. X. Post. Sacramento; 
Henry L. Betten, Alameda: Tudor J. A. Tiedemann. 
San Francisco. 

T. 

Dan Daniels, white and liver tieke:l Pointer dog (Dr 
Daniels-Fango), W. B. Coutts. owner and handler, 
with 

John, white and liver Pointer dog (Rip Rap's Sport- 
Miss Porterville), Dr. S. G. Barber. Porterville, owner. 
S. N. Carlile. handler. 

Dock, white and liver Pointer dog (Rip Rap's Sport- 
Miss Porterville). owner: S. N. Carlile. handler, 
with 

U e B - wlli,r --' "lack and ticked English Setter bitch 
(Sir Roderiek-Sombra). Hon. H. W. Keller. Santa Mon- 
ica, owner: R. M. Dodge, handler. 

Colton. white and liver Pointer dog (Dr. Daniels- 
Lottie Ripstone). Howard R. Smith. Colton. owner; C 
H. Babcock, handler, 

with 

Lemonade, white and lemon English Setter bitch (Ch 
Kilgarif-Belle Fontaine). Jos. E. Terry. Sacramento, 
owner; Fred Coutts. handler. 

Ventura, white and lemon English Setter bitch (Harry 
H.-Peachmark II.), W. G. Kerchoff. Eos Angeles own- 
er; J. E. Lucas, handler. 

, with 

Tiburon. white, black and ticked English Setter Pitch 
(l ncle jimmie Wbitestone-Helle Fontaine) W B 
Coutts, owner and handler. 

Sensation. white, black and blue belton English 
Setter bitch (Ch. Kilgarif-lone S. ). Elmer E Fox Ma- 
dera, owner; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

W i t il 

Carmen, white, black and ticked ICnglish Setter bitch 
(Counts Mark-Amanda), V. Caglieri, San Francisco 
owner; Lucas, handler. 

Flora, white and orange English Setter bitch (Sir 
Roderick-Sombra). Clem Wilson, Bakersfield owner- 
Carlile, handler. 

witli 

Shasta Daisy, white, black, tan and ticked English 
Setter bitch (Ch. Kilgarif-lone S.), Jos E Terry Sac- 
ramento, owner; W. B. Coutts. handler. 

Moxetta. white, black and ticked English Setter bitch 
(Ch. Kilganf-Moxey Danstone), Sidney J. Smith, owner- 
Fred Coutts, handler. 

with 

Veronica, white, black, tan and ticked English Setter 
bitch (Counts' Mark-Amanda). Hon. 11. W. Keller Santa 
Monica, owner; Lucas, handler. 

II. 

Veronica with Sensation. 

Ventura with Moxetta. 

Colton witli Carmen. 

Dock with Tiburon. 

Flora with Sensation, reserve brace. 

III. 

Colton with Shasta Daisy. 
Carmen with Tiburon. 
Ventura, a bye. 

RESULTS. 

Tiburon first, Shasta Daisy second. Colton and Ven- 
tura equal third. 

All-Age Stake. 

Wednesday, January 23, 1907. — The draw for the 
All-Age on Tuesday evening had ten nominations 
and was as follows: Master Lloyd Tevis' Pointer 
bitch Margueretta with S. Christenson's English 
Setter Goliath; Wm. Dormer's English Seder Mari- 
posa with Stockdale Kennels' Pctronella; Califor- 
nia Kennels' English Setter McCloud Hoy with Cali- 
fornia Kennels' Setter Keepsake?; Jos. E. Terry's 
English Setter Ramona with A. Betz' English Setter 
Merry Dude; Frank G. Schumacher's Pointer bitch 
Lady Belle with California Kennels' English Setter 
Avalon. 

Mr. J. W. Flynn was substituted as one of the 
All-Age judges instead of Hon. Chas. N. Post, who 
was disqualified, be being the breeder of several of 
the dogs in the stake. 

A heavy fog and sodden cover conditions again 
retarded an early start. When the advance of the 
party met at the gate of section 16 about 8 o'clock, 
among them being Handler Lucas, they found Mr. 
Caglieri's game little bitch Carmen patiently await- 
ing, apparently, the advent of her friends. 

She was none the worse for being out all night in 
the open and had evidently, after failing to find her 
handler or master, when she discovered she was far 



away from friends, taken a course miles back that 
brought her to the starting point of Monday morning. 
The ground she was familiar with, and probably 
figured out would again be the assembling place of 
those she was in search of. If a dog's actions ever 
indicated extreme satisfaction in getting out of a 
dilemma, Carmen showed it when Lucas hove in 
sight. 

Continuing on to kill time until the fog lifted, a 
trip was made to the field west of the Canfield 
school-house, where at 10:55 the first brace in the 
All-Age were put down. 

Margueretta-Goliath. — Both dogs started off in 
good style. Goliath, handled by W. B. Coutts. made 
a wide cast to the northwest and after disappearing 
over a ditch embankment was not seen again until 
brought in by his handler at the close of the heat. 
Margaretla. R. M. Dodge handler, continued on 
course, working several fields, but failed to find 
birds. She proved to be a steady goer, quartering 
and working her ground well. The heat was over 
at 11:40. 

Petronella-Mariposa. — The second brace, Mariposa. 
P. D. Linville handler, and Petronella, were put 
down In a field across the road and south of the 
first ground worked. The dogs started at 12:05 in 
a vineyard and weed-covered section in which hogs 
had been foraging. The ground in consequence was 
believed by some to afford a poor prospect for re- 
sults. In fact. Dodge was much averse to going over 
it with his dog. Notwithstanding, birds were quickly 
located by the Pointer, which soon made a bevy 
point followed by three single points. She was at 
first a trifle unsteady and broke in once on shot, but 
her general average on bird work, pace, style and 
ranging was good enough to carry her into the sec- 
ond series. Mariposa made a bevy point in another 
field. He was a bit unsteady and not fully under 
control. He also refused once to honor a point by 
backing. His performance was not up to his show- 
ing when he ran in the Derby. Up at 12:45. 

McCloud Boy- Keepsake. — After lunch at the Gos- 
ford ranch a shift was made to section 21, about 
two miles away to the east. The third brace, put 
down at 2:30, McCloud Boy, Lucas handler, and 
Keepsake, handled by Babcock. Both were experi- 
enced field trial dogs pitted against each other. 
They started in open cover and circled around 
through trees, low cover and thick brush over a 
long course, both dogs keeping up a great speed. 
McCloud Boy is a wide-ranging dog of classy style. 
Keepsake, though not so fast, is also very speedy, 
nevertheless. Despite the untiring honest work of 
both dogs, the heat drew a blank, although a few 
birds were flushed by the pedestrians on ground 
the dogs did not go over. Ordered up at 3:10. 

Ramona-Merry Dude. — The fourth brace were put 
down at 3:25 in section 20, a mile to the west of 
the last ground worked. Ramona, W. B. Coutts 
handler, and Merry Dude, P. D. Linville handler, 
were sent away on a southerly cast over open ground 
that led up to scattered cottonwoods and bunches 
of brushy cover. The beginning of this heat de- 
veloped into a coursing match, both dogs chased jack 
rabbits. After coming in to the handlers they went 
away on wide casts through the sparse cottonwocds 
and willows, which ground the dogs quartered and 
worked without result. Taken over into a field to the 
southwest, birds were found among the trees anci 
rank grass cover and the best work so far of the 
meeting took place. Dude made a number of rapid 
snappy singles and was steady to gunfire and wing 
and also under good control. Ramona made point 
after point. The birds were so thick that the dogs 
were working independently of each other. Up at 
4:04. 

Lady Belle-Avalon. — The- last heat of the first 
series was between Lady Belle, W. B. Coutts 
handler, and Avalon, handled by Babcock. The dogs 
were put down at 5:15 in an open field south of the 
last worked ground. The two Setters went away on 
a speedy wide cast in a southeast direction. Avalon 
quartered in and came to a staunch ppint one-eighth 
of a mile away. Lady Belle came round and ac- 
knowledged by backing the Setter at command. The 
handlers, however, could not flush a bird. The brace 
worked ahead into brush and to the west into low 
cover. Both dogs failed to find birds, which rose 
from the weeds. Avalon was a bit unsteady to shot. 
Belle was staunch to several flushes. Crossing 
through the weeds into brushy cover, birds were lo- 
cated and Belle made several pretty points, being 
steady to shot and wing. Ordered up at 4:55. 

The judges in the evening announced the follow- 
ing dogs to run in the second series of the All-Age: 
McCloud Boy with Ramona, Keepsake with Pet ion 
ella. Reserve brace: Merry Dude with Lady Melle. 



Dodge kept her at work despite the request of one 
of the judges to bring her in on the regular course. 
She roaded the running birds for over a hundred 
yards and made four staunch points in quick order, 
being steady to shot and wing.. Keepsake made two 
neat points and was steady to gunfire and flush. Up 
at 10:50. 

Merry Dude-Lady Belle. — Ww ground I b 

for the heat between the reserve brace, and a move 
was made to the Canfield school-house field, three 
miles away. Merry Dude and Lady Melle woie cast oil' 
in low cover of the field back of the school-house. A 
run of ten minutes drew blank. 

The judges then announced the winning dogs as 
follows: Petronella first. Keepsake second. Ramona 
and McCloud Boy equal third. 

Summary. 

Bakersfield, January 23, 1907— Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-fourih annual AIL-Age stake, open 
to all Setters and Pointers not placed first at any 
previous trials. Purse $2(10 — 50, 30 and 20 per cent. 
(Forfeits retained by the club). 'Entrance $10, $10 
additional to start. Cups to winners. Ten starters 
(7 English Setters, 3 Pointers). Judges, Henry L. 
Betten, Alameda; T. J. A. Tiedemann, and J. W. 
Flynn, San Francisco. 

I. 

Margueretta. white and liver Pointer bitch (Cuba's 
Zep- Jingo's Bagpipe), Lloyd Tevis. Stockdale, owner; 
R. M. Dodge, handler, 

with 

Goliath, white, black and ticked English Setter dog 
!Cli. Kilgarif-Ch. Maggie F.). S. Ch l ist ervson. San Fran- 
cisco, owner; YV. II. Coutts, handler. 

Mariposa, white, black, tan and ticked English Set- 
ter dog (Detroit Joe-Countess Mark). Wm. Dormer, San 
Francisco, owner; J. E. Lucas, handler, 
with 

Petronella. white and liver Pointer bitch (Young 
Jingo-Florida), Stockdale Kennels, owner; Dodge, hand- 
ler. 

McCloud Boy, white, black and ticked English Set- 
ter clog (Tony Boy-Sadie Hopkins), California Kennels, 
owner; J. E. Lucas, handler, 
with 

Keepsake, white and black ticked English Setter 
bitch (California Bell Boy-Peach Blossom >. California 
Kennels owner; Chas. H. Babcock. handler. 

Ramona, white and black ticked English Setter bitch 
(Ch. Kilgarif-Bclle of the Ball). Jos. 10. Terry, Sac- 
ramento, owner; W. B. Coutts. handler. 

with 

Merry Dude, white and black English Setter dog 
(Fairland Dude-Merry Heart). A. Betz. San Francisco, 
owner; P. I). Linville, handler. 

Lady Belle, white, liver and ticked Pointer bitch 
(Teddy Kent-Jack's Fashion), Frank G. Schumacher, 
Los Angeles, owner; W. B. Coutts, handler, 
with 

Avalon, white, black and ticked English Setter dog 
(California Bell Boy-Peach Blossom), California Ken- 
nels, owner; Babcock, handler. 

II. 

McCloud Boy with Ramona. 
Keepsake with Petronella. 

Merry Dude with Lady Belle, reserve brace. 
RESULTS. 

Petronella first. Keepsake second, Ramona and Mc- 
Cloud Boy equal third. 



Thursday. January 24. 1907.— 

Ramona-McCloud Boy. — A slight fog in the morn- 
ing lifted early and at 9:30 the lirsl brace in the sec- 
ond series were put down on the northwest quarter 
of section 17. The course was south west over open 
ground. Ramona ran through a bevy, out of which 
she pointed a single. She; was unsteady at first. Hoy 
came to a staunch point, near the same spot and 
was steady to shot and wing. Ramona then snapped 
into a staunch point, which failed to produce a 
bird. She pointed again and was not steady to 
either shot or flush. Hoy nailed another point, 
Down 35 minutes. 

Petronella-Keepsake.— Cast ofl at 10:20 In the 
same section. Petronella did the work in this heat 
that won her first place. A tour of open and brushy 
ground over several fields was math? and finally in 
an orchard to the west on loamy ground Petronella 
found birds, although slightly off the course, Handler 



Members' Stake. 

After luncheon at the Gosford ranch-house the 
party proceeded to section 30, two miles southwest, 
where the Members' Stake was started on entirely 
new ground. 

Hon. H. W. Keller was substitute! as one of the 
judges in this stake in place of Mr. Flynn, who ran 
his dog Senator Don. In this event each dog was 
handled by the owner and retrieving was in order. 

Terry's Lady-Bay wood. — Put down at 1:45. The 
only retrieve made during the stake was by 
Terry's Lady, with Master Lloyd Tevis' Pointer Bay- 
wood. This heat covered quite a stretch of country. 
Lady improved a number of opportunities and did 
some clever work in finding and pointing, being 
steady and under good control. Boywood's principal 
performance during the heat was to raid a farmer's 
barnyard and come in to his handler with a white 
Leghorn chicken in his mouth. Not withstanding this 
fracture of field trial ethics, he did some creditable 
bird work. Up at 2:15. 

Belle Fontaine-Senator Don. — At 2:20 the third 
pair put down were J. W. Flynn's Pointer Senator 
Don with 10. Courtney Ford's English Setter Belle 
Fontaine. After ranging and quartering for about 
ten minutes the dogs found birds in dry grass cover. 
Helle came to point, but was a trifle unsteady. The 
Pointer backed nicely. Both dogs then pointed and 
were steady to wing. Belle again came to a 
staunch point close to where the first bird had 
flushed. Working the cover closely, she snapped 
into another point which Don properly honored by 
backing. Both dogs worked very prettily In this 
heat, the advantage being unquestionably with the 
Setter. Ordered up at 2: 15. 

Ch. Cuba Jr.-Buck. — For the next heal new ground 
was selected. A change was then made to section 
20, where Master Lloyd Tevis' Pointer Ch. Cuba Jr. 
was DOt down with 10. Courtuey Ford's English Set- 
ter Buck. The dogs started at 3:05 and worked 
open ground and low cover, finally getting into scat- 
tered cottonwoods. willows and high grass, where a 
large number of birds were; found. The birds laid 
close, giving both dogs many opportunities which 
were not used to the best effect. The dogs were 
not used to their respective juindlers, which no doubt 
accounted for faulty results. Nevertheless some 
very nice bird work was done. Two of the prettiest 
points of the trials were made in high grass by Buck. 
Cuba backed in proper form. Each dog proved 
Staunch to flight and gunfire. I'p at 3:30. 

Lady Belle, a bye. — The final heat of the slake 
and of (he trials was run by Frank G. Schumacher's 
Pointer Lady Helle. the bye dog, with T. J. A. Tiede- 
mann's English Setter Northern Huntress The pair 
were put down on the same ground at 3:30 and ran 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 2, 1907 



thirty minutes. The dogs worked ground already 
beaten by the previous brace, and which also was 
gone over by teams and pedestrians. Being carried 
over to an adjoining field to the west, birds were soon 
located. In short order Belle made a bevy point and 
two singles. Huntress kept pace with her running 
mate and also found a bevy. She roaded several 
birds in a very workmanlike manner and made a 
number of points. Both dogs backed each other re- 
peatedly and gave an exhibition of bird sense and 
scent work that proved to make up one of the pret- 
tiest heats of the trials. 

The judges then announced the winners as fol- 
lows: Belle Fontaine first, Terry's Ladv second, 
Lady Belle third. 

Summary. 

Bakersfield, January 24, 1907 — Pacific Coast Field 
Trial Club's twenty-fourth annual Members' stake. 
Cups to dogs placed one, two, three. Entrance $10. 
Seven starters (4 Pointers and 3 English Setters). 
Dogs handled by owners. Judges, Hon. H. W. Keller, 
Santa Monica; Henry L. Betten and T. J. A. Tiede- 
mann. 

I. 

Terry's Lady, white and orange English Setter bitch 
[Count's Mark-Peaehmark). Elmer H. Cox, Madera, 
owner, 

with 

Baywood, white and liver Pointer dog (Ch. Cuba of 
Kenwood-Petronella). Master Lloyd Tevis, Stockdale, 
owner. 

Senator Don. white and orange Pointer dog (Ch. Sen- 
ator P.-Flynn's Dolly Jingo), J. W. Flvnn, San Fran- 
ClflCO, owner, 

with 

Belle Fontaine, white and black ticked English Setter 
bitch (Count Whitestone-Gracie Gladstone), E. Court- 
ney Ford. San Francisco, owner. 

Ch. Cuba Jr.. liver and white Pointer dog (Ch. Cuba 
of Kenwood-Florida). Master Lloyd Tevis, Stockdale, 
owner, 

witli 

Buck, white anil black Friglish Setter dm; (Sir Mark- 
Iroquois Belle), E. Courtney Ford. San Francisco, owner. 

Lady Belle, white, liver and ticked Pointer bitch; 
(Teddy Kent-Jack's Fashion), Frank G. Schumacher, 
Los Angeles, owner. A bye. 

RESU LTS. 

Belle Fontaine first, Terry's Lady second, Lady Belle 
tin rd. 

O 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



At the recent Memphis bench show three good 
Hull Terriers faced the judge in the classes over 30 
pounds. The winner. Edgewood Duval, owned by 
Cr, H. Shaw, and brought out and handled by Frank 
Dole, America's premier handler of the breed, won 
first limit, open and winners. He is reported to be 
a good Terrier in head, eye and character, a bit 
too long in body is his only fault, if any. Mrs. 
G. E. Hoppe's Woodlawn Baron, put down in good 
shape but did not show well, took second to Duval. 
Cole's Flyer was third. In bitches, Mrs. F. F. Dole's 
Hope of Wonder was winners and first cpen in the 
heavy weights. She is said to be a Terrier of qualilv. 
Cole's Delcina, a light-weight, with a clean, long 
muzzle and sharp expression, was reserve winners. 

The win of Woodlawn Baron can be noted as a 
matter of congratulation to the owners of Stiletto 
Kennels. Baron was put in the show right after 
a six-day trip from the Coast, and under t.:-^ circum- 
stances made a very good win, for the Bull Terrier 
classes were strong in numbers, and E. Duval, who 
won over him, is a well known winner and seasoned 
bencher and was put down by Dole in as good con- 
dition as possible. Coast dogs are not doing so 
badly in the East. 



The report of the death of Mr. Jos E. Terry's 
two winning Derby dogs. Blue Belle and Shasta 
Daisy, was premature. Although both voungsters 
were down with a bad attack of distemper, thev 
were pulled through by W. B. Coutts. It was a 
close squeak, however. 



Mr. James Cole's well known English Setter bitch. 
Lady Cole, recently whelped a litter of five to Deo- 
dora Prince. Mr. Cole is in hopes that some, or all, 
of the litter will eventually mature into his idea of 
the combined field trial and show Setter. 



Something is coming off soon in Bull Terrier cir- 
cles that will be beneficial to Coast fanciers of the 
breed. 



Mr. Geo. B. M. Gray of Oakland recently pur- 
chased of Mr. Louis Contoit oi Mt. Kisco, New York 
the well known Irish Setter bitch. St. Lambert's 
Norah. He followed this up bv sending for St 
Cloud's Licarney, one of the Mt. Kisco sires. 

Indications are pointing to a long due awakening 
on the Coast to the value of this breed. There is 
a few good ones in Los Angeles, Ch. Shandon Ben 
at the head. In Stockton there is a grand dog, Jerry, 
that should prove a sire of degree. In Vancouver 
Mr. Johann Wulffsohn s Ch. Jeannot is a dog too 
good to be overlooked as a desirable sire. The 
Irish Setter has a stronger following in the North- 
west than prevails in this vicinity. 



The report is current at Arcadia, near Los Angeles, 
that Chine & Co., who own the coursing park, have 
made a sale of the entire property, a gentleman 
from Long Beach making the purchase. The ex- 
pense of operating the park has been quite heavy, 
and for a number of months it has been understood 
that Mr. Clune desired to unload. What is to be 
done with the property in the hands of the new pur- 
chaser is conjectural. It is generally thought that 



it means a clean-up of affairs from the conditions 
that have obtained in the past, and enclosed cors- 
ing in Southern California will be a thing of the past. 



Bloodhounds are in demand on the Cost, frequent- 
ly the kennel editor is requested to furnish the ad- 
dress of a breeder of Bloodhounds. We have at 
present a call for several dogs of this breed. Who 
has a Bloodhound for sale? 



Fifty dollars reward has been offered by the Hu- 
mane Society of Alameda County for the arrest and 
conviction of any person or persons who have been 
poisoning dogs in that vicinity recently. 



The San Francisco Kennel Club at a meeting held 
January 17th, decided to hold a big bench show in 
this city some time in the latter part of April or early 
in May. The show will be on a large scale and held 
in one of the new and spacious pavilions. 

It was decided to have Mr. Geo. Raper of England 
come over to judge all breeds. He has been here 
before and has always given the greatest of satis- 
faction. 



Pedigree Winners. 

One is often confronted with a dog's pedigree, 
which, if the aphorism that "like begets like" was 
always correct, would argue that the dog who owns 
the pedigree is beyond reproach. But it is too fre- 
quently the case that a dog whose line of ancestors 
were stars in the canine firmament — "pillars of the 
stud-book" is the usual hackneyed phrase — looks like 
an ordinary animal of the breed he more or less 
represents. Owners of such commonplace animals 




PETER J. HOLOHAN OF TWIN FALLS. IDAHO. 



Du Pont Representative in Idaho, Utah, Eastern 
Washington and Eastern Oregon. 



often think the prizes should be their properly, owing 
to their dogs having possessed a grandfather. Some- 
times they go beyond this thinking stage and ex- 
press their opinion on the subject. Referring to this 
matter a writer in the English press relates tne fol- 
lowing: "I remember an incident that happened 
many years ago at a Yorkshire show — Thorn or 
Barnsley, I am not certain which. The judge was 
the late George Hellivvell; the breed Collies, and up 
came an exhibitor who evidently was dead nuts on 
pedigree. 'Hi, mister, what's ma dog gotten?' 'What's 
tha noomber, lad?' returned George. So and so. was 
the reply. Turning over his book the verdict was 
soon found. 'Tha's got nought, nought!' 'Why, dost 
tha knaw ma dog's sire was sold for C750. and his 
granddam for £200?' 'Maybe, lad,' said the judge, 
then, becoming confidential, gave him the following 
advice — 'That enter again next year, and thee bring 
t' pedigree, but leave t' dog at home; pedigree's 
best part of him.' " 

o 

Fly Casting Club's Annual Meeting. 

The San Francisco Fly Casting Club will hold 
its annual meeting and banquet on Tuesday evening. 
February 5th, at Tait's. on Van Ness avenue. The 
dinner has been programmed to begin at 7 o'clock. 
There will be a large attendance of members and 
invited guests and some good things are promised 
in more ways than one. 



TRADE NOTES. 



Proved and Found Perfect. 

"Good Luck and U. M. C. Quality are friends," say 
the manufacturers of these excellent shells, and 
shooters who have tried all other makes find that 
they can improve their "Best Scores" with U. M. 
C. shells. 

Mr. W. H. Heer, shooting U. M. C. shells during 
the year just closed, scored 96.3 per cent of the 
11,055 targets shot at during the year, thus becom- 
ing the champion of 1906. Of the four high ama- 
teurs two used U. M. C. shells— Harry Taylor scor- 
ing 93.8 per cent out of 9,950 targets, and O. N. 
Ford 93.3 per cent out of 13,770 targets. The bril- 
liant showing of the year 1906 is backed by many 
records of past years, among which may be men- 
tioned the winning of seventeen Grand American 
Handicaps. 



Two High Grade Guns. 

Mr. E. Courtney Ford of this city recently received 
through Messrs. Golcher Bros., 511 Market street, 
two elegant shotguns from the Hunter Arms Com- 
pany, Fulton, N. Y. 

These guns are "A-2" grade and in every particu- 
lar are high class examples of the gunsmitns' art. 
One gun in a 12-guage Whitworth fluid compressed 
steel barrels, 30 inches, weighing 7% pounds, for 
trap shooting. The other is a 16-guage, same grade, 
26-inch barrels, weighing 6 % pounds, for field shoot- 
ing. Both guns are fitted with the Hunter single- 
trigger, automatic ejectors and straight, grips. The 
equipment of both guns is to be seen to be appre- 
ciated. The stocks "are elegantly worked and 
checkered, and splendid pieces of walnut. The en- 
graving on both fowling pieces is beautiful, in fact, 
the entire equipment of these guns is so choice and 
artistic that they have won the highest terms of 
praise from the lucky sportsmen who have seen and 
examined them. Mr. Ford showed his shotguns to 
the sportsmen at the recent field trials. One and 
all expressed the highest admiration for the guns. 
Mr. Ford is at present at San Diego on a quail hunt, 
and is thoroughly satisfied with the fit, balance and 
work of his guns. With the guns came a solid 
leather gun-case, well made and handsome — an 
article that .every possessor of a good gun should 
have. 



Peters Points. 

The indoor rifle tournament given by the Indiana 
State Rifle Association at Indianapolis on January 
1st proved a big success. About 200 men competed, 
and many excellent scores were recorded. When the 
results were all tabulated a very significant fact was 
developed, viz: that every prize in every match was 
won with Peters cartridges, nothwithstanding the 
fact that any ammunition was allowed, and several 
kinds were used. This is only one more link in the 
chain of evidence which has proven to a certainty 
thai Peters cartridges loaded with the famous Semi- 
Smokeless Powder are superior in every way to the 
ordinary black powder cartridges, and even pos- 
sesses many merits over smokeless ammunition. The 
most notable individual record made at the Indian- 
apolis tournament was that of Lieutenant H. W. 
MeBride, who not only led the team which won the 
Company trophy, but was high man in eight other 
matches, and second in two more. His work was all 
done with Peters ammunition, regarding which he 
is an enthusiast. 

The live-bird championship of Ohio. Indiana and 
Kentucky was won at Dayton, Ky.. January 1. 1907. 
by Mr. C. A. Young, using Peters factory loaded 
Ideal shells. Mr. Young scored 24 out of 25, with 
one dead out of bounds. 



Mr. W. F. Hillis, well known to Coast sports- 
men, the Peters representative here, has been in 
in this city on finite an extended visit recently. 



Find Out Mbout It. 

Prospective purchasers oi rifles should send for 
the circular issued by the Winchester Repeating 
Arms Company, which fully describes the Winches- 
ter Model 1907 Self-Loading Rifle, .351 caliber high 
power, "the gun that shoots through steel." This 
new- rifle, which has the tried and satisfactory Win- 
chester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge power- 
ful enough for the largest game. It is a serviceable, 
handy rifle from butt to muzzle. It is listed at $28. 
but the retail price is lower. It will certainly pay 
to investigate this gun. 

o 

Must Stand Trial. 

An order for the removal of William Binkley and 
Charles Purdy, charged with illegally killing elk 
in Idaho, has been issued, and United States Mar- 
shal Youngworth of Los Angeles left on January 
24th with the two men for Idaho. The men are 
charged with wholesale killing of elk in the vicinity 
of the Yellowstone National Park and with shipping 
a carload of elk trophies, valued at nearly $10,000, 
to los Angeles for sale. 

o 

At the recent annual meeting of the Oregon Fish 
and Game Protective Association the following offi- 
cers were elected: President, Ney Churchman; vice- 
president, W. P. Andrus of Hood River; secretary. 
A. E. Gebhardt; treasurer. H. S. Butterfield. Colonel 
David M. Dunne, Ernest House, Dr. Charles E. Stotle, 
Walter Beebe and W. C. Alvord were chosen mem- 
bers of the board of directors, of which the officers 
elected are ex-officio members. 



Saturday, February 2, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTS Ivi AN 



n 



!*» M"t"t"M ' » » t"M"M ' *** 

| THE FARM | 

COLONEL BRYAN'S HERD. 



There is, unmistakably, a great ad- 
vantage in polled cattle. They are 
not such a source of danger to kine 
and other stock as the horned sort. 
Dehorning can, of course, be resorted 
to, but the trouble would be obviated 
in brutes without horns by nature: 
and such are devoutly to be wished 
where delicately organized and nerv- 
ous animals like the Jersey are con- 
cerned. Is William J. Bryan going to 
bring about a revolution along this 
line that is more than a temi>est in 
a teapot? He has a beautiful home 
overlooking Lincoln, Neb., and news 
comes ever and anon that, like Clay, 
Jefferson and Washington, he delights 
in matters pertaining to agriculture. 
During the past few years he has se- 
cured several polled Jerseys and be- 
gun to build up a herd of them. When- 
ever a calf is born with horns he dis- 
cards it from the herd, being careful 
to select every promising hornless one 
for breeding purposes. In this way 
he expects to produce a high grade 
of polled Jerseys. Already he has 
eight very fine looking heifers and 
two bulls, none of which have even 
scars on their heads. 

If his herd can be built up this way 
why can not we have many others? 
Washington gave the great incentive 
to mule breeding in the United States; 
Jefferson improved on the plows in 
use in his day, and should Col. Bryan 
point the way to universally polled 
cattle, the gratitude of posterity would 
be his in a greater measure than if 
he carried to success some mere politi- 
cal idea. 

d 

NOTES ON FEEDING. 



Skim-milk, when not diluted with 
water, has a very narrow nutritive 
ratio. It should not be used as an ex- 
clusive diet for the brood sows or, 
as for that matter, swine of any kind. 

Oats at, say 35 cents per bushel, 
cost more after grinding than bran 
at $23 per ton, though they are not 
worth more for feeding purposes. 
They would, however, be a good com- 
bination with one-third peas. 

Mixed corn and oats in equal parts, 
feeding fresh cows about eight pounds 
per day, with all the hay each can eat, 
and a mess of roots two or three 
times a week, make a good ration. 

No one would expect to keep up a 
hard working horse on cornstalks or 
oat straw. The milking cow expends 
energy just as certainly as a horse 
that is working. Wherefore, though 
she may relish a little straw and the 
like now and then, she should not be 
compelled to seek such material ofr 
maintenance or for the production of 
milk and butter. 



-o- 



run down iii health, for he will find 
the loss comes back to him again in 
the weak calves, or that the cow the 
next time she is fresh will have fallen 
off enough in milk to make the ac- 
count even. The same thing is found 
when a herd is fed for the first time. 
The cows that respond the first are 
ofter the beef ones which soon drop 
out, while the dairy animal is stowing 
the fat inside on her ribs and making 
preparation in six months' time to be 
milkers. The demand for good dairy 
stock is increasing constantly and 
those who have a surplus can sell 
them to the dairymen around them 
and it will pay to keep up a young 
herd of growing animals so that they 
will always look good to buyers when 
they come around. One of the great 
drawbacks in this country is the scar- 
city of just such herds as these and 
it is time for a few of our breeders to 
begin turning them out as a business 
proposition. 



WEEDING OUT. 



Whether the cows are grade or pure 
bred, vigorous selection must still be 
practiced. In order to select intelli- 
gently it is necessary that accurate 
records be kept of the cow's perform- 
ance. We need not know what the 
herd averages, but we must be able 
to pick out the poor cows that are 
bringing the average of the herd 
down. A man says he knows his 
best cow wunout bothering with the 
milk scales and the Babcock test, but 
experience on trying both ways shows 
that he does not always know. Fre- 
quently the cow that he thinks the 
•best turns out the poorest, says Otto 
Irwin in Farm Star. 



o 

PURE WATER IN THE DAIRY. 



Twenty-five cows require 75 tons of 
silage to carry them through the sea- 
son. If fed during the summer, an 
added ton to the cow Is necessary. 

While sorghum fodder is much rel- 
ished by cows, still it will not compare 
with clover hay. The former contains 
but 1.5 pounds of protein to 100 pounds 
and the latter 6.8. 



A good illustration of the need of 
pure water in the dairy is afforded by 
experiments at the Iowa station on 
the quality of butter washed wun pas- 
teurized and unpasteurized water. In 
every case the butter washed with the 
sterile water kept better than the 
other. 

— o ■ 

No dairyman can afford to cut the 
food supply so short that his cows 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a 1U M A\ REMEDY for Rheu- 
matism, Spruing, Sore Throat, hi it 

is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caumtic Balaam sold Is 
Warranted to pive satisfaction . Price Wl.fiO 
per bottle. Bold by druggists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with foil directions for Its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 



$30,000 



The heifer you expect to turn into 
a good dairy cow should never be 
stunted in growth. 

o 

Breed your cows this winter and 
spring that they may be fresh between 
September and December. 

o — 

The coats and skins of cows are too 
generally neglected, but it is a mistake 
to use a currycomb at any time. 
o 

A calf dropped through the fall 
months will usually make better 
growtn during the year than a spring 
calf. 

o^ 

One night and day exposed in cold, 
wet weather will injure a cow more 
than t <iii nights in good quarters can 
repair. 

o 

No cow will yield a full flow of 
milk, no matter how well fed, if she is 
in any way uncomfortable — so, see 
to her comfort. 

o 

The dairy cows that get out only 
occasionally and only then to get 
muddy should be brushed regularly 
every morning. 

o 

The keeping of cows means reten- 
tion of soil fertility, the raising of 
maximum crops and prosperity for 
any farm community. 

o 

Unless cleanliness is observed in 
the highest degree, we admit hundreds 
of uncertainties in the manufacture 
of dairy products. 

As to wintering cows and other live 
stock, provide good shelter — much 
food is burned up within the animal 
for heat when left to the cold; feed 
regularly; give the right amount, so 
that nothing will be spoiled, and pre- 
pare the food in the best manner. 

FOB SALE. 

Bull Terrier dog; all white; six 
months Old; pedigree can't be beat; sire 
and dam both bench show winners. 1827 
Vallejo Street. 

PETErt SAXK & SON. 513 32d street, 
Oakland, Cat. Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers for past thirty years. All varie- 
ties Cattle. Horses. Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence R" 
licited. 



$30,000 



In Stakes and Premiums 

($17,500 FOR HARNESS HORSES) 

Petaluma Fair and Race Meeting 

August 24 to 3 1 inclusive. Harness Races August 1 9 to 24 

ENTRIES CLOSE MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1907 . 
The Largest Premiums for Horses, Cattle, Live Stock of all Kinds and Farm Products Ever Offered in the State Will Be Given. 

Programme Harness Races. Guaranteed Stakes. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 26th. 

2:14 Class Pacing $1,500 

2:17 Class Trotting 2,000 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27th. 

Three Year Olds Pacing $1,500 

Free for All Trotting 2,000 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28th. 

Three Year Olds Trotting $1,500 

Free for All Pacing 2,000 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 29th. 

Two Year Olds Trotting $1,500 

Trotters Without Records ~ 1,500 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30th. 

Pacers Without Records $1,500 

2:14 Class Trotting 2,000 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 31st. 

2:10 Class Pacing $2,000 

2:12 Class Trotting 2,000 



Only 2 Per Cent to Enter 

Entrance and Payments as follows: 2 per cent to enter, payable Monday, March 3, I !tf>7 ; 1 per cent additional If not declared out on or before May 1, 1907, and 
2 per cent additional if not declared out on or b -fore June 1, 190". Heclar ations (to declare out) must be made In writing and full amount due at the time the declaration 
is made, or nominator will be held for the full 5 per cent. 

SPECIAL NOTICE — The Petaluma track is one of the best, safest and fastest tracks in this part of the State. It will be put in excellent condition for harness 
races. The professional starter, Mr. H. E. Woods, has been engaged for the meeting and everything will be done to please the public and visiting horsemen and 
insure high-class racing. This fair and race meeting will be extensively advertised, excursions run at reduced rates and no effort or expense spared to make it one 
of the biggest fairs and race meetings ever held in California. For entry blank t, conditions and further information address the Manager, 



Member National Trotting Association. 



Harry Stover, Manager, P.O. Box 2, Petaluma, Cal. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 2, 190 



UAt AAitAAAAAAAtAiiAAA iAAAAAAitAAAtAtit AAAAAAM AAAiAAAAAAAAA ^AAAAtAAAAAAA AAiAiAAAi*AAA/»*AAAAiAAAAAAAAiAAAAAAAA 



"VOILA" 

American Association of Trotting Norse Breeders 

'Association of interests is imperative these days. Our breeding and horse interests need help. 

The Breeders' Association wants every breeder, large or small, every owner, every trainer or driver, 
I >r* j ional or amateur, and every merchant inter* sted in the welfare <>t our horse interests as members 

We stand for protection and help to our horse interests. For printed matter and further particulars 
please write 



J. W. Bailey 

President. 



H. K. Devereux, Secretary, 

322 Hickox Bldg., Cleveland, 0. 



MAKE WANTED. 

By McKInney, Zombro, Kinney Lou. 
Greco, Searchlight or Nutwood Wilkes, 
not to exceed seven years old, brown, 
bay or black; sound, good size and 
handsome; trotter with or without rec- 
ord; standard and registered. Answer 
giving full particulars and lowest casli 
price. 

P. W. KELLEY. 
Broader and Sportsman, 616 Golden 
Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

ALIX B., bay mare (record 2:24%) by 
Nutwood Wilkes (2:16%) and out of 
Alberta (by Albert W. 2:20). 

CARLTON W. GREENE, 
873 Eddy Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION FOB 
SALE. 

I have six thoroughbred stallions for 
sale at prices to suit purchasers of 
limited means. No breeder of harness 
horses can afford to go without a thor- 
oughbred horse on his farm for a brood- 
mare sire for getting fine mares for 
dams of high class roadsters. Address 
CAFT. T. B. MERRY. 

549 Grand Ave, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

FOB SALE OB LEASE. 

The well known stallion Milbrae 
2:16% and his two brothers. Portola 
and Menlo Boy. Milbrae is a handsome 
seal brown, 16 hands high and weighs 
1.190 lbs., a horse of excellent disposi- 
tion, splendid conformation and pos- 
sessed of great power and beauty. Mil- 
brae is sired by Prince Airlie, he by 
Guy Wilkes 2:15%, great grand sire 
Geo. Wiles 2:22, first dam Fearless by 
Fallis 2:23, second dam Jean Perault 
by Signal. For further information ap- 
ply to F. H. McEvoy, Menlo Park, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Effie Madison, 16 hands high, sound, 
can trot miles in 2:40, has good action, 
seven years old, a high-class mart. 
Sired by James Madison, first da;n 
Lady W. by Ophir. 

Also her two-year-old hay filly by 
Stam n., large sized filly and a good 
prospect. Entered and paid up on in 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes Nrt. 
r>, $7,000 guaranteed. Address Wm. E. 
DETELS, Pleasanton, Cal. 

WANTED — TO LEASE. 

A well bred McKinney stallion. Fifty 
per cent of net earnings to the owner. 
First class care taken of horse; can 
give best of references. Good field for 
well bred stallion. Address 
M. E. LEWIS, 
136 4th St., Eureka, Cal. 

FOB SALE. 
Chestnut filly KESBINA (two-year- 
old) by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Petrina 
• dam of Lady Petrina 2:27) by Pied- 
mont. This filly is very promising and 
Is entered and fully paid up in the 
I i iers' Futurity No. 5 and the Occi- 
dent Stake for 1908. Apply to 
S. T. CORAM, 

Centerville, Cal. 



Han. 
old. 
high, 
some . 
sound 
to get 
saddle hor.- 



a reasonab 
CLABX, Cont 



FOB SALE. 

some sorrel gelding, eight years 
Igha* 1050 pounds, 15% hands 
Hotter broken to saddle. Hand- 
ad and neck, stylish, absolutely 
in ! gentle. A rare opportunity 
'ass driving horse and 
ibined. Will be sold at 



Cal. 



Address W. S. 



PASTUBAGE. 

Fine pasturage; no wire fencing; 
good box stalls, and best of care given 
horses in any manner that owners may 
desire at reasonable rates. For further 
particulars address 

MBS. CHASE, 
Sonoma, Cal. 



FOB SALE. 

AGNES S., handsome brown tilly, four 
years old. sired by Scott McKinney, first 
dam by St. Patrick by Carr's Manibrino; 
second dam by Carr's Manibrino. With 
a double infusion of Carr's Mambrino. 
she should be a second Sweet Marie of 
1909. With very little work she has 
easily shown quarters in 34 seconds. 
She is absolutely sound, stylish, with 
good head and legs and is considered 
by all that have seen her to be as 
nice a mare as there is in the State. 
She will be sold at a reasonable price. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. Ad- 
dress C. A. STOBM, Box 633, Salinas, 
Cal. 

FINE BBED MABE FOB SALE. 

MISS DIRECT, handsome black mare 
by Direct 2:05%. dam Amy H. by Echo, 
son of Hambletonian 10; second dam by 
Langford, t horouglibred son of William- 
son's Belmont. A fine individual in 
every respect. Will be sold reasonable. 
This mare can be seen at Eagle 
Ave.. Alameda, and for reference as to 
her breeding and quality apply to Geo. 
A. Davis, Pleasanton, managed of 
RanCho del Valle. For price address 
MBS. M. E. HEWLETT, 2523 Eagle Ave., 
Alameda, Cal. Tel. Alameda 1G37. 

BELGIAN NOBMAN STALLION 
FOB SALE. 

HOLLAND JR., a magnificent young 
Belgian Norman stallion, four years old 
In March, jet black in color with small 
white spot in forehead. No other white 
marks on him. Stands 17 hands and 
weighs 1000 pounds. He is by King by 
Silver King imp., dam Hazel by Rolland 
imp. King weighed 1700 pounds; Hazel 
weighed 1700 pounds; Holland weighe 1 
2100 pounds. Holland Jr. will make a 
grand stock hors e. Price $1000. Ad- 
dress E. H. CHENEY, Bodega, Sonoma 
Co., Cal. 

FOB SALE. 

Large, well formed, handsome brown 
stallion. .1 years old. sired bv Ed. Mc- 
Kinney (full brother to Adam G. 2:11%), 
son of McKinney-Nona Y.. dam of four 
fast ones. First dam Donnatrine 2:26 
at 3 years (full sister to Listerine 2:13% 
and Athamax 2:22%); second dam Lus- 
trine by Onward; third dam by Chal- 
lenger: fourth dam by C. M. Clay Jr. 
22: fifth dam by Alex. Abdallah 15; 
sixth dam by Couer de Leon (Herr's). 
Good enough to head any stock farm: 
trots; will go fast if tracked. Served 
five mares last year, all in foal. Write 
for price. GEO. L. WABLOW, Fresno, 
Cal. 

FOB SALE. 
S1000 A MONTH FBOFIT. 

Livery stable business for sale, near 
San Francisco; thirty-five head horses; 
rigs and harnesses all in good condi- 
tion; clearing $1000 per month. 
For particulars address 

IBA BARKER DALZIEL, 
620 Octavia St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



The Standard Stallion 
OWYNEX 37626. 
For Sale. 

Owynex 37626 was bred at Oakwood 
Park Farm; is six years old; color, 
bright rich bay; stands 15.3: weighs 
about 1200 pounds; good disposition and 
conformation; stylish and a nicely gaited 
trotter. 

Owynex's record is 2:22, first half 
mile 1:08. He has been bred to a limited 
number of mares; his colts cannot be 
surpassed for color and conformation; 
all trotters. wB 

His sire, Owyhee 2:11, was one of 
the earnest and fastest stallions ever 
bred in California, sold to Australian 
parties for $5000; his dam. Inex, is the 
dam of Our Jack 2:13. To any one In- 
terested lull line of pedigree and price 
L. G. BONFILIO, 2019 
South Figueroa £>„., or Mr. W. G. BUB- 
FEE, University Station, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



"BAG LI/HIT" 1 

HAND LOADED SHELLS 

Our own make, and we're proud of them. 

Hand-loaded by our own experts. 

All the leading brands of powder used. 

If you want to strike the "bag limit" use our "Bag Limit" Hand- 
loaded Shells. 

BRITTAIN & CO. " 

Everything in Hardware 

Van Ness Ave. and Turk St. 



I 

J 



you receive letters 
having certain 
words or phrases so 
emphasized in red they 
stick in your memory. 
They are written on 

The New Tri- Chrome 
Smith Premier Typewriter 

The stenographer 
puts in the red letters 
as she goes along, by 
simply moving a small 
lever. 

This machine permits not only 
the use of a three-color ribbon, but 
also of a two-color or sinsle-color 
ribbon. No e*tra cost for this new 
model. 

The 

Smith Premier Typewriter 

Company 

1211 Sutter St. 
San Franciscc 



JERSEYS. HOLSTEINS AND DUR- 
HAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs, 
Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Nlles 
& Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



4 f 



Save=the= Horse" 

Registered U. S. Patent Office 

SPAVIN CURE 




Goffs. W. Va.. September 14, 1906. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 
Dear Sirs. — I completed the "Save-the- 
Horee" treatment sometime ago on the 
bone spavin. The lameness has disap- 
peared and has not returned. It was a 
very stubborn case, hut it yielded to 
the treatment. The best thing about it 
is there is no scar or blemish left. The 
spavin leg is as trim as the other. I 
was offered $30 for the mare before us- 
ing your treatment and have been of- 
fered $75 by the same man since using 
It. So you see ($5) made me $45. 

Yours respectfully, 

A. P. HATFIELD. 



Webburn, Sask., Can. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 
Gentlemen. — Enclosed find $10. Please 
send at once two bottles of Save-the- 
Horse Spavin Cure. I trained at Sac 
( ity. Ia.. last season and wrote yon In 
regard to using your remedy and the 
good results obtained. I always keep 
a bottle on hand. Yours, 

E. R. LESTER. 



"SAVE - THE - HORSE" permanently 
cures Spavin Ringbone (except Low), 
Curb, Thoroughpin, Splint, Shoe Boil, 
Wind Puff, Injured Tendons and all 
lameness, without scar or loss of hair. 
Horse works as usual. 

$5.00 FEB BOTTLE, with n written 
guarantee, as binding to protect you 
as the best legal talent could make it. 
Send for a copy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Formerly Troy. N. Y. 

D. E. NEWELL, 

56 Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



IMPORTED HACKNET STALLIONS 

At one-half other people's prices. If 
you want bargains write at once to 
R. P. STERICKER. West Orange, N. J. 



Saturday, February 2, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



L3 



A Guide to Horse Boot 
Buying— Free 



The latest and greatest improve- 
ments in xiorse Boots — the re- 
sult of two years' planning, as- 
sisted by the advice and ideas 
of the master reinsmen of the 
country — will be found in our 
new catalogue. It shows more 
new patterns and improvements 
than any catalogue ever pub- 
lished. We are making the only 
absolutely new and up-to-date 
line of horse boots on the mar- 
ket this year. Old styles and 
finish left far behind. Don't buy 
a dollar's worth until you see 
our new book. It's free. Write 
to-day. 




NOTICE THE SHAPE 

THE NEW "SELL" 

WIDE HEEL 
QUARTER BOOT 

] An improvement in construction 
thP f "ou have waited for a long 
ted and perfected 
a ' boot follows the 
natural lines of the hoof, fits 
closely and comfortably, and 
''vely will not rub, pinch, 
c_ _, bruise or injure the quar- 
ters or heels in any way. Our 
improved method of pressing 
makes the shape permanent, and 
it will outwear any other quar- 
ter boot on the market. Beware 
of imitations of this boot. 

EXAMINE THE CUT 

and consider the following points: 

AT A A the curves are made 
correctly, permitting the 
straps to be drawn tightly 
without pinching or chafing 
the quarters. 

AT B B the curves prevent all 
danger of bruising the heels. 

AT C we have cut away part of 
the boot to show our Improv- 
ed Metal Gore Support. It 
holds the boot in position and 
prevents the stitching from 
ripping at the gore, and posi- 
tively will not injure the 
horse's heels. 




OURNEWVW 
OFSEWING 
THE STRAPS 
ON THE WRAP- 
PERS TO PRE- 
VENT CHAFING 



ANOTHER IMPROVEMENT 

See how the straps are sewed 
to the wrapper of the leg boots. 
All straps are sewed to a sep- 
arate piece of leather which is 
securely stitched to the wrapper. 
"This prevents chafing and the 
straps will not pull off. Es- 
pecially goo J for boots with 
kersey wrappers. 

SELL BRAND 

Boots (formerly known as the 
Gilliam) are now carried in 
stock by the leading dealers in 
the West. For free catalogue 
address 

THE SELL HORSE GOODS CO. 
CANTON, OHIO. 




American Horse Breeder 

FUTURITY 



(FOURTH RENEWAL) 



PURSE 
$ 10,000 



$1 



NOMINATES 
A MARE 



FOR ENTRY BLANKS WRITE 

AMERICAN HORSE BREEDER 



169 HIGH STREET 



BOSTON, MASS 




The Second Semi=AnnualSale 

OF STANDARD BRED HORSES and REGISTERED DURHAM BULLS WILL BE HELD 

Thursday, February 28th, 1907 

AT THE CELEBRATED 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm, Danville, Cal. 



THEY COMPRISE — 

25 STANDARD BRED TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLIES, COLTS AND GELDINGS, by Chas. Derby 2:20, Bonnie Direct 2:05V4, 

Stam B. 2:1114, Nushagak 25939, sire of Aristo 2:0814, etc. 
15 THOROUGHBRED, CLEVELAND BAY, and well bred work horses. All halter broken. 

30 TWO-YEAR-OLD REGISTERED DURHAM BULLS, by King Spicy 2d 154525, Bessie's Marquise 205085, Humboldt 
Victor 3d 175071. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. Watch Breeder and Sportsman for further particulars. 

Louis Shaffer, Auctioneer Edward M. Humphrey, Manager 



The Benefit 



Of having many of his promising colts in the best hands, 
will always help 

"AXWORTHY" (3) 2:l5/ 2 

to maintain and increase his success as a sire of baby trotters 
of the highest class. He has had this benefit and we will 
continue it by our care in accepting bookings. 

S^ISS^ES? The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



VETERINARY 




ce 'Fl^EE 

Dr. 8. A. Tattle, a Teterlnary sur- 
geon of long experience has writ- 
ten a book entitled "Veterinary 
Experience" on the diseases of 
horses, giving symptoms and 
treatment In plain terms. It Is 
fully illustrated with diagrams 
showing the skeleton and clrcu- 
. latory and digestive systems with 
preferences that make them plain. 
'Tells how to buy a horse and 
know whetherit 13 sound or not. Every horse owner 
should have one. It is sent to any one. 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR 

Is the only guaranteed cure for Collo, Curb, recent 
Shoe Bolle and Callous. It locates lameness, relieve! 
and cures Spavins, Ring Bone, Cookie Joint*. Crease. 
Heel, Soretohee, Catarrh, etc. Send today ana get the 
book free and Information about Dr. Tuttlo's specifies, 
rattle's Elixir Co., 52 Beverly St., Boston. Hasp, 

Redington & Co., San Francisco. 
W. A. Shaw, 12i)!» West Washington 
Street, Los Angeles, Cal., Agents. 



AN INFLAMED TENDON 

NEEDS COOLING. 




TftfcylicKlti\ 

As they want it ^1 

COMPRESSED ' 

PURE-SALT BRICKS 
'n PATENT FEEDERS. 

fThe sane, economical, handy 
way of salting animals, 
i Ash. Dealers/. 
\\Yrife us for Booh. 
BILMONI5MEMIPPLY(0. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS- BROOKLYN, N.Y 



„q C0PA/8 4 



Will do it and restore the circulation, 
assist nature to repair strained, rup- 
tured ligaments more successfully than 
Firing. ,\i> blister, no hair gone, and 
you can use the horse. $2.00 per bottle, 
delivered. Book 2-C Free. 

ABSORBINE, JR., for mankind, S1.00 
bottle. Cures Strained Torn Ligaments, 
"aricose Veins, Varicocele, Hydrocele, en- 
larged Glands and Clcers. Allays pain quickly 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 
54 Monmouth Street Springfield, Mass 

For Sale by — 

Langley & Michaels, San Francisco. 
Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Western Wholesale Drug Co., Los 
Angeles, Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sac- 
ramento, Cal.; Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, 
Wash.; Spokane Drug Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

BLAKE, M0FFITT & TOVVNE 

Dealers In PAPER. 

No. 403 Twelfth St., Oakland 
Rlake. McFall & Co.. Portland. Oregon. 
Blake, MoIfU Sc. Towne, Los Angeles. 



ABSORB,™.^ 

CAPSULES 

Mid* 



z 



r «? 



PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY 

High Class Art 
— in — 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 

RUBBEROID ROOFING 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON ft CO., 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



VETERINARY DENTISTRY 

Ira Barker Palziel, formerly of 605 Golden 
Gate Ave., is now permanently located at 

620 Octavia St., San Francisco 

Between Fulton and Grove Sts. 
Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. 

Complicated cases treated successfully. 
Calls from out of town promptly respon- 
ded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL 
620 Octavia St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Special 2074 



RACING! 



New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Racetrack 



Six or more races each week day, rain 
or shine. 



Opening' Saturday, November 17. 

Races commence at 1 :40 P. M., sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12 o'clock, thereafter 
every twenty minutes until 1:40 P. M. 
No smoking In last two cars, which are 
reserved for ladles and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after 
fifth and last races. 



THOS. H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



Fred Mast Successor to Zlbbell ft Son 

THE AVENUE STABLE. 
672-680 11th Ave., one block north of 
Chutes. 

A nice line of New Livery; Large, 
Clean Box Stalls. Special attention paid 
to boarding high-class horses. Work 
horses for any business for hire at all 
times. All kinds of country horses for 
sale. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co.. San 
Mateo. 



u 



THE B REEFER 



AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 2, 1907. 



GREAT DISPERSAL SALE 



All the Horses Owned by the 

Estate of James Coffin, Deceased 

To Be Held 
Monday Evening, February 25, 1907 
At 7:45 O'clock 

At the New Pavilion of 

Fred H. Chase & Co. 
478 Valencia St. San Francisco 



This consignment is headed by the 
young Palo Alto bred stallion 

CASSIAN 2:29*6 
Son of Mendocino 2:19% by Electioneer 
anil Cressidu 2;lX'.z. by Palo Alto 2:08%. 

25 head In fan, 'wliieli were selected 
with great care by Mr. Coffin to establish 
a breeding farm. 

Horses will be at Sale Stables, SAT- 
URDAY, FEBRUARY 23d. 

Write for Catalogues. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 
478 Valencia 3t. San Francisco, Cal. 



A PEW OF THE GOOD ONES. 

Grace Kaiser, dam of Coney 2:02, Stipu- 
lator 2 • 1 1 Vi . McZeus 2:13, Grace McK. 
2:21% and grandam of Tidal Wave 
2:03. Stinted to Highland C. 

Carrie Malone, own sister to Chr.s. Derby 
2 20 and dam of Carrie B. 2:18, and 
Cassiar 2:22, and grandam of Pinkey 
H. 2:17M- In foal to Bon Voyage. 

Welladay 2:14, own sister to Chas. Derby 
and In foal to Bon Voyage (3) 2:12%. 

Admiral Togo (2) 2:29»4. One of the 
best prospects for a 2:08 trotter in 
America. Worked a mile in 2:15% 
last vear. Five years old, sound, level 
headed and a sure race horse. The 
talk of the track at Pleasanton. 

Grandly Bred Mares by McKinney, Zom- 
bro. Zolock, Cupid. Mendocino, Oro 
Wilkes and Secretary, in foal to high 
class stallions and their produce en- 
tered in rich stakes. 

Colts and Fillies by Kinney l,ou, Stain 
B , Dvnwood W.. Cassian. Zomhro. Zo- 
lock, ' and Lecco. Among these < are 
the great two-year-old fillies Grace 
Zolock by Zolock 2:05>,4 out of Grace 
Kaiser, noted above, and Rose Decco 
by Lecco 2:09% out of Rose McKinney, 
dam of Almaden (2) 2:22%. winner 
of Breeders' Futurity and Occident 
Stakes. 



Auction Sale of 50 Head of Horses 

Monday Evening at 7:45 

February 11, 1907 

At the most extensive market in the West and in the largest Sale Building In 
the city, with a Speedway where every horse can show what he can do. 

THE BEST COLLECTION OF ALL PURPOSE HORSES EVER OFFERED AT 
AUCTION. Stallions, Broodmares and Business Horses; Record Horses, including 
Queenie R. 2:12'.,, Lottie Parks 2:16 3 4 . Venus Derby 2:23 (been a mile in 2:16V£), 
Princess W. 2:29 1 4 , the best 2:15 class trotter ever passed under the hammer. 

Some sensational green speed that can step to the front going through the 
Park. The superb consignment from the Baywood Stud, San Mateo, of ranch-brel 
horses from Llano Seco Rancho, Butte Co., Cal., have been prepared for this sale 
at the Baywood Stud and are the best lot ever bred at this well known farm, com- 
prising Combination Horses, Park Teams, Single Horses and Business Pairs, all 
well broken and fit for present conditions. 

GET A CATALOGUE AT ONCE. 

Fred H. Chase & Co., 478 Valencia St. 



Near Sixteenth Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



WRITE TO-DAY FOR CATALOGUE. 



75 PER CENT ° f a11 Hor5e ^Tff.i 

USE AND RECOMMEND 



ners 



Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy 



SOLD BY 




W, A. Sayre...: Sacramento, Cal. 

R. T. Frasier Pueblo, Colo. 

J. G. Read & Bro Ogden, Utah 

Jublnvllle & Nance Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Tims. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

Wm. E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

W. ('. Topping San Diego, Cal. 

Main- Wine best er-Jepsen Co 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

HI Thornwaldson Fresno, Ca.l 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco. Cal. 

Jos. McTigue San Francisco. Cal. 

Brydon Bros..; Los Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Dings 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1219. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs., 418 W. Madison St., Chicago, III" 




TALLION OWNER 



, If In need of anything in the line of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printed. Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks, 
Si iliion Service Hooks, Horse Cut- in stoek and made from photos. 
Hoof I'ads of all kinds for ro:id or track, breeding Hobbles, Stallion 
Support-. I'i'egmitors and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : : 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St, CHICAGO. 



Wanted- 



AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS WANTED IN 
EVERY TOWN ON THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE 
"BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN" 



Horsemen Say It's Wonderful 

We are speaking of the series of surpassing speed records 
made by numbers sired by 

"McKINNEY" 2:11^ 

If you ''breed for speed'' that list deserves 5 minutes of 
your time. Shall we send it? 

E.«£fl l #£&. The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



JAMES A. GROVE 



(R. R. Syer, Atty.) 



WILLIAM G. TORLEY 



LAWRENCE STOCK FARM 

HIGH CLASS HORSES BOUGHT AND SOLD. BROOD MARES CARED 
FOR AND BRED ACCORDING TO INSTRUCTIONS 

Futurity Stake Candidates and Candidates for the M. and M. and C. of C. 
Stakes Developed. Patronage and Correspondence Solicited. 

LAWRENCE STOCK FARM, Lawrence, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



: 



AIR CUSHION 

No lameness 



RUBBER 
HORSE- 
SHOE 



They f il I with air at each step. 
That's what breaks concussion. 
That's whaf prevents slipping. 
Thai's whaf keeps the foot 

healthy. 
That's what cures lameness. 



PADS 

NoSllpping 



j |5EE 



THAT CUSHION? 



J Order through your horse-shoer 

\ Revere Rubber Co. 



1 



SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

Boston. San Frar.cisco 




Order 
by 

" NAME" 





No Breeder Can Afford 
To be Without It 

— Price Reduced 

$4 in Cloth $5 in Leather 

To Be Purchased From 
Foster & O' Rear, Ferry Bldg., San Francisco 
From The Author, Capt. T. B. Merry 
549 Grand Ave.. Los Angeles. Cal. 


The American 
Thoroughbred 


The Result of SO Years of Close Study 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 

Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. (".rove anil Baker Sts., just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 

Best located and healthiest stahle in San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand 
for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare 
horses for track use. Ladies can go ami return to stahle and not have their horses frightened 
by antos or cars. ^ ^ ^ — ■ i ■ 

San Francisco Riding Club 



ANNEX FOR DRIVING HORSES. 

55 Stalls on Ground Floor; 

5 Exits. Perfect facilities for safety 

and the proper care of Horses. 



OPEN FOR PUBLIC PATRONAGE. 
While this Stahle is under the Man- 
agement of San Francisco Riding 
Club, it is not exclusive for the use 
of Members. 



Apply for Further Information to SAN FRANCISCO RIDING CLUB, 
Seventh Avenue and C Street. San Francisco. Cal. 




Awarded Gold Modal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It im- 
proves and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers 
for it. Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food 
Co.. C. P. Kertcl, Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 




DISTEMPER GERMS DESTROYED. 

Craft's Distemper and Cough Cure so reinforces the natural 
germicidal elements of the blood as to promptly destroy germs 
of distemper and other infectious horse diseases. Prevents 
attack if used early. Quickly cures if disease Is established. 
Monev back if it fails. At dealers or sent direct, prepaid. 
50c and $1.00. Write to-day for "Dr. Craft's Advice," a free 
pamphlet. 

WEILS MEDICINE CO., 13 Third St., Lafayette, Ind. 
D. E. Newell, 56 Bayo Vista At., Oakland, Cal., Pac. Coast Agt. 



Saturday, February 2, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



IB 



:« ■$> $ .j. $ .♦. .j. .j, .j. ^. $ .5. .> .;. 



❖ 



THE 
NEW 



Best By Test 



DU PONT SMOKELESS 



Wins More High Averages Than All 

Other Powders Combined. 

Leading- professional and amateur shots use DUPONT SMOKELESS 

almost exclusively. 

Its UNIFORMITY, HIGH VELOCITY, AND EVEN PATTERN 
are the result of over ioo years 
EXPERIENCE IN POWDER MAKING. 



E. I. du Pont de Nemours Powder Company 

Portland, Ore., Berkeley, Cal., Seattle, Wash, 
and Wilmington, Del. 




ITHACA GUNS 



HIS Illustration shows our No. 7 $300 list gun. It is impossible to 
show by a cut the beautiful finish, workmanship and material of this 
grade of gun, it can only be appreciated after you have handled 
an>1 examined the gun for yourself. It is fitted with the best Dam- 
ascus or Whitworth Fluid Steel barrels, the finest figured Walnut stock 
that Nature can produce, is hand checkered and engraved in the most 
elaborate manner with dogs and birds inlaid in gold. Send for Art Cata- 
log describing our complete line, 17 grades, ranging in price from $17.75 
net to $300 list. 



Ithaca Gun Company - - Ithaca, N. 

Pacific Coast Branch, 1346 Park St., Alameda, Cal. 



Y. 



GUNS 



FRESH AMMUNITION 




Outing znd Rubber Footwear, (iood for Wet Weather and Down Town. 

Palace Hardware, 638 Market Street 

Main Store and Office, 458 Uoldcn (iate Ave., San Francisco 

Ross McMahon Awn tn a t nd co. 

AT THE OLD STAND 

Teamsters' Rain Goods, Bags, Tents, Awnings. Hammocks, Covers 
73 Market Street; San Francisco, Cal. 



SGOLCHER BROS. 



VV¥WVH , T?7TVTTTVV¥VVTyTV7TTVTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT' 



Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



Guns, Fishing Tackle 
Ammunition 
Sporting Goods 

51 1 Market St., San Francisco < 




Telephone 
Temporary 1883 



AAAAAAAA AAAAAAA AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAA, 




TakmltMffime 

[f you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
net promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, Windpuffs and 
Hunches which will nut yield promptly ami perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 



It lias saved thouxands of pood hoi-Hes f rom t tic jiimIiINt's 

car t and the broken-down norae market, Hr. O. B. pick- 
ma of Minneapolis Minn whoconduets one of th,i largest llver.v stulilrs In the Northwest, 
f "||,,„.,. r .ve'i>een lisle* Qulnn-s Ointment I or some t tin- i. in I with the greatest 
I t,,ki- I'llMBiirnln reroniineiidlng It to mjr friends. No horseman should be with- 
in hie stable K»r eurh-. .pilots, spavin,. wlndpulTs and all hunrhes It lis, no eaual." 
J Price »I.OC .per b.iila. Soldbyalldrugttlst. or sen thy n.all. Write us for circular., 

'■ ^Z'^AgT W. B. Eddy & Go., Whitehall, N. Y. 




Pointers and 

English Setters 

Trained and Broken 

Broken Dps* and Well Bred Poppies 

for Sale. Address E. VALENCIA 

212 North Brown St., Napa, Cal. 

FOR SALE — BOSTON TERRIERS. 

A few typical specimens; dark hrlndle; 

fun pedigree, e. i>. mendenhall, 

41 Clay St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 
TRICOLOR COLLIE PUPS t 

working stock. Sire Shadeland Random, 

Sir Jan. A. K. C. 100, 89B (son of Imp. 

Inverness Prince), random collie 

KENNELS, E. C Rand, Prop., R. F. D. 
No. 2, Box 116, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

BULL TERRIERS. — Pure white, hiph 
class puppies for sale, sired hy Wood- 
lawn Baron, a classy individual ami 
show winner, brother to the winner of 
first and specials at Bull Terrier Breed- 
ers' Show at Philadelphia (at which the 
hest in the world were shown). STIL- 
ETTO KENNELS, 225 Alcatraz Aronue, 
Berkeley, Cal. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 2, 1907. 



Fine 

Harness 



The Best Horse Boots 




Remington. 



Slide to Work 



AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 



with the left hand. Right hand pulls trigger. Recoil ejects, 
cocks and reloads. Solid breech protection against "blow- 
hacks." Safety just before the trigger finger prevents acci- 
dental discharge. Full line of Double Guns if you prefer. 
The Ideal Duck Gun — List Price. $40 and upwards. 
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, 
Sales Office, San Francisco, Cal. Factory, Illon, N. Y. 

Agency, 315 Broadway, New York City. 



♦Jwj. .J. »j. *j. .t^j. .j. *»♦ .t. ,♦. ^. ^.♦♦♦^mJmJv^. ,$*♦*. .Jm$» .j,^, .;. .♦. .J. .a 



WINCHESTE 

Model 1907 Self-Loading Rifle. .351 Caliber High Power. 





"The Gun That Shoots Through Steel" 



Standard Rifle, 20-inch round nickel steel barrel, pistol grip, stock of plain walnut, not checked, weight about 7 3 4 pounds, number of shots, six, LIST Price, $28.00 

This new rifle, which has the thoroughly tried' and satisfactory Winchester self-loading system, shoots a cartridge powerful enough for the largest game. The 
soft point bullet mushrooms splendidly on animal tissue, tearing a wide, killing path. With a metal patched bullet this rilie will shoot through a 'A-inch steel 

nli t o Tli/i TVl^.i^l i fiAT i mm _ _ i . _ _ -i .»_-._ > , • ah a _i _» j i _ . it. ; — L i , l , , liondu criirt Trnm 



plate. The Model 1907 is a six-shot take-down, handsome and symmetrical in outline and simple and strong in construction. It is a serviceable, handy gun from 
butt to muzzle. There are no moving projections on the outside of the gun to catch in the clothing or tear the hands, and no screws or pins to shake loose. It is 
easily loaded and unloaded; easily shot with great rapidity and easily taken down and cleaned. List price. $28.00. The retail price is lower. Ask your dealer to 
show you this gun. Send for circular fully describing' this rifle. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Smith Hammerless andEjectorGuns 



Also Hunter One Trigger 




Won This Year's Grand 

American Handicap 

268 Competitors 

Also Won Grand Eastern 
Handicap 

(Hunter One Trigger) 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 




Hunter Arms Co., - - Fulton, N. Y. 
PHIL. D. BEKEART, CO., Inc. 

Temporary Office: No. 1346 Park St., ALAMEDA, Cal. 
(Pacific Coast Branch.) 
A. J. Reach Co., Ithaca Gun Co., Smith & Wesson, E. C. Cook & Bro., 
Marlin Fire Arms Co., Markham Air Rifle Co., Daisy Mfg. Co., Ideal Mfg. Co., 
Bridgeport Gun Implement Co., Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works Ham- 
ilton Rifle Co. 



THE OLD RELIABLE 

PARKER GUN 
in the hands of J. E. Cantelon 



Won the 

GRAND 

CANADIAN 

HANDICAP 

At live birds. 




At Hamilton. Out.. Jan. 16, 1907, J. E. Cantelon of Clin- 
ton, Ont., again demonstrated the reliability of the Parker 
Gun by winning with a straight score from the 30-yard 
mark. Send for catalogue. 

PARKER 

N. Y. Salesroom: 32 Warren St. = 



BROS. 

30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 



.THESE ARE THE BRANDS OF... 



Selby 



FACTORY 
LOADED 



Shells 



Pacific==Challenge==Superior==Excelsior 

VALLEJ0 JUNCTION, ■ CONTRA COSTA CO., CAL. 



2 



THE BR EEDER AN D SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 9, 1907. 




ALA ma 2:27'4. l>r. m., foaled 1900; winner of first prize and sweepstakes at the Montana State Fair, 1904; four firsts, Champion and Grand 
Champion at Lewis and Clark Live Stock Show; sire, Alfonso 2:29%, 9700; dam Lavina 2:28; second and third dams great brood mares; has 
trotted full miles In 2:15 and will trot in 2:10 or better, and Is a sure race horse, a grand roadster, finely bred and will make a choice brood 

mare. 

mirza 2:2834, br. g., foaled 1901; winner of first premium at Lewis and Clark Live Stock Show; sire Alfonso 2:29%, 9700; dam Mistral, dam of 

three better tHan 2:20, etc.; has shown trials in 2:20 and should trot in 2:10 and is a sure race horse. 
ALAMA and MIRZA, as a team, won first premium in Roadster Class, horses alone considered, at Pasadena in 1906, etc. They are city broke, 

square, pure-gaited trotters with fine action, very handsome and stylish and very desirable in every respect and will be a joy and comfort 

to their owner. They can be seen at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, with Mr. I. C. Mosher, who has been handling them for the past year, 

and who will show them and answer all inquiries. 



C. X. LARRABEE, 88 THIRD STREET, PORTLAND, OREGON 



Bon Voyage 



Highland C. 



Champion 2 year old Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 year old Stallion of 1950 

Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Record . . . .2:12% 

Timed in a Race 2:10% 

WINNER OF HARTFORD FUTURITY (38500) FOR 1905. 

. ?9?„ VOYA( F (3) 2:12% ls by Expedition 2:15% (sire of Biflora 2:09%. Ex- 
ton 2:10% and 50 others in 2:30 list), son of Electioneer 125 and Lady Russell 
(sister- to Maud S. 2:08% and dam of 5 in 2:30 list), by Harold 113. The dam of 
™.,\°™ e i s . Bon Mot (dam of Bon Voyage 2:12%. Endow 2:14% and Bequeath 
2:20%), by Erin 2:24%; second dam Farce 2:29%, by Princeps 536; third dam 
Roma (dam of Farce 2:29%. Romance 2:29%, and Guyon 2:27%). by Golddust 50; 
fourth dam Bruna (dam of Woodford Pilot 2:22%), by Pilot Jr. 12. 

Season of 1907 at PLEAS ANTON RACE TRACK. 
$50 for the ScaSOn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded 
~ . should mare not prove in foal. A rare chance to breed 

good mares to an exceptionally high-class and highly bred young stallion. 

2A9X TRIAL 2:12 

(At Four Tears Old) 
Bred at Highland Farm. Dubuque, Iowa 

,.,,? ir " P * ES , SO 29199 < ha 'f brother to Expressive (3) 2:12%) by Advertiser 

ISltar -n f l tc?hv 25 A ; i dam AI, , PHA 2:231/2 (dam ° f Ae »°" 2 18% sire or 
pfooer (damnf m„ m£i? . V * Alcantara by George Wilkes 2:22; second dam Jessie 
bVino Chief 11 Itc producing sons and 7 producing daughters) by Mara- 

mpm , xtt". , Terms, $25 For the Season 

is most f ' ihlmah \l , a nfH , l? l00ki l lg , y0l " 1E stallion, eight years old. His breeding 
flsT records Hp k r T ed ' a f ancestors are Producers of race winners with 

mill or * want to il v ^"tifully gaited and has a perfect disposition. Does not 
fs a hleh clnss L L k f* , SI i eed V aml ca .? be pIaced at wm ln a b "nch of horses. He 

high^ml^elg^ c1ose C °toS^ C po h undl With °" e Mnd a " kIe ' Stands 161 hands 

are mtm^! ♦^ 1 ^ i 11 £ 11S • °™ ed , by W - A " Clark Jr - wln mak « » P^lic season. Both 
and their fn^. 5m\ e W ,?2£ Stallion Representative Stake for three-year-olds, 
year of the race *° eUjrlWe *° thiS rich event ' with ^tblng to pay until the 

Address all communications to 

J. O. Gerre ty, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 

McKinney's Fastest Entire Son 



ZOLOCK 



RECORD 2:05-4 
Reg. No. 34471 



Great Race Horse and Producing Sire. 



Sire of 
Bystander . . . 
Delilah 4) . . 
Sherlock Holmes 
R. Ambush (3) 
Zolahka . . . 
Ingarlta . . . 
Dixie S. . . . 
Dixie W. 
Conchita . . . 



2:08 
2:09 l 4 
2:11 4 
2:14 4 
2:23 
2:25'- 
2:27 
1:27 
;:29 



Tne following trial miles have been 
shown during the last year: Bystander 
2:05%, Delilah 2:05%, R. Ambush 2:10%, 
'ii'iiton 'l" 1 »ro 2:11. Glory 2:11 %, Cleo- 
patra 2:12. Kinney Wood 2:12. Zollie 
2:13, Lillian Zolock 2:14. Conchita 2:17, 
Red Lock 2:18. Angeline 2:18. Adalante 
2:18, Zolocka 2:20, Inaugretta 2:22, 
Mc O. D. 2:22, Hylock 2:25, Majella2:25, 
McNeer 2:25, Denitha 2:25, Bolock 2:27, 
Bonnie June 2:27. Izalco 2:30, and a 
number of others that have been miles 
better than 2:30. His get are all young 
and with one exception. Bystander, none 
of those t hat were trained are over four 
years old. 



Zolock's Sire is the Great McKinney 2:11% 
Zolock's Dam is the Great Brood Mare Gazelle 2:1 1# 

L?ZJ£!!£P%> 2:14, A> dam ° f ZOLOCK 2:05V,, Zep hyr 2:07%; second dam the great 
hi »"'maie Gipsey (by Gen. Booth 2:30%), dam of Gazelle 2:11%, Delilah (3) 2:14%, 
HH-.M '"*.!!!' , ■• ^ 1Uet 2, 2:1 "- Dlxle S - 2:27. and grandam of Col. Gre?n 

. , -■""2. third dam Echo Belle (grandam of Conn 2:15%), by Echo 462; fourth 
duml.y I.mnmox. and fifth dam l>y Grey Eagle. 

ZOLOCK stands IB hands, weighs nearly 1200 pounds, is a beautiful brown 
v„ orse ' f , lanfl proportions. All his colts are good headed, and there has 
never been one that went lame. 

Will Make the Season of 1907 at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 
TERMS FOR THE SEASON, $75 

Season starts February 1st. Mares will be cared for in any manner desired, 
address responsiblht > r for accidents or escapes. For further particulars call or 



HENRY DELANEY, 

University Station, Iios Angeles, 



Cal. 



THE STANDARD BRED STALLION 



Two-year-old record, 2:15 3 4 
By Diablo 2:06i.,, Sire of 
Six in 2:10 list. 



McFadyen 2:151 

Dam, Bee (dam of McFadyen (2) 2:15%, Friskarina (3) 2:13%, and Monroe B. 
2:15%), by Sterling 6223 (son of Egmont, dam Mary by Flaxtail); second dam Flash 
(dam of Javelin 2:08%, Flare Up 2:14, Sally Derby 2:17%, "Walker 2:23%, etc.), by 
Egmont; third dam Lightfoot by Flaxtail 8132. 

Will make the Season of 1907 at my ranch at Dizon, Cal. 

Excellent pasturage at $2.50 per month and the best of care taken of mares. 
TERMS — $40 for the Season. E. D. DUDLEY, Dizon, Cal. 




Redlac 2:07] 

Rejr. No. 40094 

IS THE CHAMPION TROTTER 
Got by the Great Allerton 2:09] 



He holds the World's Race Record ™ ^ tt ^X\ U of a hti n .J2 ?n i*>6 

Of this the Chicago Tribune of January 6. 1907, says: "This is a most re- 
markable feat and coupled with the fact that his first and second dams are mares 
far above the common in producing merit and that he himself is a grandly gaited 
trotter with a fast record and better than two-minute speed, he should certainly 
remain prominent. He is also said to hold the world's record for soundness over 
all trotting stallions with records as fast as his." 

He is by Allerton 2:09%, sire of over 150. First dam is Grandma, dam of two 
by Muscovite 2:18; second dam Lilly, dam of three by J. W. Tedford 2:19% by 
Ensign 2:28%; third dam Mary Ann, by Charley B. 2:40, he by Angle Horse, a 
grandson of llambletonian 10; fourth dam S. T. B., thoroughbred. 

REDLAC is a brown stallion, 15.3 hands high. He is a show horse in individ- 
uality and has perfect disposition and manners. 

A handsome stallion. A grand race horse, and destined to be a great sire. 

WILL MAKE SEASON OF 1907 AT AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES. 
CAL. Mares cared for at reasonable rates and jogged if desired. 

Terms — $50 at Time of Service. 

Contract given with full return privilege or money returned at our option 
Should mare prove not to be in foal. Will not be responsible for accidents or 
escapes. JUSTICE & GRUBB, 

C. J. Orubb, Manager, University Station, Los Angeles, Cal. 

i ^ m~*k *j am /~V By J. J. Audubon 

Audubon Boy 1£9*S£P 

DAM, FLAXY (dam of Audubon Boy 1:59%, Royal R. Sheldon 2:04%, Red Elm 
2:16% and grandam of Simon Kenton 2:13% and Mary Louise 2:27%), by Bourbon 
Wilkes 2345 (sire of Coastman 2:08%, Split Silk 2:08%, Sunland Belle 2:08%. etc.), 
he by George Wilkes 2:22, out of Favorite 2:35% (dam of 1 and five sires of 135 
In 2:30). by Abdallah 15. Flaxy's dam was Kit, by Clark Chief S9 (sire of 6 and 
dams of 35); second dam Nelly by Grey Denmark. J. J. Audubon 16696 was by 
Alcyone 2:27, out of Dolly Pomeroy (dam of Miss Pomeroy 2:22% and J. J. Audu- 
bon), by Highland Grey 2:28 (sire of 8, including Highland L. 2:14%); second 
dam, Nelly. 

First and only horse whose entire racing career (56 heats) averages 2:08> 4 . 

First and only horse at 5 years to pace twice in one day in 2:03*4, winning race. 

First and only horse to pace in 2:0014, first trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59%, second trial against time. 

First and only horse to pace to the half in 57} 2 seconds. 

First and only horse to pace to the three-quarter in 1:27%. 

First and only horse to pace in 1:59%, first trial second year. 

First and only horse to pace again in 2:00, same week, same year. 

First and only horse to pace twice in 2:00 in one week. 

All of the above without the aid of wind or dust shield and all under unfavor- 
able conditions, the most unfavorable of all being when he paced in 1:59' 4 . 

WILL STAND AT AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, TO 
A FEW GOOD MARES. 
TERMS — $100 for the Season. $150, with return privilege or money refunded. 

For further particulars address J. Y. GATCOMB, 
A gricu ltural Park, Lo s Angeles, Cal. 

Mendocino 22607 

RECORD (THREE-YEAR-OLD) 2:19% 

Sire of Monte Carlo 2:07% (to wagon 2:08%); Mendolita 2:07%, Idolita (2 y. o.) 
2:21%, (3 y. o.) 2:12, (a) 2:09%; Leonora 2:12%, Polka Dot 2:14%. etc. Bay stallion, 
15.3% hands; weight 1190 pounds; hind feet and ankles white; foaled April 24, 
1889. Bred at Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Sire, ELECTIONEER 125, son of llambletonian 10. First dam. MANO (dam 
of Mendocino (3) 2:19%, Electant 2:19%, Morocco (3 y. o. trial 2:22), by Piedmont 
904, 2:17%; second dam, Mamie (dam of Mamie W. (3) 2:17%, Hyperion 2:21%, 
Memento 2:25%, Mithra (p) 2:14%), by Hambletonian Jr. 1882; third dam, Gilda 
(thoroughbred) by imp. Mango. 

MENDOCINO is one of Electioneer's youngest and best sons. With very limited 
opportunities in the stud he has proven his worth by producing such racehorses as 
Monte Carlo and Idolita. Two new additions to his 2:30 list were made last season 
and he now has twelve standard performers. His foals are good size, line lookers, 
bold and pure gaited and easily developed. 

SERVICE FEE for Season of 1907, $75; usual return privilege. 

/UcKena 39460 

Brown Stallion, 16.2 hands; weight 1350 pounds; foaled April 11, 1900. Bred 
at Palo Alto Stock Farm. Sire, McKINNEY 8818 (record 2:11%). First dam. 
HELENA 2:11% (dam of Wildnutling 2:11%, Dobbel 2:22. llyita (trial 2:12), by 
Electioneer 125; second dam, Lady Ellen 2:29% (dam of six in list, including Helena 
2:11%, Ellen Wood 2:14%), by Mambrino 1789; third dam, Ida May Jr. by Owen 
Dale; fourth dam, Ida May by Belmont (Williamson's). 

McKENA has proven a remarkably sure foal getter. He should make a great 
sire as he is a finq individual and bred right. His sire, McKinney, a game and fast 
racehorse and sire of game and fast racehorses. His dam. Helena, one of the fastest 
and gamest daughters of Electioneer, the greatest sire of trotters the world has yet 
known. His second dam, Lady Ellen, was one of the best of her day, and as well as 
her daughter Helena is a great broodmare. 

SERVICE FEE for Season of 1907, $40; usual return privilege. 

MENDOCINO and McKENA will make the season at PALO ALTO STOCK 
FARM. Mares may run on pasture at $7.50 per month. No responsibility assumed 
by the Palo Alto Stock Farm for injury or escapes. Address all communications to 

PALO ALTO STOCK FARM, 

Stanford University, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



By McKinney 2:11 %; 
Dam Helena 2:11%. 



Saturday, February 9, 1907.] 

THE WEEKLY 

Breeder and Sportsman 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 
OFFICE: 61S GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, 
SAN FRANCISCO 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms— One Year $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED. 



AUDUBON BOY 1:59%. .J. Y. Gatcomb, Los Angeles 

AXWORTHY (3) 2:15% 

Empire City Farm, Cuba, N. Y. 

BONNIE DIRECT 2:05%... C. L. Griffith, Pleasanton 
BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% 

J. O. Gerrety, Mgr., Pleasanton, Cal. 

HIGHLAND C. 2:19% 

J. O. Gerrety, Mgr., Pleasanton, Cal. 

IRAN ALTO 2:12%. .H. S. Hogoboom, Woodland, Cal. 

McFADYEN (2) 2:15% E. D. Dudley, Dixon, Cal. 

McKENA 39460 

Palo Alto Stock Farm, Stanford University, Cal. 
McKINNEY 2:11% 

Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

MENDOCINO (3) 2:19% 

Palo Alto Stock Farm, Stanford University, Cal. 

REDLAC 2:07% C. J. Grubb, Los Angeles, Cal. 

ZOLOCK 2: 05%.. Henry Delaney, Los Angeles, Cal. 



THE FADDIST is abroad in this great land of 
ours, and whenever opportunity offers he rushes to 
the Legislature and asks that a law be passed to 
enforce his particular fad. Government control is 
asked for everything from smoking cigarettes to 
the wearing of feathers on ladies' hats, until we 
begin to wonder whether the compilers of the old 
"blue laws" have not appeared again in the flesh 
and are busily at work trying to have things run 
to suit their antiquated and narrow ideas. New 
England has been prolific of these faddists in the 
past, and they are not all dead yet. A bill was re- 
cently introduced in the Massachusetts Legislature 
which proposes to make it unlawful for any person 
to ride or drive a horse on any public or private way 
wearing hopples, or hobbles, or any harness which 
binds the hind leg to the fore leg to control the 
gait; also for the proprietor or lessee of any public 
race track, or any racing society or agricultural as- 
sociation, to allow a horse wearing hopples, or hob- 
bles, to start in races or to work with other horses 
on the track, a penalty of not less than $100 nor 
more than $500 fine is imposed. While it may be 
perfectly right and proper for racing and breeding 
associations to discourage the use of hopples, the 
idea of asking the State to pass laws on the subject 
is about as absurd as anything that has yet been 
suggested by those who think the State should com- 
pel all others to live according to their standard. 
While we are calling attention to the absurdity of 
this proposed legislation in the codfish State, we 
should not omit reference to a very silly law that 
is before the California Legislature. We refer to 
the bill which provides for a commission to pass 
upon the qualifications of horseshoers. This is not 
a "reform" measure, however, but has its principal 
support from those who desire to get a chance to 
draw salaries from the State. These petty graft 
commissions are among the greatest evils in State 
government. It does not seem at first glance that 
a great hardship will be inflicted on California horse- 
shoers who will be called upon to pass an examina- 
tion before the proposed commission and pay one or 
two dollars for a license to do business, but it will 
be an injustice just the same; and the only result 
will be diversion of these dollars from the pockets 
of several thousand horseshoers to the pockets of 
three or four persons who would probably fail were 
they required to pass an examination as to their 
own ability to shoe horses properly, were the ex- 
amination questions prepared by any one but them- 
selves. 



DRIVING CLUBS should be warned against hold- 
ing meetings where gate money Is charged and 
privileges sold until the National Trotting Associa- 
tion amends its rules to correspond with those re- 
cently adopted by the American Trotting Associa- 



NVWSXHOJS Q NV H 3 Q 3 ST H g 3 H J, 

tion. When the fact was published recently that 
Mr. Magnus Flaws had secured the adoption by 
the American Association of a rule whereby driv- 
ing clubs and other associations would be permitted 
to hold ten days of racing each year, at which ad- 
mission could be charged and certain privileges sold 
without the winning horses being penalized with rec- 
ords, a general impression prevailed among horse- 
men that this rule would apply forthwith to all 
tracks. This is not true, for until the National As- 
sociation adopts the same rule, horses winning heats 
at any meeting where all the National Association 
rules are not obeyed will be penalized by it. The 
Board of Review of the National Trotting Associa- 
tion will be held in New York in May, and at that 
meeting the new rule adopted by the American Asso- 
ciation and which has met the approval of all ama- 
teur horsemen and driving club memebrs may be 
taken up, indorsed and adopted, but until the Na- 
tional Association does this, clubs should be very 
careful about giving matinee racing where admis- 
sion is charged or privileges sold. 



EVERY OWNER AND TRAINER of light harness 
horses in California is anxiously awaiting the an- 
nouncement of purses and stakes to be made by the 
different associations that are to hold meetings in 
California this year. One of the principal meetings, 
the one at Petaluma, is already in the field with 
an excellent and very generous program, and the 
California State Agricultural Society will doubtless 
announce its trotting and pacing program at the 
next meeting of the Board, which is to be held at 
Sacramento on the 23d of this month. The San 
Joaquin Valley Circuit has its purses for the four 
weeks of its circuit already arranged and will pub- 
lish them very soon. Los Angeles and San Bernardino 
will also make their announcements by the first of 
March. There will be plenty of racing, but the as- 
sociations should let the horsemen know what purses 
and classes will be given just as early as they pos- 
sibly can. It is not necessary to close entries early, 
but owners and trainers must know what horses 
to train. In justice to the men who pay entrance 
money and thus make good purses possible, we hope 
the associations will be prompt this year in making 
their announcements. 



DISPATCHES FROM WASHINGTON state that 
the Agricultural Appropriation Bill, which the com- 
mittee has agreed upon, increases the appropriation 
from $25,000 to $50,000 for horse breeding experi- 
ments. It provides among other things that such 
experiments shall be undertaken in States where 
the cost is defrayed half by the general Government 
and half by the State, not more than $7,500 to go 
to experiments in any one State. The California Leg- 
islature would do a wise thing were its members 
to take cognizance of this measure and make an 
appropriation of $7,500 to meet that made by the 
Government. This amount" would enable the State 
Farm at Davisville to begin early on horse breed- 
ing, and would accomplish much good as well as 
add wealth to the State. 



THE SUGGESTIONS of Mr. H. D. McKinney in 
regard to starting horses in trotting and pacing 
races, which appear in another column, will be read 
with interest. Out here in California a few years 
ago this plan was given a partial trial, by having 
an assistant starter on the track near the distance 
pole, but he was not giveri any authority except 
to warn the drivers when there was "no chance." 
The placing of the official starter at the turning 
ponnt as Mr. McKinney suggests is worth trying. 



HORSE OWNERS, like most people who are called 
upon to make annual reports to the Assessor, often 
place a lower value on their property for assess- 
ment purposes than they do for some others, but 
allowing for all this the trotting bred horse cuts 
quite a figure in the revenue of the different States 
of the Union. A statistician has figured out that 
the assessed value of all trotting bred stock in the 
United States last year was $100,000,000. That's quite 
an industry, isn't it? 



HENRY HELMAN, with several other trainers 
who expect to race in California, suggests that a 
2:09 pace be given instead of a 2:10. It is evident 
that a 2:09 class would draw a larger entry than 
the 2:10. The Oregon State Fair will probably open 
a big stake for 2:09 pacers. 



s: 

THE CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT. 

The claiming of dates by the State Fair, Petaluma, 
Breeders' Association, Woodland, and the San 
Joaquin Valley Circuit, with others to claim soon, 
is whipping the California Circuit into shape, and it 
will now be about as follows: 

San Bernardino (Spring meeting) 

week ending June 29 

Los Angeles (Spring meeting) 



week ending July G 

Santa Maria week ending July 13 

Salinas week ending July 20 

Hollister week ending July 27 

Pleasanton week ending August 3 

Vallejo week ending August 10 

Ukiah week ending August 17 

Santa Rosa week ending August 24 

Petaluma week ending August 31 

Woodland week ending September 7 

Sacramento (State Fair) . .week ending September 14 

Fresno week ending September 21 

Hanford week ending September 28 

Tulare week ending October 5 

Bakersfield week ending October 12 

San Bernardino (Fall meeting) . . .date to be selected 

Los Angeles (Fall meeting) date to be selected 

o 

"SAN BERDOO" IS ALL RIGHT. 



The San Bernardino and Riverside Harness Horse 
Association met at Redlands last Tuesday and elected 
the following officers: 

President, G. W. Prescott of Highland. 

Vice-President, Maurice Griffen of Riverside. 

Secretary, Robt. T. Curtis of Rod lands. 

Treasurer, W. W. Brisom of San Bernardino. 

It was the unanimous opinion of all that the 
dates set by the convention at Pleasanton gave the 
association as good dates as the association could 
have chosen for itself. 

The association wil soon announce its program and 
will probably give a couple of early closing events, 
and seven or eight other purses, with a couple 
of free-for-all races, making about r.ine or ten races, 
or sufficient for a three days' meeting. 

In Mr. Curtis the association has an energetic 
secretary and all the officials will act together to 
make this, the opening meeting of the circuit, a 
great success. 

o 

THE BEST IN YEARS. 

There has not been in years such a choice lot of 
horses consigned to the auction block in California 
as the twenty-five that will go under the hammer 
at Fred H. Chase's big new pavilion on Valencia 
street Monday evening, February 25th. This is the 
consignment of the estate of James Coffin, deceased. 
Among those on which bidding will probably be 
lively, is the gelding Admiral Togo, with a two-year- 
old record of 2:29%, and now a magnificent, sound, 
five-year-old that looks as though ne would be one 
of the sensational trotters of 1907. He is a well- 
bred son of Iran Alto 2:12%, and like all that family 
is game as a pebble and a sure race horse. Some 
of the best posted and most conservative horsemen 
at Pleasanton predict a mark below 2:i0 for this 
gelding this year and as he is now in perfect condi- 
tion he will be ready to race as soon as racing be- 
gins. A better gaited trotter it would be hard to 
find. He is eligbile to all the big trotting purses 
that will be offered this year, and is a good prospect 
for such races as the M. and M., the Charter Oak 
and the Transylvania. 

Another very high class one in (he consignment 
is Grace Zolock, a two-year-old pacing flliy by Zolock 
2:05% out of Grace Kaiser, the dam of Conev 2:02, 
Stipulator 2:11%, McZeus 2:13, Grace McK. 2:21%. 
Grace Zolock is black and one of the most highly 
formed and clean limbed fillies ever seen in Cali- 
fornia. She is well staked and as she has great 
natural speed and looks very classy, there is reason 
to believe she will be a very fast performer. Her 
gait is smooth and there seems to be no limit to 
her speed. She is being regularly exercised and 
will be ready to commence regular training the day 
after the sale if necessary. This filly would attract 
attention on any track and would make a feature 
horse for such sales as the Blue Ribbon and Old 
Glory. When her racing days are over she will be 
in demand as a broodmare on her breeding alone. 

Another splendid two-year-old filly is Rose Lecco, 
by Lecco 2:09%, out of Rose McKinney, the dam 
of Almaden 2:22%, Breeders Futurity and Occident 
winner. She has size, conformation, plenty of style 
and natural speed and has a license to win a good 
portion of the stakes in which she is entered. 

Those looking for high class broodmares will 
find several in this consignment that are already 
in "The Great Table" in the Year Book. Grace 
Kaiser, dam of four; Carrie Malone, dam of two, 
etc., etc 



i 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



f Saturday. February 0, 1907. 



MR. GEO. C. NEED BUYS SOME GOOD ONES. 



Irvngton, Cal., February 3d, 1906. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal. 

Dear Sir— On January 31st, 1907, I sold to George 
('. Need of Gait, Cal., twelve head of broodmares 
and fillies. Four of the broodmares were bred to 
Nutwood Wilkes and I believe all to be in foal. 

Little Witch 2:27 by Director, dam Leroy, etc., 
with her yearling filly by Nutwood Wilkes; this 
mare is a producer of early and extreme speed; she 
has two very fast ones by Nutwood Wilkes which 
will be heard from later. 

Caroline, by Direct Line, dam by Cal. Nutwood, 
graafian) Kitty by Speculation, etc., together with 
her yearling filly by Nutwood Wilkes. She has a 
very fast son by Nutwood Wilkes that is owned 
by a party now in Los Angeles. 

Brown Line by Direct Line, dam by the Grand 
Moor, etc., is the dam of Little Jib that has paced 
quarters in 29 seconds. 

Lady Mine by Cal. Nutwood, dam Lou G. by Albert 
W. (both great producng mares) together with a 
yearling filly by Nutwood Wilkes. I sold this mare's 
two-year-old colt last fall, after working a half in 
1:16 and an eighth in 17 seconds, with very little 
work, for $400. All her colts seem to have speed. 

Mr. Need gets eight fillies by Nutwood Wilkes 
from seven months to five years old, and thev are 
all of the richest breeding. 

To give them all in detail would make a very 
large item, but for a sample here is one of them: 
Bay filly, three years old, by Nutwood Wilkes, dam 
Bonnie Derby by Chas. Derby. Bonnie Derby paced 
an eighth on the Pleasanton track in 15 seconds. 
Second dam Bon Bon. record 2:26, by Simmons 2:28, 
dam of Bonnie Direct 2:051,4, Bonnie Steinway 2:06%' 
Rector 2:10y 2 and Bonsaline 2:14%. Third dam 
Bonnie Wilkes 2:29. the dam of four in the list, by 
Geo. Wilkes 2:22. Fourth dam Betty Viley by Bob 
Johnson, she the dam of Bonnie Wilkes 2:29. All 
back of that thoroughbred. The breeding of this 
filly should suit most any one; it certainly suited 
Mr. Need because he wouldn't take "no" for an 
answer. This young man is certainlv starting right 
in the business. He got eight Nutwood Wilkeses, 
and more to come from the mares now in foal. He 
is the owner of Golden Baron, a four-year-old by 
Barondale 2:11%; first dam by Wilkes Boy 2:24% 
by Geo. Wilkes 2:22; second dam by Young Jim 
and he by Geo. Wilkes; third dam by Administrator- 
next dam by Mambrino Patchen, etc. This horse 
Mr. Need claimed, worked a mile in 2:24 at Sacra- 
mento last year, and mated with the Nutwood Wilkes 
mares will produce the richest kind of breeding and 
should throw speed by the wholesale, as Nutwood 
W tikes s daughters seem to nick with any and all 
kinds of blood and to produce extreme speed. 

As these fillies are all well bred and some of the 
older ones that have been broken are very promis- 
ing, he is likely to get one or two out of the lot 
that will bring him more than he paid for all of 
them. 

Wishing him the best kind of luck in his new 
enterprise, I am 

Yours very truly, 

MARTIN CARTER. 

o 

SOME HINTS TO SECRETARIES. 

To the Christmas Horse Review a trainer and 
owner. Mr. M. W. Johnson, furnished a very timelv 
and interesting article on the management of rac- 
ing at county fairs which should be read by every 
secretary. We have not space to print it entire but 
give the following extracts for the benefit of those 
who are now engaged in arranging programs for the 
( alifornia Circuit: 

"Every secretary desires a good entry list, but 
many of them fail through making bad arrange- 
ments of their classes. Years ago, when the busi- 
ness was in its infancy, it was all right to make a 
3:00 class, a 2:40 class and a 2:30 class, and then 
lump from that to a free-for-all. for it was possible 
that there would not be a heat trotted or paced dur- 
ing the entire meeting in 2:30; but now, when a 
horse would hardly be thought worthv of making an 
entry on, even at a half-mile track, if he had not 
shown a mile in at least 2:30, such an arrangement 
M classes is plainly unsuited to the conditions If 
it were late in the season and a program were ar- 
ranged as above, it would fail to fill because nearlv 
every horse that, was racing would have a record 
that would bar it from everything but the free-for- 
a . Therefore, as any horse that is fit to race at 
all can surely beat 2:30 trotting, or 2:25 pacing 
here is no wisdom in making any slower classes 
han these. Then, by dropping three seconds at a 
lme for each class, you give any horse a chance 
o start in something, as you can't miss him over 
three seconds. 

"Another point to look out for in making a free- 
for-all is not to make your fastest class race too 
fast, else your free-for-all will not fill. For example: 
" von had a free-for-all pace and also a 2:10 or 
2:11 pace, your free-for-all and your 2:11 pace would 
neither one fill— you would merely have two or three 
entries in each. But, if you made a free-for-all and 

y » Ur .J «f St o Class race a 2:14 ' )ace - >' ou would force 
all the 2:13. 3:12. 2:11 and 2:10 pacers into the 
free-for-all and thus make a good race of it For 
trotters it is advisable to make your fastest class 
trot about four seconds slower than the fastest class 
pace. 

"I am speaking now of the ordinary county fair 
and not of the Grand Circuit races. A very nice pro- 



gram for a county fair and one that will give any 
horse a chance to start is as follows: 2:30, 2:27, 
2:24, 2:21, 2:18 and free-for-all trot; 2:26, 2:23, 2:20, 
2:17, 2:i4 and free-for-all pace. By all means make 
a free-for-all pace and trot, and if the fastest class 
race is not made too fast, it will always fill well 
enough, and it will always be your big drawing card. 
Another reason for making a free-for-all is that 
oftentimes a stajle is carrying along a fast trotter 
or pacer for which you would have no class if you 
merely made a fast class race instead of a free-for- 
all. Thus you would not only lose this entry, but 
possibly the entry of the whole stable, perhaps 
amounting to as much as one race would cost you, 
as the manager would naturally be attracted to the 
town where he could race all the members of his 
stable. If you want to add a class you can close up 
between the fastest and slowest class races as above, 
but do not make any faster class race. You can 
make a "green" trot or pace or a very slow class 
which would amount to the same thing; or, if you 
want to cut out a class, you can spread them four 
seconds instead of three. Whatever you do, do not 
make more than one very slow class and no very 
fast classes, as 90 per cent of all the horses that 
you are making classes to suit will be capable of 
miles somewhere between 2:14 and 2:22. 

"The program as outlined will suit nearly any race 
meeting or fair over the half-mile tracks and it 
should he used as it is, with just the regular increase 
in the classes' of two, three or four seconds between 
each. If you begin "jumping around" to favor some 
particular horse or stable, you will be likely to spoil 
your program for about nine other stables and thus 
ruin your entry list. 

"In closing your entries, do not close them too far 
ahead. If you do, you will more than likely be under 
the necessity of reopening for lack of them. I prefer 
to have them close on Thursday or Friday of the 
week preceding the meeting. This will give you 
just time enough to get them all in by Monday and 
your entry list printed and mailed to each nominator 
as required by the rules. It will take duick work, 
but you don't want a lot of time to throw away loafing 
around. 

Whenever you receive an entry, acknowledge the 
receipt at once, and notify the nominator of the num- 
ber of the stalls reserved for him, which you can do 
by making out a "stall book" and assigning stalls in 
it as the entries come in. Also inform him if his 
class has filled, and DO NOT FAIL TO ENCLOSE A 
BADGE FOR HIMSELF AND LADY. It will save 
you a lot of trouble for your gate man, and, incident- 
ally, for yourself, as the owner or manager of a 
stable hardly ever arrives with the stable, but after 
the beginning of the meeting. Then he is held up at 
the gate, must put up admission fee to get in, which 
you will have to return later, and it always gives 
him a bad feeling towards your associaton at the 
very outset, especially if he has trouble to recover 
his gate money. All this useless friction is saved 
if you mail his badge on receipt of his entry, and 
if he never uses the badge for his "lady," the cour- 
tesy will be appreciated and you will make a friend 
of him at once. Badges should also be mailed to 
each owned and lady, as well as the nominator and 
driver. Nine out of ten of the badges will never 
be used, perhaps, but it gives the owner a warm 
feeling toward the association to be remembered 
in this manner and it don't cost the association a 
cent, whether the badges are used or not. It will 
be worth many dollars in advertising to your meet- 
ing." 



DEATH OF CHARLES MARVIN. 



A GOOD THING TO SEND EAST. 



The California Promotion Committee has just is- 
sued the California Annual for 1907. and in it pre- 
sents some remarkable statistics regarding financial, 
commercial and industrial growth of the State, its 
tables showing bank clearings of the principal cities 
of the Coast and of the Middle West, as well as those 
of California. Industrial productions are shown in 
complete and comprehensive tables, together with 
population changes, as found in an exhaustive census 
taken by the Committee. 

Beginning with the foreword, which explains the 
objects of the book and the work of the Commit- 
tee, the reader is carried through the State in a 
series of chapters covering topography, soil, cnmate. 
all the various industries, city and suburban life, 
out-door life and health resorts, together with ex- 
haustive chapters on financial and commercial in- 
terests of the State. 

In connection with this publication the Committee 
has followed its usual method and gives accurate 
and reliable information about the entire State in 
such concrete form as to make it a most valuable 
book for sending to Eastern friends. There is no 
industry or advantage that is overlooked, and in 
every chapter there is a fund of information of value 
to any one desirous of learning about the State. 

The booklet is compact and of such size and shape 
as to make it easy to handle and available; for mail- 
ing. It presents as a frontispiece a topographicial 
map of California, showing mountains and water 
courses of the whole State in relief. Sent postpaid 
to any address. Price 10 cents. 

o 

Fred W. Wright, the New York representative 
of the Frazier Sulky Company, has sent his promis- 
ing trotting mare Dolly Worthy to trainer Ike Flem- 
ing at the Empire City track. She is by the great 
young sire Axworthy (3) 2:15%, and Dolly Phoebe, 
a full sister to Phoebe Wilkes 2:08%, by Hamble- 
tonlan Wilkes. 



The press dispatches of February 2d announced 
the death at Lexington, Kentucky, on the 1st tost, 
of Charles Marvin, one of the greatest rcinsmen and 
colt trainers this country has ever produced. He 
had been in poor health for several years, but ap- 
peared in the sulky often, until during the latter 
part of 1906. when his illness became acute and he 
was confined to his home a greater part of the time. 
A few weeks ago he went to a sanitarium, but grad- 
ually grew worse and passed away as stated. 

Charles Marvin's name has been a household word 
in America for many years. He drove Smuggler to 
the world's trotting stallion record of 2:20%, at 
Buffalo, New York. August 5th. 1874, and when a 
few days later Mambrino Gift lowered the record 
to 2:20 at Rochester, Marvin determined to beat it 
with the son of Blanco. At Mystic Park. Boston, 
in September, Smuggler equalled Mambrino Gift's 
time, and two years later at Philadelphia Marvin 
drove him to a record of 2:17, a few days later re- 
ducing this mark to 2:16%. again in August to 
2:15% at the Rochester track and August 31st. 1S76. 
at Charter Oak placed Smuggler's record at 2:15%. 
This remained the stallion record until 1884, when 
I'hallas reduced it to 2:13%. 

When Senator Stanford established Palo Alto Stock 
Farm, Marvin was selected as the trainer and 
achieved wonderful success and the table of cham- 
pion trotters contains the names of the following 
driven by him* 

Sunol 2:08% by Electioneer, champion trotter of 
1891. 

Palo Alto 2:08% by Electioneer, champion stallion 
of 1891. 

Champion yearlings, Hinda Rose 2:36% in 1881; 
Norlaine 2:31% in 1887: Bell Bird 2:27% in 1887. 

Champion two-year-olds — Fred Crocker 2:25% in 
1880; Sunol 2:17 in 1888; Arion 2:10% in 1891. This 
record was made to a high wheel sulky and has 
never been equalled by any two-year-old trotter 
since. 

Champion three-year-olds — Hinda Rose 2:19% in 
1883; Sunol 2:10% in 1889, and Arion 2:10% in 
1892. 

Champion four-year-olds — Bonita 2:18% in 1883; 
Sally Benton 2:17% in 1884; Manzanita 2:16 in 
1886; Sunol 2:10% in 1890. 

Champion five-year-old — Sunol 2:08% in 1891. 

The above and a vast number of others were given 
their records by Mr. Marvin, and could the list of 
horses he has marked be compiled it would doubtless 
show nearly if not quite 500 horses that he has 
given records to. 

Marvin left Palo Alto Farm many years ago and 
entered the employ of Miller & Sibley as Superin- 
tendent of Prospect Hill Stock Farm, Pa., but for 
a number of years past had been breeding and train- 
ing trotters on his own account. 

His death removes from the list of the living one 
of the most successful trainers the American turf 
has seen and will be sincerely regretted by all who 
knew him. His book "Training the Trotter" sets 
forth his views on the handling of colts and teach 
ing them how to go. and has had a very large 
sale". 

o 

A SUGGESTION FROM KINGS COUNTY. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. It means health. 



Hanford, Cal., February 4th. 1907. 

Breeder and Sportsman — Having noticed Mr. Harry 
Stover's advertisement for a race meeting at his 
Kenilworth Park, Petaluma. and that a $2000 stake 
for the 2:10 pace is offered, I would suggest to 
Mr. Stover, through the columns of your valued 
paper, that hight here in Hanford. Mr. I. M. Lipson 
has Doctor W. 2:08% and Mr. Kimball has recently 
purchased Miss Idaho 2:09. both horses now being 
driven over the Hanford track. There are also 
Cuckoo 2:08% and Tidal Wave 2:09, and many 
others with records to prevent their going in the 
2:10 class, while they would be eligible to the 2:09 
class. It would be a hardship on owners of such 
horses therefore to bar them from this race, and 
I would respectfully make the suggestion that many 
more entries will be obtained by changing it to a 
2:09 class, as therefore the double result of more 
entries and better racing would follow. I think you 
and Mr. Stover will coincide with me that any 
horseman who is willing to enter in the 2:10 class 
will be equally willing to enter in the 2:09 class. 

At the request of the owners, Messrs. Berry and 
Vincent, I found a purchaser in Hanford for the 
Wilkes-Electioneer stallion Expressive Mac, 41523, 
his new owner being Mr. J. H. Nelson, a young 
farmer living near Hanford. The sale was com- 
pleted on the 2d inst., and the horse transferred 
from my stable at the Kings County Fair Grounds, 
to the adjoining stables of Leggett & Nelson. Mr. 
M. G. Leggett will train Expressive Mac for a record 
next fall. Meanwhile he will be in the stud and 
you will soon receive his advertisement. 

Yours sincerely, 

PHILIP C. BYRNE. 

[According to our records Miss Idaho, mentioned 
above, has a record of 2:09%, Cuckoo one of 2:09%. 
The horses on this coast that were in training last 
year, with records that would bar them from the 
2:10 class but permit them to start in the 2:09 class 
pace are Miss Georgie 2:08%, Doctor W. 2:08%. 
Daedalion 2:08% 4 Tom Carneal 2:08%, Tidal Wave 
2:09 and John R. Conway 2:09.— Ed. B. and S.] 
o 

TO CURE A COLD IN ONE DAT 

Take LAXATIVE BROMO Quinine Tablets. Drug- 
gists refund money if it fails to cure. E. W. GROVE'S 
signature Is on each box. 25c. 



Saturday, February 9, 1907.] 



THE BREEDER AND S P O RTSMAN 



LOS ANGELES MATINEE. 

The first of a series of bi-monthly matinees was 
given by the Los Angeles Driving Club at Agricultural 
Park, Saturday, January 26th. 

Danube, the good brown horse belonging to Capt. 
J. C. Newton, won the Hamburger cup in the free- 
for-all trot in straight heats. Danube had to trot the 
first mile in 2:15 to win. as Hazel Kinney and Glory 
were in good form, and although outclassed, per- 
formed creditably. For a three-year-old Glory showed 
much speed, trotting but a few lengths behind 
Danube in the 2:15 heat. 

Welcome Mac proved a surprise. The honest 
brown gelding was not himself, and allowed Henry 
N. to beat him in the slow time of 2:21. Mac paced 
as though all stove up, but warmed to his task in 
the second heat and made a better showing. 

Siegfried broke in the last heat of the 2:20 pace, 
and Rondo beat him under the wire by a head. Each 
had won one heat and Siegfried had made the best 
time, but he is a bad actor and within 100 yards of 
the wire lost his feet and had to be pulled up. Be- 
fore he got to going properly Rondo caught up and 



passed him. Results: 

Club Cup, three-minute pace — 

Amos Ketchum, s. g. (McLeland) 1 1 

June, b. m. (Stewart) 2 2 

Minnie S., br. m. (Snowden) 3 d 

Time— 2:48, 2:44. 
Club Cup, 2:20 pace- 
Rondo, b. g. (Johnson) 1 2 1 

Siegfried, b. g. (Long) 2 1 2 

Bernie Wilkes, b. m. (Deulser) 3 3 3 

Pasa del Robles, b. g. (Delorey) 4 dr 

Time— 2:24, 2:20. 
Hamburger Cup, free-for-all trot — 

Danube, br. h. i Newton) 1 1 

Hazel Kinney, b. m. (Reynolds) 2 2 

Glory, br. h. (Springer) 3 3 

Time— 2:15, 2:16. 
Clark Cup, free-for-all pace — 

Henry N., gr. g. (Delorey) 1 1 

Welcome Mac, br. g. (Hughes) 2 2 

Time — 2:21, 2:16. 
Club Cup, 2:30 trot- 
Don Z., b. g. (Springer) 1 1 

Gen. Garcia, b. g. (Colyear) 2 3 

Geraldine, br. m. (Reynolds) 3 2 

Time— 2:30, 2:30. 
o ■ 



MATINEES AND BANQUET. 



The directors of the Riverside Driving Club met 
Monday evening, January 28th, with their secretary, 
Maurice Griffin, to perfect plans for the next matinee 
race meeting and the annual banquet and business 
meeting, says the Riverside Press. 

It was voted to have the matinee races on Thurs- 
day, February 14th, and the annual meeting on the 
same evening. The original plan was to have the 
races on Washington's Birthday, February 22d, but 
when it was found that the San Bernardino Driving 
Club had already perfected plans for a big meeting 
on that day, it was thought best to set the local 
meet a week ahead and to combine with the San 
Bernardino drivers in making both meets a big suc- 
cess. Therefore, all the San Bernardino speedy ones 
will be over on the 14th to compete with the local 
drivers for honors on a fast card, and the Riverside 
horses will go to San Bernardino on the 22d. 

A fine lot of cups and prizes will be offered for 
the winners of the various events at the local meet- 
ing. Tom Noland and Dr. Ramsey were named as 
the committee on prizes, with instructions to provide 
an attractive list. The subscriptions for this pur- 
pose were most generous. 

The annual banquet and business meeting will be 
held at Concordia Hall on the evening of the 14th. 
All the members of the San Bernardino Driving Club 
will be invited to participate in the meeting, and it 
was to accommodate the large number expected to 
be present that the banquet was scheduled for the 
Concordia Hall rather than one of the hotels or res- 
taurants. The banquet will be followed by the busi- 
ness meeting and election of directors and officers. 

o 

OUR COMING STATE FAIR. 



The California State Fair to be held at Sacramento 
in September will be the greatest exposition held 
in this State since the Midwinter Fair. 

The National Irrigation Congress of two or three 
thousand delegates from all over the United States 
will meet in Sacramento at the time of the Fair, and 
many of the States represented will send exhibits 
of their products, which of themselves will make 
an extensive and very attractive feature. At present 
there is talk of enlarging the name as well as the 
scope of the Fair, and call it, say, "The California 
Agricultural and Inter-State Irrigated Products Ex- 
position." 

The opportunity for California counties to assem- 
ble and show their products will be the best, they 
have had for a long time, and it is anticipated that 
every section and every product of the State will be 
liberally represented, while every effort will be 
put forth to make the poultry and live stock de- 
partments the biggest and most attractive ever seen 
on the Coast. 

o 

The trotting mare Nahma by Peter the Great 
2:07%, dam by Bingen 2: 06 14, is considered such a 
good prospect for the big Grand Circuit purses this 
year that the owner, B. A. Bulkley, of Bridgeport. 
Conn., thought $10,000 was not quite enough for 
her when it was offered recently. 



ONE OF A GREAT FAMILY. 



Young stallions that have size, style, good color, 
speed and good breeding are not as plentiful as 
the other sort, and when one is found that fultills 
all these requirements, owners of mares should note 
his location and send their best mares to be mated 
with him. 

At iJKiah, Alendocino county. Lewis Charlton has 
such a horse and has placed him in the stud there 
for the season of 1907. This horse is Dumont S. 
2:20, whose picture is given herewith. 

Dumont S. belongs to a very illustrious family, be- 
ing an own brother to the famous mare Sonoma 
Girl, whose matinee record of 2:07 trotting attracted 
world-wide attention. He was sired by that remark- 
able horse, Lynwood W., the sire of Charley Belden 
2:08%, biggest money winner on the Great Western 
Circuit of 1906. Lynwood W. was himself a horse 
of very remarkable speed, trotting to his record of 
2:20 when a two-year-old, after which he was in- 
jured so that he was not trained further after the 
accident. Lynwood W. is a very handsome horse and 
even now can show close to two-minute speed when- 
ever he is given his head. His dam is Lindale 
by oultan Jr., a son of Sultan 1513; second dam 
Flora Pierson by Gen. McClellan 144; third dam by 
Langford, a son of Williamson's Belmont. 






> ) 
Dumont S. 2:20. 

The dam of Dumont S. 2:20 is the great brood 
mare Maud Fowler 2:21%, that is the dam also of 
Sonoma Maid 2:29%, Sonoma Queen 2:25 and the 
sensational Sonoma Girl, matinee record 2:07. Maud 
Fowler was a very game mare, made her record 
in a race and was sired by the great Electioneer 
stallion Anteeo 2:16%, sire of 52 trotters and two 
pacers in the list, and whose daughters have pro- 
duced Directum Kelly 2:08%, W. Wood 2:07, Grey 
Gem 2:09% and many other fast ones. 

Eveline, the grandam of Dumont S. 2:20, is also 
a great brood mare and has to her credit Ole 2:10%, 
Roblet 2:12 (dam of Bonalet (3) 2:09%), Tietam 
2:19, Maud Fowler 2:21% and others, and is the 
grandam of a half dozen more. She is by the great 
Nutwood 2:18%, the greatest sire of brood mares 
that ever lived. Nutwood's daughters have pro- 
duced no less than 280 standard performers, and 
among these are such noted performers as Custer 
2:05V 2 , Eyelet 2:06%, Allanwood 2:07%, Nutwood 
Grattan 2:07%, Bellwood A. 2:07%', Arion 2:07%, 
Consuella S. 2:07%, Fred Kohl 2:07%, and many 
others. 

It will be seen by the above that Dumont S. is 
bred in the very choicest of producing lines, cham- 
pion race horses, sires and dams being very closely 
related to him through all his immediate ancestors. 

He is a very fine individual, and those engaged in 
breeding the best will make no mistake by sending 
him their best mares. 

o 

DEATH OF BEN DAVIES. 



On January 18th Mr. Ben Davies. one of the promi- 
nent horse breeders of Southern California, died sud- 
denly at his home in San Bernardino. While at 
the dinner table he suddenly fell from bis chair, a 
blood vessel of his brain having ruptured. He died 
the following morning without regaining conscious- 
ness. Mr. Davies was well known to all the horse- 
men of Southern California and was held in tin- 
highest esteem by those who knew him. He owned 
a farm and bred and owned quite a large number 
of horses Among the horses owned by him at the 
time of his death were Zolock 2:05%. Delilah 2:09% 
and a number of others, some thirty head, nearly 
all of his own breeding. He bred the fast trotting 
mare Zephyr 2:07% by Zombro, and also bred her 
dam, Gazelle 2:11%. by Gossiper. Mr. Davies was 
a most successful breeder for the number of horses 
he owned, and used excellent judgment in mating 
his mares. He was a true gentleman in every sense 
of the word, and his death will be sincerely re- 
gretted by all. He leaves to his family a fine farm, 
near San Bernardino, that is in a high state of cul- 
tivation, also about thirty head of fine bred trotters 
and pacers that will now probably be sold. 

o 

Neva Simmons 2:11% is now twelve years old and 
has not raced since 1901, but her owner has taken 
her up and commenced jogging her for the Grand 
Circuit races shou.d she prove to be not with foal, 
which is now considered likely. 



THE DAM OF LEXINGTON. 

Some of the record-breaking runners of the past 
have been produced by mares that were not con- 
sidered first-class animals, judging from their char- 
acteristics as well as their performances upon the 
turf. The famous Lexington, that reduced the four- 
mile running record to 7:19%, was one of them. 
Many years ago the late Colonel S. D. Bruce, author 
of the~American Stud Book, described that mare as 
follows: 

"Alice Carneal, the dam of Lexington, was a bay 
and bred by Dr. E. Warfield. She never started in 
a public race until she was five years old. She was 
of a particularly high, nervous temperament, to such 
a high degree that she would get out of condition 
between her stable and the race course. Dr. War- 
field said that at homo she was superior to any 
horse he ever bred or owned. When drawn and 
fitted for a race she would sweat freely, tremble, 
purge, and become so nervous and excited as to 
totally unfit her to race, and was started with the 
greatest difficulty. At five years she started four 
times, won once, was second once and third twice. 
At six years she started twice, but won neither race. 
When seven she started once, but did not win. She 
started in seven races in all and won one of them." 

Most breeders of the present day would think if 
folly to try to raise race-winning record breakers 
from a mare of so faulty a te